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eNewsletter or Blog
The fourth issue of our April newsletter features the Northwest MHTTC Year 5 Annual Report Summary, spotlights upcoming Northwest MHTTC events, and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: April 22, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dear Friends, We want to inform you that the MHTTC School Mental Health supplement will not continue after September 2024. SAMHSA funding has ended without a future opportunity.  For six years, the Northwest MHTTC School Mental Health team has served the school mental health workforce in Region 10 (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington) by curating timely and regionally-responsive events, developing tools for those in the field, and distributing critical resources. Rest assured that you can continue to access MHTTC school mental health materials, along with a broad array of additional ones, through the NWMHTTC SMH team’s home organization, the University of Washington School Mental Health Assessment, Research and Training (SMART) Center. While the supplement continues through the end of September, we invite you to start connecting with the SMART Center now. Join the UW SMART Center mailing list to continue receiving resource-rich newsletters Follow us on Facebook Engage with us on X/Twitter  Connect with us on LinkedIn Subscribe to our YouTube channel  Bookmark the UW SMART Center website From our team to yours, thank you for your partnership over the past six years. We couldn't have done it without you and credit your engagement, feedback, and support for our collective success.      “Don’t be dismayed at good-bye. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends.”    – Richard Bach, Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah  Make sure to sign up for the SMART Center newsletter to stay up to date on all things school mental health. If you have additional questions about the transition, please reach out to [email protected]. In gratitude, The NWMHTTC SMH Team Kelcey Schmitz, Eric Bruns, Clynita Grafenreed, Casey Chandler, Jennifer Cohen, Elsa Ferguson, Nathaly Florez, Mari Meador, and Rayann Silva
Published: April 19, 2024
Multimedia
Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working within schools and school districts and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world while decreasing negative physical, emotional, and psychological outcomes. This webinar will also focus on existing policies within school systems and assess how those policies impact access to equitable and high quality mental and behavioral health care for communities of color. Attendees will walk away with strategies for how to discuss these topic areas with their students and how to support students who are coping with complex cultural issues in developmentally appropriate ways.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define racial stress and trauma and Provide examples of how racial stress and trauma can occur in schools Identify the systems & policies within schools that impact student health and wellness Understanding the role of implicit bias in school systems & policies   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTERS: Nicole L. Cammack, PhD Dr. Nicole L. Cammack is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Media Contributor, and the Founder, President and CEO of Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Howard University and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University. Lastly, she completed a specialized Postdoctoral Fellowship, with the National Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine. Dr. Cammack is passionate about mental health awareness, treatment, and reducing the mental health stigma, particularly as it relates to Black communities. This passion is what led to the development of Black Mental Wellness, Corp an organization of clinical psychologists passionate about shifting the narrative of mental health in the Black community. In addition, she is a co-author of, Healing Racial Stress Workbook for Black Teens: Skills to Help You Manage Emotions, Resist Racism, and Feel Empowered. Her work has been featured in Huffington Post, Essence, People, Thrive Global, Good Housekeeping, Salesforce, and Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature). In addition, she was recognized as a 40 under 40 Honoree with the Leadership Center for Excellence and recognized through her work at Fort Meade and the Department of the Army with an Achievement Medal for Civilian Service. Danielle R. Busby, PhD Dr. Danielle Busby is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Author, Educator, and Co-Founder and Vice President of Professional Relations of Black Mental Wellness Corp. She received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the George Washington University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship, with a child trauma specialization, at Duke University’s Medical Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at Michigan Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Busby is passionate about decreasing barriers to mental health service use for underserved patient populations and is committed to continuously bridging the gap between research and clinical practice. Her research and clinical work are centered on examining barriers to mental health service use, specifically among Black youth who are at an elevated risk for suicide. She has led and contributed to scholarly articles and research on child trauma, youth suicide prevention, racial discrimination among Black youth, and the psychological effects of neighborhood stressors, such as, community violence exposure among Black adolescents. Dr. Busby and her work has been featured in NBC News, People, Women’s Health, Parents, Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature), PsychAlive, and WJLA news. Additionally, she is an awarded recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. She is a proud member of the American Psychological Association’s Leadership Development Institute, SelfSea Digital Wellbeing Advisory Board, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she has served for over 15 years. Dr. Busby was born in Detroit, MI and raised in Southfield, MI. She loves early morning yoga, college football Saturdays, and traveling with her close family and friends.   This event is being held in partnership with Black Mental Wellness.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia
By the end of this webinar, participants were able to describe: The nature of insight and treatment engagement in psychotic disorders An overview of the causes of impaired insight and treatment engagement in psychotic disorders. Approaches to management of impaired insight and treatment engagement/alliance in psychotic disorders.   Presenter: ​​Dr. Keshavan is Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, as well as Academic Head of the department. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Schizophrenia Research (Elsevier) and serves on the editorial board for journals such as Early Intervention in Psychiatry and Asian Journal of Psychiatry. His main areas of research include the neurodevelopmental basis of schizophrenia, neuroimaging, and early intervention. He has an active clinical practice.   This webinar was co-hosted by the Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET, www.mapnet.online).
