School Mental Health

SAMHSA has provided funding to the MHTTC to support training and consultation in the area of school mental health to teachers and school staff regarding mental health services for students. It is under this supplemental funding that we are able to offer training and consultation directly to schools and community organizations affiliated with the work of schools. We have the capacity and expertise to provide national webinars, general trainings, professional development meetings, and intensive technical assistance/consultation services on school mental health topics.

The objectives of these activities are to: communicate the importance of mental health supports in schools, enhance the capacity to recognize and identify mental health concerns in students, and educate staff on the best models of school-based mental health services and when to link to community-based services.

Examples of potential professional development and training topics include: Youth Mental Health First Aid, Trauma-Informed Care, Managing Traumatic Events in Schools, Trauma and Mental Health, Cultivating Resiliency, Suicide Prevention, Social-Emotional Learning, Crisis Interventions, School Refusal and Anxiety, Staff Self-Care, and Advanced Mental Health Skills for Selected Staff.

The cost for these services is covered by the SAMHSA grant and is, therefore, no cost to the school.

For our current offerings, please see our activities calendar.

Addressing Family and Work Impacts | Recorded Skills Module 20 April 2021

ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This skills module addresses the topic of "Family / Work Demands and Responsibilities: Addressing the Personal Impacts of the Pandemic on the Family System." This is the recording of a live event which offered a small group training setting with breakout rooms and a facilitated learning environment. This module is part of our Disaster Response and Behavioral Health series with Dr. Kira Mauseth. Find out more about our Disaster Response and Behavioral Health series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides COVID-19 Behavioral Health Group Impact Reference Guide​ Behavioral Health Toolbox for Families: Supporting Children and Teens During the COVID-19 Pandemic​  Coping during COVID-19: A guide for emergency and health care professionals​   COVID-19 Guidance for Building Resilience in the Workplace Behavioral Health Resources Webpage​, Washington State Department of Health    Mental and Emotional Well-being Resources​ Washington State Coronavirus Response Infographic Library​ Washington Listens hotline: 1-833-681-0211     FACILITATOR Dr. Kira Mauseth Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates, teaches as a Senior Instructor at Seattle University and serves as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health. Her work and research interests focus on resilience, trauma and disaster behavioral health. She has worked extensively in Haiti with earthquake survivors, in Jordan with Syrian refugees and with first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States. Dr. Mauseth also conducts trainings with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities.

Addressing Family and Work Impacts | Recorded Skills Module 21 April 2021

ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This skills module addresses the topic of "Family / Work Demands and Responsibilities: Addressing the Personal Impacts of the Pandemic on the Family System." This is the recording of a live event which offered a small group training setting with breakout rooms and a facilitated learning environment. This module is part of our Disaster Response and Behavioral Health series with Dr. Kira Mauseth. Find out more about our Disaster Response and Behavioral Health series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides COVID-19 Behavioral Health Group Impact Reference Guide​ Behavioral Health Toolbox for Families: Supporting Children and Teens During the COVID-19 Pandemic​  Coping during COVID-19: A guide for emergency and health care professionals​   COVID-19 Guidance for Building Resilience in the Workplace Behavioral Health Resources Webpage​, Washington State Department of Health    Mental and Emotional Well-being Resources​ Washington State Coronavirus Response Infographic Library​ Washington Listens hotline: 1-833-681-0211     FACILITATOR Dr. Kira Mauseth Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates, teaches as a Senior Instructor at Seattle University and serves as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health. Her work and research interests focus on resilience, trauma and disaster behavioral health. She has worked extensively in Haiti with earthquake survivors, in Jordan with Syrian refugees and with first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States. Dr. Mauseth also conducts trainings with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities.

ADDRESSING Framework Worksheet

This worksheet prompts users to consider multiple dimensions of identity when conceptualizing unique strengths and needs. This resource is an extension of the guidelines detailed in Module 1 of CIE-WISE. For more information, please visit www.classroomwise.org.

Addressing Mental Health Concerns in Children and Teens

En Español Stress Management in Children and Teens Worry and anxiety are regular parts of life, but they can also be indications that your child needs more support. The recognition of anxiety disorders in young people has increased significantly over the past 10 years. Approximately 30% of children and adolescents will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their young lives. Knowing the signs and seeking professional help when needed will help to interrupt a progression that can lead to depression, poor school performance, and substance use. Anxiety in Children and Teens Worry and anxiety are regular parts of life, but they can also be indications that your child needs more support. The recognition of anxiety disorders in young people has increased significantly over the past 10 years. Approximately 30% of children and adolescents will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their young lives. Knowing the signs and seeking professional help when needed will help to interrupt a progression that can lead to depression, poor school performance, and substance use. Depression in Children and Teens While people used to think that depression only occurred in adults, we now know that children and adolescents can also experience depression. In fact, on average, approximately 3% of children ages 3-17 have a diagnosis of depression. That rate increases by 6-10% during adolescence. While many children experience down moods, the symptoms of depression should not be ignored. Suicide Warning Signs in Children and Teens Suicide is a serious and real concern among children and teens. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among youth ages 10-24. Suicide attempts are often related to other mental health conditions, but not always. Particularly among younger children, suicide attempts can be impulsive. Warning signs of suicide or suicidal statements should always be taken seriously and evaluated by a mental health professional. Suicidal feelings are treatable with appropriate intervention and support.

Addressing Traumatic Brain Injury: Neurodiversity Among Youth

Addressing Traumatic Brain Injury - Neurodiversity Among Youth January 26, 2021   The Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains MHTTC) is pleased to partner with the National Association of State Head Injury Administrators (NASHIA) to provide training related to traumatic brain injury and mental health.   Karen McAvoy, PsyD presented a 90-minute session on Understanding Neurodiversity Among Youth. This session provided an opportunity for school mental health professionals, and clinicians working with children and adolescents, to develop a better understanding of the implications of neurodiversity (traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, and trauma) in a youth population.   Access Slides Using the Download Link Above Recording Access Archived Training on Traumatic Brain Injury   Learning Outcomes Learn how to use the Building Blocks of Brain Development to understand typical neurodevelopment and neurodiversity among youth. Develop skills in applying the screening and assessment strategies of the Building Blocks of Brain Development to serve youth with co-occurring developmental, mental health, and substance use disorders. Examine the underlying skill deficits of "can'ts" (instead of "won'ts) which allows for antecedent management/interventions versus consequence-based management in serving youth.   Trainer Karen McAvoy, PsyD

Adult Resiliency Curriculum: Three Core Skills

This handout visualizes three core skills central to the Adult Resilience Curriculum, or ARC.

Advancing Community Schools: Lessons Learned and Visions for the Future

March 9, 2022 Hear from the Director of the National Center for Community Schools, Abe Fernandez, about the Community Schools Framework—a way for schools to collaborate with local partners to meet the holistic needs of the whole school community. Leaders in the community schools movement in New England will also share their journeys, as well as the challenges they overcame, the lessons they learned, and their visions for a future where community schools are viable and vital options.   Abe Fernandez, Director, National Center for Community Schools for Children's Aid (NY) Matthew DeBlois, Principal, Vergennes Union Elementary School (VT) Emily Mallozzi, Program Manager for Community Schools for Pawtucket School Department (RI) Dwayne Conway, Former Principal of Maranacook Community High School (ME) Rebecca Tatistcheff, EdD, Principal of Cabot School (VT) Martha Staeheli, PhD, Director, School Mental Health Initiative, New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center
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