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Multimedia
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare providers found themselves abruptly thrust into the world of telehealth services delivery. As agencies, clinicians, and clients increased the use of these new technologies and methods of clinical practice and collaboration, an apparent need for ethical best practices within this modality arose. This presentation will emphasize ethical best practices using technology and telehealth, ethical responses to unique challenges faced by clients and providers using this modality, and ethical concerns unique to using virtual methods in clinical practice.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this educational activity, learners will be able to: Identify ethical concerns specific to virtual service delivery in their clinical practice. Identify ethical responses to challenges associated with the use of virtual technologies. Identify and mitigate limitations in the use of technology and virtual platforms in their work.   PRESENTER:  Dr. Jill D. Stinson is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She received her dual doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Psychology, Policy, and Law from the University of Arizona prior to serving as the Director of Sex Offender Treatment at Fulton State Hospital with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Her teaching focuses on professional ethics, forensic psychology, and psychological assessment, while her research focuses on serious mental illness, personality disorders, self-regulatory problems, and histories of early childhood maltreatment in persons who have committed violent and sexual offenses, as well as issues related to community re-entry, stigma, and suicidality in justice-involved populations. Dr. Stinson has authored three books related to etiology and treatment of sexual offending and motivation to engage in therapy. She is the incoming Editor-in-Chief for Sexual Abuse, Chair of the ETSU Campus IRB, and Secretary of the Board of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 22, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Providing Weight-Inclusive Care: From Diet Culture and Weight Stigma to Health At Every Size, originally held on April 4, 2024. Presentation slides
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Due to the various barriers that children and adolescents often experience when accessing in-person mental healthcare (e.g., stigma, transportation, cost, insurance), digital interventions have been identified as an alternate and promising modality to facilitate evidence-based intervention service delivery for young people. Youth digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) are defined in this presentation as publicly available, online self-administered intervention programs that do not require a clinician or caregiver to implement. This area of literature is rapidly growing and specifically supports the effectiveness of the modification of cognitive-behavioral therapy into a digital/blended self-administered format. This presentation will outline the general evidence-base of youth DMHIs across settings, with a focus on CBT-based DMHIs and general best practices based on the current state of the literature. Specific guidance will be provided regarding which subpopulations of children and adolescents may be good candidates for DMHIs, along with subpopulations with less evidentiary support. Additionally, this presentation will provide introductory guidance for providers regarding how to use DMHIs within stepped models of care across various care settings (i.e., integrated pediatric primary care settings, schools, etc.). Further, this presentation will discuss practical considerations and limitations of using these tools in real world clinical and school settings, with step-by-step recommendations for ways to put these tools into practice. Finally, the DMHI literature will be discussed within the larger context of culturally sensitive behavioral and mental healthcare. Presented by: Maddy Esterer Maddy has a Master's degree in School Psychology and is a Provisionally Licensed Mental Health Practitioner in Nebraska. Maddy will be earning her PhD in School Psychology in 2024. Maddy currently works for the Munroe-Meyer Institute providing behavioral health services to youth, adolescents, and families in an integrated primary care setting. Maddy has experience providing behavioral and mental health supports to youth in schools and primary care settings in both Michigan and Nebraska. Maddy is also a team member of the Mid-America Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network, which assists mental health programs and providers in establishing evidence-based programs that are locally supported and sustainable in the Mid-America region. Maddy has been building her expertise in digital interventions for mental health for several years, which complements her other interests in trauma-informed care and equitable service provision across school and clinical settings.
