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eNewsletter or Blog
The final issue of our June 2024 newsletter features upcoming Northwest MHTTC events and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: June 24, 2024
Multimedia
A series of monthly calls for ACT psychiatric care providers. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Best Practices at the University of North Carolina. ABOUT THIS EVENT Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a multidisciplinary, team-based model that provides intensive community-based and outreach-oriented services to people who experience the most severe and persistent mental illness. The vast majority also have a co-occurring substance use disorder and many experience comorbid medical illnesses. The Northwest MHTTC is hosting a series for ACT psychiatric care providers. We welcome all ACT psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and other prescribers. Sessions will be held once a month on Thursdays at 12:00-1:30 pm Pacific/3:00-4:30 pm Eastern, May-July 2024. Learn more about the series and upcoming sessions here. Our second session on June 20th discussed Clozapine and long-acting injectables (LAI). Learn more about the series and upcoming sessions here. Slides Slides - Condensed FACILITATOR Robert Cotes, MD Dr. Robert O. Cotes is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He serves as Physician Expert for SMI Adviser (www.smiadviser.org), which is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and administered by the American Psychiatric Association. SMI Adviser provides evidence-based resources to clinicians, individuals with serious mental illness, and their families. He is Director of the Clinical & Research Program for Psychosis at Grady Health System, which comprises of three clinical programs.  The PSTAR Clinic provides evidence-based, recovery-oriented care for individuals with persistent symptoms of psychosis, specializing in the use of clozapine. Project ARROW is a coordinated specialty care team for people experiencing early psychosis, offering comprehensive, person-centered care using a multidisciplinary approach. Youth and Family TREE provides care to adolescents and young adults with a mental health condition and substance use. Dr. Cotes is an investigator for multiple research studies focused on treatment options for people with psychosis. His research focuses on clozapine and early psychosis.  Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: June 21, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT The landlord-tenant relationship has evolved considerably in the last 50-some years, and yet housing providers sometimes still behave like feudal lords of the land. A tenant who does not understand the actual terms of the modern rental relationship can be swayed by what sound like convincing statements or directives from their landlords, which actually are not in accord with current law at all. The landlord-tenant relationship works when both parties remain professional and businesslike. Generally, a large portion of the tenant’s monthly income is paid to their landlord. When paying for housing, tenants have the right to be treated fairly and lawfully. We will discuss working with landlords and property managers and owners who flout the law and make tenants believe genuine issues don’t matter. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides Washington Low Income Housing Alliance - want to get involved with WLIHA? Please email [email protected] King County Tenant Resource Line, open M-F (except holidays) from 9 AM to 1 PM: (206) 580-0762 Solid Ground classes: Webinars for tenants  Fair Housing Center of Washington FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation. Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: June 21, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Implementing Policies and Practices to Support LGBTQ+ Youth in Schools, Part 1 originally held on June 11, 2024.
Published: June 20, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Explore emotion regulation strategies and their importance in DBT Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.
Published: June 19, 2024
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ABOUT THIS EVENT The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with the Mountain West AIDS Education & Training Center Program (AETC) on this webinar series related to sexual health.  The prevalence of HIV among people who have serious mental illnesses is four times as high as that of the general population. Factors that contribute to increased HIV risk include: psychiatric symptoms (e.g., disorganized thoughts and behaviors, delusions and poor executive functioning); higher rates of co-occurring substance use and other HIV risk behaviors; increased risk of social vulnerabilities, including poverty and housing instability; structural barriers (such as stigma and discrimination) to accessing medical care and prevention services in traditional medical settings. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) refers to medications for HIV-negative people to prevent them from getting HIV-infected. Current guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend informing all sexually active adults and adolescents about PrEP, but in a large 2020 survey of outpatient mental health care programs, only 33% of programs offered HIV testing and only 20% prescribed PrEP. Behavioral health treatment settings offer opportunities for identifying the need for PrEP and linking clients to services. Our third session will provide information about the effectiveness of PrEP for reducing risk of acquiring HIV and describe criteria for eligibility and best practices for initiating and monitoring persons receiving PrEP prescriptions. Learning Objectives: Provide an overview of PrEP Review PrEP efficacy and effectiveness Assess PrEP side effects, risks, HIV-1 drug resistance, and other concerns Part 3 of the Sexual Health Series (click to view all sessions in this series). Slides Word cloud responses FACILITATORS Lydia Chwastiak, MD, MPH Dr. Chwastiak is a psychiatrist, internist and health services researcher who is a Professor in the UW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  Over the past 22 years, her research has focused on improving care and outcomes for people with complex needs in low resource settings, such as low-barrier primary care clinics and community mental health centers in the US, and primary and secondary medical settings in India and Nepal. Dr. Chwastiak is co-directs the UW Behavioral Research in HIV (BIRCH) Center, an NIMH-funded AIDS Research Center, and