Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT This 90-minute webinar will showcase the journey of recovery through the holistic concept of mind and body connection. Alano Club Board Members and Run TRG founders, Yassine Diboun and Mike Grant, will show us how their creative programs, offered through the Alano Club of Portland, Oregon, have become beacons of light for those in or seeking recovery. The connections and support gained through their community aims to improve participants’ holistic well-being; including physical, mental, spiritual, emotional and behavioral health, all while having fun and digging deep. Participants will learn about the Alano Club organization and how they are re-defining recovery support and personal well-being through physical exercise. RESOURCES Presentation slides "In Philadelphia, a run club helps those recovering from addiction find purpose," NPR Self-compassion books by Kristin Neff More from Mike & Yassine: The Recovery Gym, Wy'EastWolfpack FACILITATORS Yassine Diboun Yassine Diboun is a sponsored ultra runner, co-owner of the popular Portland-based fitness and coaching firm Wy’east Wolfpack & holds a Bachelor of Science in Health Studies: Physical Activity/Exercise from Portland State University. Since getting sober in 2004 Yassine has made his presence felt in the competitive running world, mostly gravitating towards trail and mountain ultramarathons. He routinely places near the top of the field in some of the most difficult American and international events. In 2015, Yassine was one of five American runners who represented the USA at the IAU World Trail Championships in Annecy, France, where the team went on to take the silver medal. Despite all of this, Yassine is most proud of the accomplishment of staying sober and being present for life one day at a time. He lives close to the trails with his wife, daughter, and furry family members!  Mike Grant, LCSW, CADC-II Mike Grant is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in both Oregon and Washington and a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor with expertise in trauma therapy and addiction treatment. He holds certifications as an Ultrarunning Coach, further enhancing his ability to support athletes in overcoming mental barriers to achieve their performance goals. Currently, Mike serves as a hospital-based addictions therapist at Kaiser Permanente in Portland, OR. In addition to his work at Kaiser, Mike operates Aid Station Therapy, a private practice that specializes in trauma therapy utilizing EMDR and Brainspotting modalities. Through Aid Station Therapy, Mike provides a compassionate and supportive environment for individuals seeking healing and growth. Outside of his professional commitments, Mike is passionate about promoting recovery and physical well-being. He is a founder of the RUN TRG running group, dedicated to creating a community for individuals in recovery. Mike's personal interests align with his professional endeavors, as he actively trains for ultra-marathons in his spare time. Above all, he cherishes spending quality time with his family, finding joy and balance in their presence. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: July 12, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT This webinar in partnership with Umbrella Collective will focus on mental health clinical information that seeks to be inclusive of LGBTQIA2S+ identities, authenticity, power, and difference in an anti-oppressive framework.‌‌‌ This training serves to increase critical awareness of overt and covert marginalization dynamics within personal lives, society, and within professional work within each organization/s. The goal is to build supportive resources and relationships within the culture of the self that extends to professional practice within organization/s that promote an inclusive, anti-oppressive stance to benefit everyone. Learning objectives: Develop an anti-oppressive lens toward LGBTQIA2S+ people in personal and professional life. Increase understanding of one’s role in upholding and maintaining systems of power over marginalized identities within society and at the organization/s. Build and deepen relationships within the group to hold one another accountable to LGBTQIA2S+ identities with anti-oppression growth goals and actionable steps. Deepen one’s knowledge and resource toolkit to have an LGBTQIA2S+ inclusive mindset in the face of overt and covert oppressions that occur in a day-to-day context within the work of the organization/s. For privileged identities, develop grounding techniques in the face of cis- and hetero- shame-based fragility to help facilitate engagement in difficult conversations‌.‌‌ For people with marginalized identities, develop health boundary setting when experiencing micro- and macro-aggressions in life and professional practice. Resources Slides Glossary of LGBTQIA2S+ Terms Health Care Experiences of Patients Discontinuing or Reversing Prior Gender-Affirming Treatments Questions to Self-Reflect - LoveHas No Labels FACILITATORS Li Brookens, LCSW, CGP, WPATH GEI SOC8 Certified Member (they/them) Li Brookens is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), Certified Group Psychotherapist (CGP), World Professional Association for Transgender Health SOC8 Certified Member, and a Clinical Hypnotherapist providing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) trainings to organizations as well as psychotherapy to individuals, families, and groups in private practice. Li is out personally and professionally as a trans, nonbinary, 2nd generation white-assumed Latine, able-bodied person. Out of a vision and drive to create a group practice that weaved intersectionality into the fabric of the dynamic work with each client, they founded Umbrella Collective (est. 2016). The Umbrella Collective is a private group psychotherapy and DEI training practice in Boulder CO.   Virginia Sanford, LPC (she/her) Virginia Sanford has worked with adolescents, adults and families in a range of different settings from wilderness and residential therapy to community mental health. She has worked extensively with adventure and equine therapy as a way to facilitate experiential growth and deepen relationships with self and the world around us. Virginia is passionate about working with grief and loss as it relates to trauma, identity, ability and the multitude of ways that we experience loss as humans. Change can be hard and it can be scary, but it can also be exciting and fulfilling. Virginia works to help create space to access the range of experiences that arise through the therapeutic process. Virginia's clinical approach draws from several theoretical orientations including Attachment based, Trauma informed and Client-Centered lens. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: July 11, 2024
Print Media
This publication (Revised June 2024) will help organizations and staff address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. It includes an array of resources that provide guidance about raising awareness, assessing competencies, implementing strategic planning, and advanced training.