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event The Connection Between Heart Disease and Mental Health in the Black Community, originally held on February 15, 2024. View Slides
Published: March 15, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Obesity and Lifestyle Medicine Impact on Mental Health and Diabetes, originally held on November 28, 2023.   Slide presentation
Published: December 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The December 2023 issue shares recorded content on wound care and xylazine, social media basics for preventionists, an infographic on providing behavioral healthcare to people living with HIV, and SAMHSA's tips for supporting your mental health through the holidays. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: December 7, 2023
Print Media
Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) is increasingly required by both state behavioral health authorities and funders such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The implementation of PCRP requires attention to multiple aspects of the change process including overall agency culture, stakeholder competencies in PCRP, and organizational business practices. This report presents key findings from a multi-agency learning collaborative offering intensive training and technical assistance to support the uptake of PCRP across the New England Region.    by Milena Stanojlović, Maria O’Connell, Dana Asby, Stephanie Lanteri, Larry Davidson & Janis Tondora  
Published: September 26, 2023
Presentation Slides
The South Southwest MHTTC is pleased to collaborate with the Texas Association of Community Health Centers (TACHC) to host a Trauma Informed Care Open Office Hours series. Get 'hands on' application and clarity on concepts through case-study examples and interactive discussion with TACHC Trauma Informed Care Coordinators. This session was held on July 25, 2023 and focused on the foundation and application of Trauma Informed Care.
Published: August 3, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event Integrated Mental and Physical Health Care: Empowering the African American Community, originally held on July 20, 2023. Presentation Slides
Published: July 21, 2023
Multimedia
2023 marked a significant expansion of behavioral health resources for individuals, families, and providers in Massachusetts. Beginning this year, Massachusetts implemented key components of its Behavioral Health Roadmap at the same time the Massachusetts Psychosis Access & Triage Hub (M-PATH) began providing services. Combined, Community Behavioral Health Centers (CBHCs), DMH’s Behavioral Health Help Line (BHHL), and M-PATH have vastly expanded access to behavioral health services across the Commonwealth. This is an overview detailing the who-what-when-where-why-and-how (to access) these critical new resources.   Presenters: Dr. Margaret Guyer, PhD, Michael Stepansky, MPP   This webinar was co-hosted by the Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET, www.mapnet.online)   View a recording of this 6/30/23 event here. 
Published: July 7, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event The Connection Between Migraines and Mental Health in the Black Community, originally held on June 1, 2023.   Presentation Slides
Published: June 15, 2023
Multimedia
  Learning Objectives: Identify symptoms of selective mutism with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Describe evidenced-based treatment interventions for selective mutism in an integrated primary care practice. Report the factors that contribute to Complex ADHD. Discuss practice guidelines for interdisciplinary behavioral and medication treatments for complex ADHD in a primary care practice. Explain the nuances to diagnosis and how evidence-based treatment changes for children with comorbid PTSD and ADHD vs either disorder alone.   Presented by: Cynthia Ellis, MD, and Terri Matthews, PhD, APRN-NP, BCBA-D Dr. Cynthia Ellis is a Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in the Department of Developmental Medicine at the Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation. She is board certified in Pediatrics, Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities. Dr. Ellis received her medical degree from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and completed residency training in Pediatrics and fellowship training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Medical College of Virginia/VCU. She has been practicing in the field of Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics for over 20 years. She has extensive clinical, research, and educational experience with children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and behavioral/emotional disorders. Her clinical expertise is in the psychopharmacological management of children with developmental disabilities and other behavioral disorders. She has also published extensively in the field. Dr. Ellis is the Director of the Munroe-Meyer Institute’s MCH-funded LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) and ALA (Autism Leadership Academy) Interdisciplinary Training Programs. Dr. Ellis has served as the medical director for numerous public school and interdisciplinary community-based programs and as a research consultant in the field of developmental disabilities. She also participates in a number of other leadership positions on committees and boards.   Dr. Mathews is an associate professor in the College of Nursing. Dr. Mathews received her bachelor's degree in nursing from University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE; her master’s degree in nursing from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and her doctoral degree in Developmental and Child Psychology from the University of Kansas. Dr. Mathews clinical specialty is child and adolescent psychiatric mental health nursing. She is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and a Licensed Psychologist. Dr. Mathews joined the faculty at the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing in 2008.     Learn more about this series: Tele-Behavioral Health Consultation (TBHC) Primary Care Webinar Series    