is the PI and co-director of the Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (NW MHTTC). Joanne D. Stekler, MD, MPH Dr. Stekler began her career working to expand routine HIV antibody testing and access to pooled HIV nucleic acid amplification testing to diagnose acute HIV infection. She has led several studies investigating novel methods to diagnose acute and early HIV infection; comparisons of point-of-care HIV tests; and home, self-testing for HIV infection. Her current work is evaluating the feasibility of implementing point-of-care nucleic acid tests for HIV diagnosis and treatment monitoring in community and clinical sites in Seattle. Her other interests include HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and use of technology for HIV prevention. Dr. Stekler started the first community-based PrEP clinic in Seattle in 2013 and the first telePrEP clinic in 2015. Through collaborations with the Washington State Department of Health and Mountain West AIDS Education and Training Center, she has been working to expand access to PrEP to reduce healthcare disparities among populations disproportionately impacted by HIV. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: June 19, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This 90-minute webinar will cover primary themes related to effective culturally informed behavioral health support. When providing support or crisis intervention for individuals or groups of people from cultural and ethnic backgrounds different from our own, there are certain considerations to keep in mind that increase our effectiveness as clinicians and decrease the opportunities for miscommunication. We will share examples from real-world scenarios that include communication tactics and reminders, as well as content areas such as family dynamics, safety and coping mechanisms that can be addressed in a way that helps to facilitate a healthy and successful outcome across different cultures. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides References and Resources for Culturally Informed Support FACILITATORS Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates in Everett and Edmonds, WA, is a Teaching Professor at Seattle University and formerly served as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health throughout the COVID response. She also owns Astrum Health LLC, and consults with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities. Dr. Mauseth has provided training to community groups and professionals both regionally and abroad as the co-developer of the Health Support Team© program. Her work and research focus on disaster behavioral health, resilience, and recovery from trauma as well as small and large-scale critical incident response and preparation for organizations. She has worked abroad extensively with disaster survivors and refugees in Haiti, Jordan and Poland, and has trained first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States, and currently serves in the adult mental health clinical seat on Washington State’s Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC). Salsabiel Alzubaidi, MA Salsabiel Alzubaidi is an Organizational Transformation, Leadership, and Legacy Consultant driven by her belief in justice and her appreciation for the rich tapestry of human diversity. With a lifelong passion for innovation in diversity and inclusion across social, educational, and professional realms, Salsabiel has honed her expertise in guiding organizations through transformative journeys. Her impactful contributions have left a legacy of progress at organizations such as Shift Energy Group, For9a.com, Seattle University, and Questscope, as well as governmental and numerous international social development platforms. Throughout her career, Salsabiel has distinguished herself as a dynamic HR and educational programming professional, specializing in programs that promote diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Her ability to unite diverse populations and maximize program effectiveness underscores her commitment to driving positive change.  Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: June 18, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource:  In today's fast-paced work environment, understanding the intricate relationship between mental and physical health is crucial for fostering a thriving workplace. In this on-demand recording, the presenters explore practical strategies and insights that can help enhance overall well-being and create a more positive work culture. Discover how the mind-body connection can transform employee wellness.
Published: June 18, 2024
Print Media
Recent prevalence estimates indicate 1 in 36 school-age children are autistic. Autistic students are much more likely than non-autistic students to experience mental health challenges, including executive function differences and co-occurring anxiety. This brief report provides an overview of key SEMHTTC resources to support the mental health of autistic students, particularly regarding anxiety, executive function, and challenging behaviors.
Published: June 17, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third  issue of our June 2024 newsletter features Juneteenth resources, new upcoming Northwest MHTTC events and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: June 17, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon!   Event Description Clinical and psychological assessments are crucial diagnostic tools; however, it is the assessor, not the assessment, that diagnoses, and as such our tools are only as good as our understanding of science and theory. We will review important trauma theory and science and its implications for diagnosis; and considerations for taking a trauma-informed approach to psychological and clinical assessment will be discussed.  Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: June 17, 2024
Multimedia
This Family Workforce event featured the National Federation of Families and a panel of their New England affiliates. Gail Cormier, Project Director with the National Federation of Families, talked about National offerings including Family Peer Support certification, Family workforce education and technical assistance, and their transition to lifespan support as well as general offerings. Representatives from New England affiliates introduced their affiliates highlighting any unique offerings in their prospective states. This webinar was an excellent opportunity for providers who work with families to learn about the offerings of the National Federation of Families and local affiliates as well as anyone who might be interested.