Published: July 9, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Black & Brown Latinx Perinatal PTSD: What Behavioral Health Providers Need To Know, Session 2: Exploring Trauma During the Birthing Process and Its Impact on Black and Latinx Mothers Recording, originally held on 6/26/24. Slide presentation
Published: July 9, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Discuss interpersonal effectiveness skills for maintaining effective relationships, setting boundaries, and communicating needs Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.  
Published: July 9, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our July 2024 newsletter features new upcoming Northwest MHTTC events and resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: July 8, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
About this Resource: The Southeast MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events and recently released products as well as shares information on available resources from SAMHSA and the MHTTC network. The July 2024 issue promotes Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. This issue also highlights our upcoming events and recently developed products, celebrates efforts being done by Region IV states, and provides resources available through the MHTTC Network and SAMHSA to connect individuals to needed treatment and support.
Published: July 8, 2024
Print Media
About this Resource: Have you ever wondered about the role of the Certified Peer Specialist in the new 988 Crisis System? This product, which accompanies a webinar that the Southeast MHTTC hosted along with the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, explains the role of peers in answering calls, crisis coordination, support services teams, and respite centers.
Published: July 3, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT This 90-minute webinar aims to equip professionals in the mental health and addiction field with the skills needed to effectively supervise and support peer support specialists and other lived-experience professionals in behavioral health settings. These individuals provide a valuable service by drawing on their own experiences with recovery to inspire others, model effective coping strategies, and support engagement in services. However, supervising them presents unique challenges due to the specific nature of their roles and the central role that their personal experiences play in their work with others. Through this webinar, you will gain insights into the complexities and unique challenges that may arise when supervising these professionals and how best to support them in the peer role. Learning Objectives: Develop a comprehensive supervision plan tailored to the unique needs of peer support specialists and other lived-experience professionals in behavioral health settings. Enhance communication and collaboration to create a supportive and inclusive work environment. Foster resilience and self-care practices to prevent burnout and promote well-being. Apply ethical considerations and boundaries in supervision. Understand the importance of ongoing professional development and support. RESOURCES Presentation slides SAMHSA Self Assessment Guide for Supervisors of Peer Workers FACILITATOR Heath Holt Hayes Heath Holt Hayes is a globally recognized award winner for his work spearheading public service messaging for the 988 Mental Health Lifeline and is nationally credited for innovations around the use of vending machines for opioid abatement initiatives. Heath is a professional speaker, media producer and business entrepreneur specializing in infrastructure and capacity development in the mental health and addiction space. Heath previously served as the Deputy Commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, received a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Central Oklahoma and completed graduate degrees from the University of Oklahoma in Human Relations, Administrative Leadership, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Heath’s most important achievement is being the adoptive parent of three Choctaw American siblings.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: July 2, 2024
Multimedia
This presentation discussed the history of cognitive remediation and its early application in medical conditions. We also talked about how psychology and psychiatry have incorporated CR into their techniques to treat psychiatric disorders, including psychosis. This talk showed a couple of clinical cases to illustrate how cognitive remediation can improve social skills and neurocognition.   Presenter: Luis R. Sandoval, Ph.D. - Psychologist, Clinical Researcher at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School   Dr. Sandoval is a researcher and a clinician in the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Sandoval is a senior psychologist, supervisor, and researcher with an extensive background in mood, cognitive, and psychotic disorders. Dr. Sandoval has over 20 years of experience applying his expertise in multicultural settings, translating theoretical and clinical knowledge into clinical, research, and academic contexts in English and Spanish. Dr. Sandoval has led research studies and collaborated on NIH, NIMH, PCORI, and NASA-funded studies, mainly focusing on innovative treatments for cognitive issues in mood and psychosis disorders using computerized intervention. Dr. Sandoval has served as a senior clinical research consultant at the Yale School of Medicine, NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Hartford Hospital, McLean, BIDMC, The Guidance Center, UT-Austin, among others.   Dr. Sandoval's expertise includes applying cognitive remediation in medical conditions (i.e., Sturge Weber,  Epilepsy, TBI) and psychiatric conditions, including psychosis, depression, Bipolar Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorders, ADHD, and other neurocognitive illnesses. Additionally, Dr. Sandoval's research and clinical areas include digital psychiatry and psychodynamic psychotherapy.   As part of his research work, Dr. Sandoval trains and supervises clinicians in cognitive remediation treatments for early and chronic psychosis across the U.S. and how to improve cognition in medical and psychiatric conditions, combining digital tools with evidence-based therapies.