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic. The topic for webinar session 2 was "Co-Creation of the PCRP Document-Partnering, Goal Discovery & Emphasis on Real Life Results." At the end of the series, participants will be able to: Define PCRP and its essential elements Increase familiarity with existing and emerging state and federal requirements regarding PCRP Articulate a minimum of three differences between traditional methods of treatment planning and best-practice PCRP Learn more about how the MHTTC PCRP Consultation Corner series can provide tools and resources to support the implementation of PCRP at your organization Presenters: Janis Tondora and Amy Pierce   Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs. More information about the series.
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia
This is a recording of Workshop 4 of 6 in the "Trauma-Informed, In School Sessions" Workshop Series.  Counseling with Care: Trauma Informed School Counseling Practices Trauma Informed Principle to Practice: Peer Support, Empowerment   Are you a school counselor, becoming a school counselor, or someone who teams/works with school counselors? Zeyda Garcia, founder of Healing Aguas Wellness Solutions and school counseling professor, joined this series to share how to anchor and apply trauma-informed principles in school counseling practices, programs, and policies. In the workshop video, she discusses a high-level overview of trauma, its impacts on students, and different strategies school mental health providers can implement to support young people in counseling settings.   Utilizing trauma informed school counseling practices, providers can support young people in regulating their own nervous system and support them in accessing their education. Watch this workshop video and join in reflections on our unique school and personal practices, in order to enhance our trauma-informed support of students.   Viewers will walk away with practical tools to use in sessions with students, families, and school-wide. Most importantly, and in Zeyda’s words, this workshop aims to offer school counselors “more creativity, courage and confidence in yourself as a counselor and a commitment to caring for yourself.”
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more and register for upcoming events in the series here. Bullying Prevention in Elementary and Middle Schools: Foundations and Student Ownership Description: Session attendants will learn about school readiness for bullying prevention, what staff and students can do to create a safe school climate, and how school members and students can teach and reinforce prosocial behaviors.   Objectives Core features of bullying prevention  Increasing student buy-in and ownership  Examples of student ownership from exemplar districts    Presentation Materials Recording Available Here! About the Presenter: Rhonda Nese, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences Scientist, Prevention Science Institute Affiliate Faculty, Prevention Science Program   Rhonda Nese, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences at the University of Oregon and the Director of the Nese Lab. She is also a Scientist within the Prevention Science Institute, a multidisciplinary research institute at the University of Oregon. Dr. Nese’s research involves equitable intervention delivery within a multi-tiered behavior support framework focused on preventative strategies for improving student outcomes.​ Dr. Nese currently serves as the director of an IES grant to refine and test an intervention to reduce exclusionary discipline practices, improve student-teacher relationships, and increase instructional time for students in secondary settings, and co-principal investigator on additional federally-funded projects to identify factors that predict implementation and sustainability of evidence-based practices, to develop technology to improve online learning for educators, and to develop and validate an automated scoring system for oral reading fluency. Dr. Nese also provides technical assistance to state, district, and school level teams across the nation on preventative practices, including addressing implicit bias in school discipline, effective classroom behavior management strategies, bullying prevention, and alternatives to exclusionary discipline practices through the OSEP-funded National TA-Center on PBIS. Dr. Nese is the recipient of the 2022 Presidential Equity Award from the NorthWest PBIS Network and the 2022 Outstanding Early Career Award from the University of Oregon, the UO’s highest award for early career faculty to recognize and celebrate an emerging and significant record of scholarship and research.      Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: April 17, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon!   Event Description Reducing access to lethal means, such as firearms, can determine whether a person at risk for suicide lives or dies. This session will provide rationale for lethal means safety, recommendations on who and when should receive lethal means safety information, and an introduction to lethal means counseling for Veterans at risk for suicide. In addition, the session will provide information on basic firearm safety and safe storage practices.  Trainers Chad Pitts & Sarah Kemp-Tabbut   Chad Pitts is a Veteran of the U.S. Army with over 10 years of organization and program management experience. He is currently the Program Manager for ND HOPES, a suicide prevention project in Western ND focused on Veterans, LGBTQIA2S+ youth, and rural residents. Chad has previously held positions within the NDUS focused on equity and diversity initiatives for disproportionately affected populations including LGBTQIA2S+ and Veterans. While in the Army Chad served as the Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge for multiple domestic and global missions with the 82nd Airborne Division.   Sarah Kemp Tabbut is the Community Engagement and Partnerships Coordinator at the Fargo VA.  She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 8 years of hands-on and public health experience in mental health and suicide prevention.  Sarah is well-versed in suicide prevention best practices, including safety planning, lethal means safety, and community-based interventions and is a Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) Trainer.  She also partners throughout North Dakota with communities to create and strengthen community coalition efforts for mental health, suicide prevention, and Veteran/Military issues. 