Published: June 14, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Black & Latinx Perinatal PTSD: What Behavioral Health Providers Need To Know, Session 1: Understanding the Intersectionality of Race, Culture, and Perinatal PTSD originally held on June 12, 2024. Slide presentation
Published: June 14, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Anxiety and Phobic Disorders in the Black Community originally held on May 30, 2024. Slide presentation
Published: June 14, 2024
Multimedia
As peer workers, we are committed to providing the best care possible, rooted in peer-centered values of choice, autonomy, and ethics. Join us for a 2-hour presentation and discussion on the ethics of peer support, with a special focus on the impact of perceived credibility on our work and support for peers.   Key Takeaways: A comprehensive understanding of perceived credibility and shared reality, and how those concepts impact the work of peer workers and the individuals they support. An understanding of the role of ethics in peer work. An understanding of how to discuss ethical concerns with peers, peer workers, and clinical coworkers.   Presenter: Rowan Willis-Powell (she/they) is an experienced systems transformation advocate with 10 years of experience using their living expertise to uplift the voices of youth peers, guide development of youth peer programs, educate the behavioral health community about supporting LGBTQIA individuals, and advocate for appropriate and equitable suicide prevention and intervention for youth. Rowan has 10 years of experience connecting and mentoring young adults with lived experience in behavioral health service settings to peer support career pathways and leadership opportunities on community, state, and national levels. Rowan has supported numerous organizations and groups with the process of developing or strengthening their youth serving programs and always strives to ensure that youth voice and youth engagement are at the focus of the work.
Published: June 13, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Four years after the onset of the pandemic, there continues to be upheaval throughout many different job sectors, including the behavioral health field. Leaders and Supervisors across sectors are often challenged by the task of forming and leading a cohesive team culture that is oriented around the goals of the organization. Turnover, hybrid and remote work, and burnout have contributed to a loss of cohesion within working groups. This webinar will present practical strategies from organizational psychology and best practices for workplace leaders when it comes to the facilitation of cultural change and development within their groups to get moving together in the same direction. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides FACILITATOR Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates in Everett and Edmonds, WA, is a Teaching Professor at Seattle University and formerly served as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health throughout the COVID response. She also owns Astrum Health LLC, and consults with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities. Dr. Mauseth has provided training to community groups and professionals both regionally and abroad as the co-developer of the Health Support Team© program. Her work and research focus on disaster behavioral health, resilience, and recovery from trauma as well as small and large-scale critical incident response and preparation for organizations. She has worked abroad extensively with disaster survivors and refugees in Haiti, Jordan and Poland, and has trained first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States, and currently serves in the adult mental health clinical seat on Washington State’s Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC). Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: June 13, 2024
Multimedia
Please note: This recording will be available until July 13, 2024.   “There is no health without mental health.”  – World Health Organization (WHO) The notion of integrated care in the field of healthcare has evolved over time. Historically, integrated care referred to the integration of mental health and addictions treatment, which is now called behavioral health. Today, integrated care refers to the integration of behavioral health and physical health. Integrated care is a best practice for supporting person-centered holistic healthcare due to the use of interprofessional collaboration with a focus on achieving the Quintuple Aim in healthcare. There is an expanding lens of integrated care beyond biomedicine that incorporates co-production of knowledge. This 90-minute virtual session will cover what constitutes integrated care, the shift from fee-for-service to value-based care, the collaborative care model, resource hubs, practice frameworks, and expanding perspectives on this evolving approach to care.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Be able to define integrated care within the context of mainstream medicine Learn about the Collaborative Care Model as an integrated care best practice Understand integrated care practice frameworks and expanding care perspectives   PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: June 12, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Examine distress tolerance skills for navigating a crisis and intense emotions Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.