Published: June 6, 2023
Toolkit
  Primary care can serve as a key entry point for children exposed to trauma to receive access to mental health services. This toolkit accompanies Screening and Assessing for Trauma in Primary Care.   Learn more about the series: Implementing Trauma-Informed Practices in Pediatric Integrated Primary Care    
Published: June 1, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event Addressing Health Inequities in Life Expectancy Through Community-Engaged Research, originally held on May 9, 2023.   Slide presentation
Published: May 11, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event Mental Health & Obesity in the Black Community, originally held on March 16, 2023.   Presentation slides
Published: March 24, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event Diabetes and Depression Comorbidity in the Black Community, originally held on November 17, 2022.   Presentation slides
Published: November 30, 2022
Multimedia
Children with an intellectual or developmental disability (IDD) are more likely to experience traumatic events and it is important to understand the impact of trauma of these children. This 1-hour webinar will define and explore trauma-informed care with children with IDD and ways to screen these children for trauma in primary care settings. Objectives: Define intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) Discuss how traumatic experiences may affect children with IDD Discuss trauma-informed care with children with IDD Determine ways to screen and assess for trauma with children with IDD Presented by: Allison “Alli” Morton, PhD Allison “Alli” Morton, PhD, LMHP, PLP, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology at the Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. She recently earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Texas Tech University and completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Dr. Morton provides clinical services in an integrated behavioral health clinic at Children’s Physicians Creighton. Her clinical and research interests center around the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based practices with children and adolescents, particularly in relation to trauma. Dr. Morton also has an active interest in promoting resilience following traumatic events and fostering use of positive parenting practices in primary care and outpatient settings. Learn more about the series: Implementing Trauma-Informed Practices in Pediatric Integrated Primary Care  
Published: October 21, 2022
Multimedia
Centering Youth Voices & Prioritizing Youth Engagement with PATCH (Providers and Teens Connecting for Health)   DESCRIPTION: Join PATCH as they introduce this webinar series and set the stage for successful youth engagement in school based mental health. You'll learn about the PATCH Model for Youth Engagement and how you too can center youth voice and get a sneak peak of sessions to come for the 2022–2023 school year!     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Learn about PATCH's unique Model for Youth Engagement Identify what makes youth engagement strategies successful Explore ways youth and be centered and involved in school-based mental health      PRESENTER: Erica Koepsel, MA Erica Koepsel is the PATCH Director of Youth Engagement. With a Master of Arts in Gender and Women’s Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and experience as a sexual health educator for diverse groups of youth in Topeka, KS, and Minneapolis, MN, Erica Koepsel joined the PATCH team in 2015 to continue her passion for improving health education for adolescents and young adults.  In her current role with PATCH, she enjoys combining her background in health education with advocacy while also working with Teen Educators to promote open and honest communication about tough topics.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: October 12, 2022
Toolkit
Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016). Authors: Johnson, K., Garcia, A., Young, R., Roberts, H., & Clarke, B.  
Published: September 14, 2022
Toolkit
Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016). Authors: Roberts, H., Johnson, K., & Clarke, B.  
Published: September 14, 2022
Toolkit
Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016). Authors: Johnson, K., Roberts, H., & Clarke, B.  
Published: September 14, 2022
Toolkit
Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016). Authors: Young, K., Johnson, S., & Clarke, B.  
Published: September 14, 2022
Toolkit
Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016). Author: Johnson, K., Garcia, A., Young, K., Roberts, H., & Clarke, B.  
Published: September 14, 2022
Toolkit
  Research suggests that supporting gender diverse youth has significant physical and emotional health benefits. Lack of support increases stress, isolation, and some risky health behaviors (I.e., access to hormones without the guidance of a medical provider). Experts recommend providing comprehensive care for gender diverse youth which includes increased health care access, improved awareness from individuals working with youth (I.e., school personnel), and gender affirming laws and policies (Dowshen et al., 2016).    Authors: Johnson, K., Roberts, H., & Clarke, B.
Published: September 14, 2022
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