Published: April 17, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This 2-hour webinar will focus on enhancing participants’ ability to improve an individual's motivation and engagement in treatment. Participants will learn ways to empower their clients to change by drawing out their meaning, importance, and capacity for change. The hope is that through these methods, participants will gain tools and knowledge to help motivate their clients to improve their health and wellness, live self-directed lives, and strive to reach their full potential. Offered in collaboration with Lewis Family Consulting. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Motivation in Recovery slides Word Clouds generated by webinar participants   FACILITATOR Lamarr Lewis, MA, LAPC, CPRP Lamarr Lewis is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert and trainer for such organizations as; Boeing, Fulton County Probate Court, Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Region IV Public Health Training Center, the Ruby Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, and more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. Visit the Lewis Family Consulting website here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: April 17, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Leading, managing and supervising in the behavioral health field can be demanding work, requiring attention, organizational skills, quick thinking and creative problem solving. With all of these demands, it can be difficult to remain stable and flexible, while navigating interpersonal relationships, in and out of work. Individuals can often feel discouraged and frustrated, which can affect desired outcomes and add another layer of personal stress. Leading and advocating for change is intense work. All too often, an individual's mental health and wellness will take a back seat, and over time, burnout can occur. In this training a broader picture is revealed as we examine personal responses to life through a Polyvagal lens. With a collection of fresh ideas, plus a bit of tender encouragement, participants can discover new nervous system awareness, resilience and some much needed soul-nurturing to inspire confidence for the challenges of leadership and advocacy. Learning Objectives Understand the foundations of polyvagal theory Self-identify personal nervous system states through a polyvagal lens Cultivate broader awareness and connection with self and others Gain increased skill and confidence for effective leadership and advocacy ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides Rhythm of Regulation  - Deb Dana Website  Published Works — Rhythm of Regulation - Published works by Deb Dana (i.e. Anchored, Polyvagal Theory in Therapy and Polyvagal Card Deck)  “The Pocket Guide to Polyvagal Theory” - by Dr. Stephen Porges  “Activate Your Vagus Nerve: Unleash your body's natural ability to heal” - by Dr. Navaz Habib  FACILITATORS Rebekah Demirel, L.Ac MPCC Rebekah Demirel L.Ac. MPCC, is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs, with more than a decade as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years as a paramedic trainer, eighteen years of mental health counseling experience, specializing in traumatic stress, and she is a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: April 16, 2024
Other
It is imperative to create and maintain a safe, comfortable, open, and welcoming work environment with opportunities for learning and growth for organizations.  When considering a safe and supportive work environment, we must stress the importance of leaders who embrace and prioritize person-centered approaches. Creating a positive workplace challenges our individual and collective beliefs on what may be needed to create and sustain healthy work environments. Although there is no one answer, this resource can be helpful when building this environment within your organization.
Published: April 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third issue of our April newsletter introduces our new webinar series on sexual health, spotlights upcoming Northwest MHTTC events, and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: April 15, 2024
Print Media
Description: For those who grew up associating drugs with natural sources like marijuana plants, poppy fields, and cocoa leaves, it can be tough to keep up with the shift to synthetic drugs made of chemicals some people may not know they’re ingesting. This workshop will help participants understand the current drug landscape, including stimulants (e.g. methamphetamine and cocaine), powerful opioids like fentanyl and nitazines, and xylazine, an animal tranquilizer increasingly showing up in the drug supply in some regions. It will also cover drug use trends, such as increasing polysubstance use, higher potency drugs, and the risks of mixing illicit drugs, alcohol, and medications. Participants will learn about factors that have contributed to rising overdose rates—including nonfatal overdoses—strategies to minimize risks, and how to recognize and respond to an overdose, as well as where to obtain naloxone. Goals: Increase participants’ awareness of current drug use patterns, the increasing potency of both plant-based and synthetic drugs, and how to prevent, recognize, and respond to an overdose. Workshop Outline: Discuss drug use trends (increasing polysubstance use, shift to synthetics vs. plant-based drugs, mixing prescription medications & illicit drugs, increasing stimulant use). Present graphics depicting increasing strength and potency of illicit drugs (cannabis, methamphetamine, etc.) and effects of different drugs. Overview of fentanyl and xylazine as well as other drugs like nitazines + kratom. Overdose statistics and definitions (opioid vs stimulant ODs). Risk factors for an overdose (including nonfatal overdoses). Strategies to reduce overdose risks. Signs of an overdose. Naloxone – brief overview and where to get it, plus sources for additional training. Good Samaritan laws protecting people who respond to an overdose. Trainer Bio Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism.
