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Developing Anti-Racism Strategies in Behavioral Health Agencies

11:30am - June 9, 2021 thru 12:45pm - June 9, 2021 | Timezone: US/Pacific
Northwest MHTTC
Registration Deadline: June 9, 2021
Need more information?
Contact us at northwest@mhttcnetwork.org

Join us for this 75-minute webinar, where we will discuss prioritizing racial equity in behavior health agencies.


ABOUT THIS EVENT

By engaging in this webinar, participants will begin to formulate anti-racist practices critical for behavioral health agencies. We can avoid performative and siloed diversity initiatives by starting with equity, leading to a more sustainable and authentic culture shift. In this session, we will take a critical look at the pervasive and innocuous consequences of racism on health and the role of behavioral health agencies and all members of the agency in responding. We will review dominant culture and institutional biases that may uphold inequities within agencies and strategize around dealing with change fatigue and resistance to essential anti-racist practices.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THIS SERIES



FACILITATOR

Ashley Stewart headshot

Ashley Stewart, MSW, PhD

Dr. Ashley Stewart is an Adjunct Expert, Trainer & Curriculum Development Specialist at C4 Innovations. She received her PhD from The Ohio State University, College of Social Work and her Master’s at Columbia University. She is an Assistant Professor at Temple University, College of Public Health, School of Social Work, training interdisciplinary students about social justice theories and frameworks and translational skills for anti-oppressive practice. Ashley provides racial equity training, consultation, and support and understands and respects the intricacies inherent in diversity and inclusion. Her research includes assessing the intersections of identity, structural oppression, health and mental health, and policy. In addition to the advanced study of the consequence and causes of identity-based oppression, Ashley supports the implementation of anti-oppressive practices at organizational, structural, programmatic, and clinical interventions.