Published: July 1, 2024
Curriculum Package
The Healing and Transformation Learning Academy (HTLA) manual was created to provide guidance on facilitating this program. It is intended to facilitate a process of professional growth, and guide participants on their creation of a "final project." The manual is available at no cost through the download link on this page. The Healing and Transformation Learning Academy (HTLA) is founded on the principles of peer support, acknowledging and respecting the unique paths individuals have taken in their lives. Consequently, it does not have a predetermined outcome in mind. This framework empowers participants to explore unlimited pathways that will lead them to their intended destinations throughout their time in HTLA. Although this document provides detailed facilitator notes, the space is collaboratively created to meet individuals where they are. Email [email protected] for any Technical Assistance on the utilization and implementation of this program.
Published: July 1, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The first issue of our July 2024 newsletter features information about National Minority Mental Health Month, upcoming Northwest MHTTC events and resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: July 1, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Event Description The mental health fields have long been leaders in understanding and raising awareness of the importance of understanding power and privilege. Multiple critiques in the past decade, however, have suggested that an overly simplistic understanding of these constructs can impede personal and professional development in multicultural awareness and, as such, be detrimental to those with whom we work. Thus, in this presentation, nuanced understandings and analyses of power and privilege will be discussed on the basis of advancements in the anti-oppression and antiracism literature.    Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: July 1, 2024
Multimedia
Three unique perspectives…one unifying vision – a world in which every LGTBQ youth has access to an affirming school community where they feel safe, respected, and embraced.  We concluded Pride Month with a dynamic panel presentation offering insights from personal, parental, and professional perspectives borne out of groundbreaking work and advocacy in support of LGBTQ youth. Be inspired and learn ways that you can contribute to urgently needed culture and systems change! Overviewed common terminology and misconceptions of the non-binary and trans community Information about the current state of mental health and distress among LGBTQ youth Heard from experts with both lived and professional experience around the importance of gender-inclusive communities in supporting the wellness of LGBTQ youth Learned about ways to support and advocate for your LGBTQ child and maintain your wellness as a parent Heard about a range of practical school-based strategies for creating gender-inclusive, welcoming communities where LGBTQ youth can thrive Panelists Tony Ferraiolo is internationally known as a compassionate and empowering Life Coach who has earned his reputation as a thought-provoking and motivational speaker and trainer. Since 2005, Tony has worked with individuals, groups, and educational institutions to reach thousands of people worldwide. In 2008, he was the founder of multiple support groups for transgender and nonbinary youth and their families. The work Tony does has allowed him to see firsthand how children’s lives are transformed from hopelessness to hopefulness through the process of simply affirming their gender, and he has witnessed firsthand the positive impact that this has on them and their families. Tony is the subject of the award-winning documentary A Self-Made Man and the author of the book series Artistic Expressions of Transgender Youth. And his soon to be released memoir “Finding My Way Out of The Darkness.” He is the co-founder of the Jim Collins Foundation where he held the position of president of the board for ten years. Melissa Combs is the parent of two high school teens. Her journey through the public school system as the parent of a transgender child inspired her to launch the Out Accountability Project, an organization that aims to help schools create and maintain safe, affirming learning environments for LGBTQ+ youth. Professionally, she is a consultant and has worked with more than 50 nonprofits, primarily in fundraising, communications, and public relations. Christy Olezeski, PhD, is the Director and co-founder of the Yale Pediatric Gender Program (YPGP), an interdisciplinary team that provides services for transgender and gender expansive (TGE) youth and families in Connecticut. The team includes professionals in the fields of psychology, endocrinology, psychiatry, gynecology, reproductive medicine, medical ethics and law. The YGP mission is to provide comprehensive, interdisciplinary, family-centered care for children, adolescents and young adults questioning their assigned gender and/or seeking gender-affirming consultation and care in a compassionate, respectful and supportive environment. This program is regionally well-regarded, serving clients from all 8 counties in the state, as well as 7 states outside of Connecticut.  
