Learn About the Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC

Who We Are

En Español Sobre Nosotros | Adiestramiento y Capacitación | Iniciativa de salud mental escolar del MHTTC | Recursos de COVID-19

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Learn About the Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC

Who We Are

En Español Sobre Nosotros | Adiestramiento y Capacitación | Iniciativa de salud mental escolar del MHTTC | Recursos de COVID-19

Ver Página

Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC

Rutgers School of Health Professions Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions
675 Hoes Lane West, 8th Floor
Piscataway,
NJ
08854
HHS Region 2
NY, NJ, PR, USVI
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The Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC serves New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands, providing training, technical assistance, and resource dissemination to support and enhance the mental health workforce. 

The Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC is located at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, School of Health Professions, Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions.  

Funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the MHTTC will work with organizations and practitioners who provide mental health services to strengthen their capacity to deliver effective, evidence-based interventions. 

We will offer:

  • Targeted trainings for specific audiences (e.g., providers, administrators, teachers, police, peers) delivered in-person and via online educational courses.
  • Intensive train-the-trainer programs to enhance local capacity and sustainability of new practices.
  • Technical assistance/consultation to facilitate the translation and adoption of new approaches into practice. 
  • Webinars on a range of topics informed by stakeholder input. 

Recent News

From the Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC
Sep. 18, 2023
Because individuals with vision loss can experience a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues as compared to their sighted peers, Prevent Blindness, the nation’s leading nonprofit eye health and safety organization, has engaged experts from around the country to raise awareness, provide education and offer newly developed resources for patients, care […]
Jul. 24, 2023
The Northeast & Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) is currently conducting a research study to increase our collective understanding of the experience, knowledge, attitudes, and perceived needs of mental health providers in delivering services and supports to individuals who are blind or visually impaired. With the information gained from this survey, we hope […]
Jul. 22, 2021
The Northeast & Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) is asking for less than ten minutes of your time to complete a short needs assessment. This needs assessment is intended to identify mental health training and technical assistance needs among individuals in New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands (HHS […]

Upcoming Events

Hosted by the Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC
Webinar/Virtual Training
Description: With increasing overdose rates, a more lethal drug supply, and more prescription medications in many homes, it’s important to educate a wider audience about harm reduction and what it means: essentially, reducing the negative consequences of potentially risky behaviors. This workshop will present different definitions of harm reduction, highlight how we all practice harm reduction in our lives, and explain how harm reduction strategies are implemented in different settings, including syringe service programs and psychotherapy. It will also address community concerns and hesitations about harm reduction, ways to reduce the harms of stigma surrounding drug use, and opportunities to build bridges between harm reduction and treatment for people with substance use disorders Goals: Increase participants’ understanding of harm reduction principles and strategies, address myths and misperceptions about harm reduction, and explore how harm reduction can be part of the continuum of care. Workshop Outline: Different ways of defining harm reduction (National Harm Reduction Coalition, SAMHSA, NIDA). Harm reduction principles. How we all practice harm reduction (including bike helmets, sunscreen, designated drivers). Harm reduction services provided by syringe service programs (SSPs), overdose prevention centers (OPCs) and mobile units in some communities. Who harm reduction services may not be reaching (different population groups). Harm reduction psychotherapy (key practitioners and principles, including embracing goals like reduced substance use). Hesitations about harm reduction (traditional objections, like it “enables” drug use, vs. newer concerns, e.g. it’s “not enough” for people with complex needs). Building bridges between harm reduction and treatment for people with substance use disorders. Reducing harm by addressing stigma (types of stigma, avoiding stigmatizing terms). Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Other Session in this Series: Session 1: Addressing Myths About Substance Use, Addiction, Treatment, and Recovery Session 2: Current Substance Use Trends and Evolving Risks Session 4: Understanding Addiction and Options for Care
Webinar/Virtual Training
Description: Anyone who has tried to help a loved one obtain treatment for a substance use disorder knows how challenging it can be to find quality, affordable care that’s accessible when someone is ready for help. Even for professionals working in healthcare and related fields, evaluating the options available and navigating payment and other hurdles can be overwhelming. This workshop will help educate participants about treatment options for opioid, stimulant and other substance use disorders and how to overcome barriers to care. We’ll discuss factors to consider for treatment referrals, resources to connect people with peer support, and how services are evolving to support families and offer person-centered, trauma-informed care. We’ll also discuss the neurobiology of addiction, how brain changes can impact decision-making, and strategies to improve treatment engagement. Goals: Increase understanding of different treatments for substance use disorders (including medications for opioid use disorder), address concerns about treatment effectiveness and practices, and provide tools to help improve connections to care. Workshop Outline: Review criteria for a substance use disorder and how it is defined. Present statistics about treatment for substance use and mental health disorders, using sources such as the 2022 NSDUH and other surveys. Describe the treatment gap and how it can be addressed by removing barriers to care. Discuss goals of care for people with substance use and mental health challenges. Explain how different medications for opioid use disorder work (methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone). Discuss options for treating stimulant use disorders, including contingency management. Discuss the neurobiology of addiction (e.g. how brain changes impact decision-making). Discuss factors to consider for treatment referrals and resources to connect people with treatment and peer support as well as services for families. Address misperceptions about treatment and how services are evolving to embrace person-centered, trauma-informed care. Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Other Session in this Series: Session 1: Addressing Myths About Substance Use, Addiction, Treatment, and Recovery Session 2: Current Substance Use Trends and Evolving Risks Session 3: Harm Reduction Principles, Strategies and Limits
Webinar/Virtual Training
This presentation will provide an introduction to and review of restorative practices and will address readiness for implementation at the school level.

Products & Resources

Developed by the Northeast & Caribbean MHTTC
Presentation Slides
Description: How did you learn about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery? What are the sources of information that shaped your views? This workshop will discuss how news, entertainment, and social media, as well as personal experience, influence how people understand substance use disorders and different pathways to recovery. It will also address common beliefs like, “You have to hit rock bottom” and “Recovery is rare,” and explain how attitudes, practices, and data collection have evolved. Information from the 2022 National Survey on Drug Use and Health and other sources will be presented, including prevalence of illicit substance use, substance use disorders, and co-occurring mental health challenges. Goals: Encourage participants to examine the sources of their attitudes and beliefs about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery, reconsider any misperceptions, and expand their understanding of these topics by presenting current research and statistics. Workshop Outline: Discuss where participants learned about addiction, treatment and recovery (personal experience, news and entertainment media, etc.). Highlight themes that often appear in films, TV shows, books, music, and social media, including overview of research findings. Discuss critiques of media coverage of these topics. Address common beliefs and whether they’re supported by evidence (hitting rock bottom, enabling and co-dependency, tough love). Discuss how personal experience influences attitudes and beliefs. Present graphics illustrating types of substance use (experimental, social, risky, etc.). Discuss different reasons people use drugs, and how that varies for different substances over time. Present substance use and mental health statistics, using sources such as the 2022 NSDUH. Discuss criteria for diagnosing a substance use disorder (mild, moderate or severe). Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Session Recording:
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Participants will be able to define a school-wide crisis and an individual student emergency, understand incident management guidelines at each phase, and identify possible barriers to school emergency responses in order to positively engage leadership/staff during an emergency.
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Session learning objectives: Provide an overview of the prevalence of mental health challenges among youth before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Examine specific groups of youth that may be more vulnerable to mental health challenges post-pandemic. Explore pandemic-related changes in behavior patterns and coping mechanisms adopted by youth, including the role of technology. Describe ways in which schools can identify students who experience persistent challenges and implement school-based programs to best support these youth.  
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