Published: April 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The April 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating National Minority Health Month and Alcohol Awareness Month. It also features links to upcoming trainings focused on supporting Black students experiencing racial trauma, harnessing AI for substance misuse prevention, and process improvement. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: April 12, 2024
Interactive Resource
The Comprehensive School Mental Health Case Examples Training Packet was developed to be utilized with multi-disciplinary school teams, including building, district, and/or community professionals, who are tasked with assessing the academic, mental, and behavioral health needs of students.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: The Community Resiliency Model (CRM)® is a skills-based wellness and prevention program that provides a biological, non-stigmatizing perspective on human reactions to stress and trauma. The primary focus of this stabilization program is to learn to reset the natural balance of the nervous system, using the body itself. CRM skills help people understand their nervous system and learn to track sensations connected to their own wellbeing. This low-intensity intervention teaches easy-to-learn skills to manage difficult emotions which can be brought on by stressful personal or professional situations. In this 1.5 hour on-demand recording, presenters share their knowledge of concepts to understand their own and others' stress responses and the skills to regain emotional balance when buffeted by strong negative emotions.
Published: April 11, 2024
Presentation Slides
In this learning session, we: Provided an overview of the School Mental Health (SMH) Implementation Guidance Modules (including related learning extension materials, such as the SHAPE System, SMH Best Practices ‘Always and Now” Learning Series, and SMH Quality Guides), and shared how the modules are intended to be utilized by states, districts, and schools in their SMH implementation efforts. Provided specific examples of training and technical assistance that the Mid-America and South Southwest MHTTCs have provided/are providing utilizing the modules as a foundation, to support states, districts, and schools in their SMH implementation efforts. The session included a 10-minute question & answer portion with the presenters. Please note: This session was open to Project AWARE grantees only. It was developed with the new 2023 AWARE cohort in mind, but AWARE grantees from all cohorts were welcomed to attend.
Published: April 11, 2024
Multimedia
This recording is from Workshop 3 of 6 in the "Trauma-Informed, In School Sessions" Workshop Series.  This video recording provides an exploration of Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET), an evidence-based approach tailored for adults or children, particularly refugees and immigrants, with multiple traumatic experiences. Kids Narrative Exposure Therapy (KIDNET) is a therapy designed for children and adolescents who have experienced trauma, especially in conflict zones. KIDNET therapy focuses on reprocessing traumatic memories by contrasting the memories with the present feelings through narration. It focuses on helping them process their traumatic memories by creating a "lifeline" and uses techniques like storytelling, art, and role-play to aid in healing and recovery.   Led by Dr. Alejandra Acuña, this workshop guided participants towards a comprehensive understanding of NET's principles and techniques, learning how to utilize storytelling to help students process and integrate traumatic memories resulting in reduced PTSD symptoms. Viewers will walk away equipped with practical strategies and insights to provide culturally responsive support to students, fostering resilience and facilitating healing within diverse educational settings (e.g., green lights, yellow lights, and red lights of NET implementation!).   Importantly, Dr. Acuña shared not only about the evidence based approach, but how the implementation of it in itself can and should be trauma-informed and culturally responsive so that students and their families experience their recovery through the trauma-informed principles of empowerment and collaboration.
