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Racial Equity and Cultural Diversity Resource Compilation

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School Based Mental Health

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June is Pride Month

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June is PTSD Awareness Month

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Racial Equity and Cultural Diversity Resource Compilation

Check out our compilation of products and resources on cultural responsiveness, racial equity and cultural diversity for the mental health workforce, curated by the MHTTC Behavioral Health Equity & Cultural Responsiveness Working Group
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Free 3-part training
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School Based Mental Health

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Great Lakes MHTTC

University of Wisconsin–Madison
1513 University Avenue
Madison,
WI
53706
HHS Region 5
IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI
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The Great Lakes Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (Great Lakes MHTTC) is located at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies (CHESS).

We are funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to provide evidence-based technical assistance, training, and resources addressing the needs of the behavioral and mental health workforce in Health and Human Services (HHS) Region 5:  Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

We work closely with the Great Lakes ATTC and the Great Lakes PTTC, both of which are also based out of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, CHESS.

Recent News

From the Great Lakes MHTTC
Jun. 12, 2024
ICYMI: Read Part 1 of this 2-part blog series! Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) is a psychological response to a traumatic event that typically arises within a month of the experience. If untreated, ASD can evolve into Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Additionally, individuals with PTSD are at an increased risk of developing substance use disorders (SUD), […]
Jun. 12, 2024
The majority of clients with substance use disorder (SUD) have a concurrent traumatic stress disorder (Mate, 2010). The traumatic stress disorder often precedes the SUD (Wright, 2022).  Both disorders have unique triggers. The two disorders in combination can play off each other and lead persons with co-occurring disorders to slip through the cracks (Sanders, 2011). […]
Jun. 04, 2024
As the baby boom cohort continues to age, the number of older adults in the United States continues to grow, now making up over 20 percent of the general population. Substance use and mental health are major public health concerns among older adults, despite tremendous emotional resiliency in this population. Behavioral Health among Older Adults: Results […]

Upcoming Events

Hosted by the Great Lakes MHTTC
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and commuinities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 3, Action in Advocacy, participants will learn: Components of an advocacy plan Examples of effective advocacy     TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the series.     PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  The United Nations has set forth the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In part, these goals aim to advance “a plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity” and “realize the human rights of all” by centering global efforts on health equity. This 90-minute virtual session will define health equity, identify evidence-based practices supporting health equity, review priority populations affected by health inequities, and explain the far-reaching impact(s) caused by disparities in healthcare. We will also discuss other salient health equity topics including our evolution of understanding, an expanding unit of analysis, trauma-informed care, local-to-global (dis)connections, and policy-practice implications within the context of sustainable, collective futures.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of what health equity is and how it has evolved Identify the impact of health inequity and health disparity Learn policy and practice implications within the context of collective futures     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.      PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This training is full. If you'd like to be put on a waiting list, please contact Jen Winslow ([email protected]).   An Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Enhancing Your Practice and Your Life with Acceptance, Self-Compassion, and Values-Based Action. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is an evidenced-based intervention model grounded in mindfulness, self-compassion, and values-based action. Clients learn to encounter thoughts and feelings in a mindful way, neither dwelling on them nor pushing them away. At the same time, they are encouraged to act on their most deeply held values. In over 1000 randomized controlled trials and nearly 200 meta-analyses and systematic reviews, ACT has been shown to be efficacious for a wide variety of problems helping professionals address, including depression, anxiety, OCD, psychosis, substance abuse, chronic pain, dealing with cancer, stress, and stigma. Rather than going after reducing symptoms, ACT increases psychological flexibility: the capacity to turn to the present moment as a conscious human being and take action according to personally-chosen values. ACT can enhance your practice as professional as well move one, giving you a transdiagnostic evidence-based model from which to stand. But it can also impact your life, giving you a framework for preventing burnout, finding balance, and engaging meaningfully in the world outside of work. In this two-day, highly interactive virtual workshop, professionals of any experience level will be introduced to psychological flexibility both intellectually and experientially. You will learn what it’s like, in practice, to open up to thoughts and feelings without getting entangled in them, identify what truly matters to you, and take meaningful action. Training modalities will include brief lecture, clinical vignettes, clinical demonstrations, mindfulness exercises, experiential exercises, large group discussions, small group discussions, and small-group skills practice. This won’t be your typical slog of slides as you sit for hours with glazed eyes. You’ll get multiple opportunities to watch ACT demonstrations, practice ACT with yourself, and practice ACT skills with others. The workshop is intended to be both professionally and personally meaningful.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define psychological flexibility and identify its six components: acceptance, defusion, present moment awareness, self-as-context, values, and committed action. Identify three strategies for facilitating acceptance and willingness with clients. Identify three strategies for facilitating defusion with clients. Help clients contact the moment-to-moment experience of thoughts, feelings, and sensations without becoming absorbed in them or trying to push them away. Contact a sense of self that is more stable than transient thoughts and feelings and transcends personal narratives about who they are and what they are capable of. Facilitate conversations with clients about personal values and values-based behavior activation.   PARTICIPANT REQUIREMENTS Must have the appropriate technology and work environment to join the Zoom training sessions. Must actively engage during training sessions using both camera and microphone. Space is limited. Please only register if you are able to attend both days of the training, Due to the limited capacity, priority will be given to those working in HHS Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI).   CONTINUING EDUCATION Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 12 continuing education (CE) hours. CE certification will be managed by the co-sponsoring organization, UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work.   PRESENTER   Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist in the state of Utah and a Professor of Psychology at Utah State University, where he co-runs the ACT Research Group (with Dr. Levin). He received his B.A. and M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, his Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Reno, and completed his clinical internship at the University of British Columbia Hospital. He is past-President of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science, the organization most associated with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). His research focuses on the use of ACT across a variety of clinical presentations with an emphasis on obsessive compulsive and related disorders. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers, many book chapters, and 9 books, with the most recent being ACT in Steps (with Levin and Ong) and the Anxious Perfectionist (with Ong). His research has been funded through multiple sources including the National Institute of Mental Health and the IOCDF. In 2022, he was rated as currently the most productive author on ACT and that USU was the most productive institution in the world.   This training is co-sponsored by the UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.

Products & Resources

Developed by the Great Lakes MHTTC
Multimedia
Please note: This recording will be available until July 13, 2024.   “There is no health without mental health.”  – World Health Organization (WHO) The notion of integrated care in the field of healthcare has evolved over time. Historically, integrated care referred to the integration of mental health and addictions treatment, which is now called behavioral health. Today, integrated care refers to the integration of behavioral health and physical health. Integrated care is a best practice for supporting person-centered holistic healthcare due to the use of interprofessional collaboration with a focus on achieving the Quintuple Aim in healthcare. There is an expanding lens of integrated care beyond biomedicine that incorporates co-production of knowledge. This 90-minute virtual session will cover what constitutes integrated care, the shift from fee-for-service to value-based care, the collaborative care model, resource hubs, practice frameworks, and expanding perspectives on this evolving approach to care.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Be able to define integrated care within the context of mainstream medicine Learn about the Collaborative Care Model as an integrated care best practice Understand integrated care practice frameworks and expanding care perspectives   PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The June 2024 issue features content celebrating Pride Month, PTSD Awareness Month, and Intersection of Addiction and Racism: A Curated Bibliography‒a new comprehensive resource created by AMERSA, the ATTC NCO, and the PTTC NCO. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Multimedia
Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale   PRESENTERS: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.   The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
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