Published: June 12, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording   Event Description Join us in welcoming Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT, Director of Caring Connections, as she presents a timely and informative overview of the Caring Connections program. Caring Connections: A Hope and Comfort in Grief Program is based in the University of Utah College of Nursing and is a leading community resource for grief and bereavement support.  Caring Connections provides grief care and education for clinicians and students and contributes to the scientific evidence to support best practices. In this one-hour training, participants will also learn about the nuances and impacts of traumatic grief, particularly as it relates to loss by suicide or overdose. Traumatic deaths, such as suicide or death by overdose, are on the increase and have a far-reaching impact on immediate survivors and communities. An estimated 47,000 persons die by suicide in the United States annually. For every death by suicide, 135 persons—family members or friends—are impacted. While almost 42,000 people in the United States died from opioids in 2016, and that number continues to increase.   Unaddressed traumatic grief can negatively impact both individual and community mental health. Recognizing and working with the stigma and trauma attached to these deaths benefits everyone. Grief is highly individualized. This means that each person responds to grief differently according to:   How the family member or friend was lost  The grieving person’s personality  Social norms within the grieving person’s culture and family  Other stressors in the grieving person’s life  The grieving person’s history of coping with other losses  The target audience for this training includes first responders, behavioral health clinicians, social workers, addiction counselors, crisis workers, and those whose work brings them into contact with persons impacted by traumatic death.    Trainer Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT 
Published: June 12, 2024
Multimedia
The South Southwest MHTTC and the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health hosted a webinar on Reflective Supervision, specifically designed for newcomers or those with up to three years of experience. The webinar is focused on early childhood mental and behavioral health providers in HHS Region VI states: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Nat Vikitsreth, a nationally recognized decolonized therapist, trans rights activist, and podcast host, was the honored speaker and trainer. The webinar is meant to help early childhood providers understand Reflective Supervision's importance for growth, connection, and effective care. About the Facilitator Nat Vikitsreth, LCSW Nat Vikitsreth, LCSW (she/her) works as a nationally award-winning decolonized therapist and facilitator, a trans rights activist, and host of the Come Back to Care Podcast. She founded Come Back to Care to help anyone who loves and raises children to heal as they get free. 
Published: June 10, 2024
Presentation Slides
  Join us for an informative webinar focused on Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMADs). Delve into crucial topics for understanding and addressing mental health challenges during the perinatal period. Our expert speaker will cover the prevalence, signs, and symptoms of common mental disorders experienced by birthing parents. Discover valuable insights into recognizing the signs of Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder symptoms and exploring practical coping and management strategies. We'll discuss a range of resources available to expecting parents and their families, empowering them with actionable steps to navigate the perinatal journey with resilience and support   Presenter: Marianela Rodriguez, PhD, PMH-C, is a mother, Certified Lactation Educator, and Clinical Psychologist certified in Perinatal Mental Health. For the past 15 years, she has worked exclusively in the perinatal mental health field. She is a PSI Volunteer Coordinator in Puerto Rico and an international trainer with the organization. She is a psychology consultant for the Puerto Rico Health Department, Mother, Child, and Adolescent Section (Title V) and a member of the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Board (FIMR). She provides supportive psychotherapy for PLWHIV at the Center for Maternal Infant Studies at the University of Puerto Rico. In 2020, she co-founded the first Center for Perinatal Mental Health in Puerto Rico, focusing on research, awareness, and service for this population.
Published: June 10, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: Mental Health Awareness Month is not just about community awareness, or being aware of the people around us. For those of us living in mental health recovery, being aware of ourselves—being able to hear, see, and interpret the signals our body and mind send us—is ​an important part of maintaining our recovery. Waiting for others to observe and comment on perceived changes in us can unnecessarily extend or even increase negative impacts of mental health concerns. In this on-demand recording, presenters discuss the benefits of having a self-care plan for daily living that is not crisis-focused, but a strengths-based approach that emphasizes nurturing wellness and strengthening resilience in manageable moments throughout the day.
Published: June 10, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our June 2024 newsletter features new upcoming Northwest MHTTC events and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce. Some highlights include: Age-Friendly Healthcare: Mentation’s 3 Ds (Dementia, Delirium, and Depression) Healthy Connections to Overcome Addictions And More!
Published: June 10, 2024
Multimedia
This is a recording of Session 1, entitled, Trauma-Informed Care Meets Healing-Centered Care in the series, "Rooting Young Adult Mental Health Services in Culturally Sustaining Values & Practices". The program centered services and supports for youth and young adults of transition age. Co-facilitated by the Pacific Southwest MHTTC’s Youth & Young Adult Program Team Lead, Oriana Ides, and Falilah Bilal, this four-part series offered a forum for dialogue to deepen practitioner’s ability to provide healing care to transitional-aged young people who access mental health and community-based services in Region 9 and beyond. Through generative conversation, expert panel discussions, active learning experiences, and the exploration of tangible action steps, the co-facilitators expanded the existing orientation to the work providers do with transitional aged youth to encompass a more culturally sustaining and affirming approach. This second session in the series asked: How might we create safe and brave spaces to uplift the wisdom and leadership of historically targeted identities in healing work? Viewers of this video may benefit from the following learning objectives: How to create brave and safe spaces for young people who are historically oppressed Teaching advocacy to young people to ensure they know their rights and how to heal through oppression Incorporate ways to implement healing-centered care within the workplace to work against oppression
Published: June 6, 2024
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