Published: April 11, 2024
Print Media
Northwest MHTTC is proud to present its Year 5 Annual Report Summary, which captures a brief snapshot of the Center's reach from September 2022 - September 2023. This includes the main "core" grant as well as a continued School Mental Health supplement. Every year Northwest MHTTC provides training and technical assistance to the behavioral health workforce in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. In Year 5 of our operations, we reached over 14,000 people through 150 free trainings, webinars, implementations, and other events. The result? Almost 97% of participants would recommend our trainings! Here's just some of what you'll discover in our Annual Report Summary: Core Grant Activities Learn about our work in Evidence-Based Practices for Psychosis, Intensive Training and Technical Assistance, and Responding to Regional Needs & Fostering Diverse Alliances School Mental Health Supplement Activities Discover our work in Building Systems to Support the Mental Health and Well-Being of Educators, our Alaska Workshops, and Trainings. Here are other reports concerning the Northwest MHTTC's recent work: Northwest MHTTC Year 5 Summary Northwest MHTTC School Mental Health Year 1-5 Supplement Summary  
Published: April 10, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Bipolar Disorder in the Black Community, originally held on March 21, 2024. View Slides
Published: April 10, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Myth-busting & Skill Building for Treating Binge Eating Disorder, originally held on March 28, 2024. View Slides
Published: April 10, 2024
Multimedia
This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and communities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity, participants will learn: Why advocacy is critical to social justice and behavioral health equity for marginalized communities What are the barriers and facilitators to engaging in advocacy   TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT
Published: April 9, 2024
Multimedia
To access resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Studies have estimated that it takes approximately 17 years for research to inform practice. Implementation science is the systematic study of methods to improve the translation of research to practice. There are many implementation science studies within youth mental health that have focused on therapist training, dissemination campaigns, and cost-effectiveness of training in particular interventions based on community appropriateness. This training will go over implementation science theories, methods, and frameworks that anyone can use to guide an implementation effort. Practical examples in youth mental health implementation within school-settings will be used to highlight innovative ways people can use implementation science in their own work. Learning Objectives Define implementation science, applied implementation, and implementation research Understand theories, frameworks, and models that comprise implementation research Learn from practical school-based implementation efforts for youth mental health Commit to one action that aligns with implementation science principle Trainers Kelsie Okamura Kelsie Okamura (she/her) is an Implementation Researcher at the Baker Center for Children and Families, a Harvard Medical School affiliate, and a licensed psychologist. Dr. Okamura serves on the training, consultation, and distance learning development teams at PracticeWise, LLC. She received her BA in Psychology with Honors and PhD from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Dr. Okamura completed her predoctoral internship at I Ola Lāhui Rural Hawai‘i Behavioral Health and postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania Center for Mental Health. Dr. Okamura was both a NIMH Child Intervention, Prevention and Services (CHIPS) and Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH) fellow; and has more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. She currently serves as Leader for the ABCT Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group and is a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Advisory Group Member to Implementation Research and Practice. Dr. Okamura is passionate about community-based public-sector service system implementation, particularly (a) knowledge formation, (b) quality improvement initiatives that bridge team-based technology, and (c) financial strategies to improve implementation. She is currently funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (Co-PI, System of Care Expansion Award), and has received funding through the National Institute for General Medical Services, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and American Psychological Foundation. As a fourth-generation daughter of Japanese and Okinawan immigrants to Hawaiʻi, Dr. Okamura has a deep appreciation of understanding diversity, culture, and contexts as they apply to youth mental health implementation. Growing up in a rural town in Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi has afforded her insight into the complexities of socioeconomic and cultural barriers that may impede successful implementation of youth psychosocial interventions.   Summer Pascual Summer Pascual (she/her) is an Implementation Research Assistant at The Baker Center for Children and Families, Implementation Research Division. Summer grew up in California and graduated cum laude from Western Washington University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology in 2021. She was also the 2021 recipient of the WWU Presidential Scholar Award for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences as a testament to her exceptional scholarship and service to the university and community. Her undergraduate clinical research focused on eating disorders, body image, and community-based work with underserved populations. In her time at WWU, Summer also researched race, culture, and prejudice. Her understanding of equity and oppressive systems is at the forefront of all her work, and she carries this with her into her current position. At the Baker Center, Summer has worked on several implementation research projects such as the implementation evaluation of a case management system in a publicly-funded mental health system. In conjunction with her work in the IRD, she also supports various implementation projects in the Quality Care Initiative including MATCH and PCIT Learning Collaboratives. Part of her time is spent providing administrative support to the Baker Center’s internship, practicum student, and postdoc training programs. Her passion for developing, implementing, and improving mental health services for underserved communities drives all of her work.
Published: April 9, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: Georgia has had a reputation for being a standard bearer of peer support for many years, and that reputation has been on display over the past 36 months with the launch of the new national 988 and 988lifeline.org. In this series, '988 in Every State', presenters will do a deep dive into what 988 is—its purpose, history, goals, and mechanics, taking micro and macro views of the system by speaking with front line Certified Peer Specialists answering calls and administrators behind the scenes who helped envision and build out Georgia’s response. Throughout the 988 buildup and rollout, Georgia—who already had connected statewide crisis, resource, and warmline telephone support — provided guidance and insight to other states and national leaders. Join staff from the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network as they share their insight and experience throughout this three-part series.
Published: April 9, 2024
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