Published: June 28, 2024
Multimedia
Event Description This program aims to equip behavioral health leaders with the essential skills and knowledge to effectively lead teams and foster healthier organizational cultures. Participants will learn strategic and people-focused leadership methods through “Authentic Connection.” The goal of this training series is to enhance their ability to navigate uncertainty, ambiguity, and conflict while maintaining resilience and composure in a rapidly changing behavioral health landscape.  Participants will learn:   -          Explore strategies for fostering wellness and resilience to develop a healthier work culture within their scope of influence.  -          Acquire practical skills in self-care, compassion, and inclusive strategies to integrate into their professional roles.  -          Learn communication strategies to collaborate with others to develop adaptive strategies to address challenges in diverse teams.    June 27 - Session 1: Healthy Teams: Collaborative Communication   To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording July 11 - Session 2: Healthy Teams: Reflective Supervision  To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! July 18 - Session 3: Healthy Cultures: Managing Systemic Burnout and Stress  Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! August 1 - Session 4: Healthy Cultures: Psychological Safety  Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon!   Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk).   He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University.   His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more.   His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. 
Published: June 27, 2024
Multimedia
Please note: This recording will only be available until July 26, 2024. The United Nations has set forth the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In part, these goals aim to advance “a plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity” and “realize the human rights of all” by centering global efforts on health equity. This 90-minute virtual session will define health equity, identify evidence-based practices supporting health equity, review priority populations affected by health inequities, and explain the far-reaching impact(s) caused by disparities in healthcare. We will also discuss other salient health equity topics including our evolution of understanding, an expanding unit of analysis, trauma-informed care, local-to-global (dis)connections, and policy-practice implications within the context of sustainable, collective futures.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of what health equity is and how it has evolved Identify the impact of health inequity and health disparity Learn policy and practice implications within the context of collective futures   PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: June 26, 2024
Multimedia
This June 25, 2024 webinar provided cultural considerations and tips for culturally responsive care when working with individuals who experience psychosis. Some of the learning goals of this webinar included: Understanding the pervasive impact of culture on engagement, rapport building, assessment, and treatment outcomes. Identifying strategies to work on becoming a culturally responsive, anti-oppressive clinician outside of the therapy room. Developing a framework of development that prepares you to Receive and Respond to Feedback from people with lived experience of various different social identities and backgrounds. Building an ethic of cultural humility that centers respectful curiosity and openness to unfamiliar cultural and social concepts across the spectrum of ability, gender, sexuality, race, and culture. Differentiating between cultural humility, cultural responsiveness, and cultural competence as broader concepts that must inform a holistic idea of cultural understanding. Presenters: Vera A. Muñiz-Saurré (they/éle) is a nonbinary, queer, Peruvian public health professional of mixed Spanish and Andean ancestry working as a Program Coordinator and Peer Advocate for the Massachusetts Psychosis Prevention Partnership (M3P) and Building Bridges towards Equity in Psychosis Intervention and Careers (2B-EPIC) grants at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a Peer Counselor at the Lab for Early Psychosis at McLean Hospital. Vera is diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder, a survivor of conversion therapy targeting their sexuality, and identifies as Mad and a psychiatric survivor. Starting in 2017, Vera helped found and admin the Psychosis Spectrum Server on Discord and still helps maintain that community! Vera’s ideology and public health approach centers abolition of long-standing oppressive systemic structures, investment in harm reduction-based support services, and reindigenization of academic knowledge systems in both theory and application. Chia Hsuan Sabrina Chang (she/her) is a psychologist, Instructor at Harvard Medical School, and site supervisor for Boston University's Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology. She is proud of her identities as a first-generation immigrant and Asian-American woman, especially in the predominantly white profession of psychology. She has published several peer reviewed papers and a book chapter on cultural psychology and gender affirming care. She is passionate about providing culturally responsive, anti-oppressive therapy and supervision, the latter of which earned her the Teaching and Mentorship Award from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She is the founder of the Anti-Racism Task Force at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center, which was bestowed the Performance Recognition Award by the Department of Mental Health. In the community, she is passionate about using her expertise as a psychologist to instigate anti-racist change and received a citation from the Massachusetts Senate for her advocacy work.
Published: June 26, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: As mental health care providers work to address the needs of individuals in their day-to-day work, it can be difficult to treat mental health challenges without also treating the underlying contributors to those challenges. The Social Determinants of Mental Health (SDOMH) are the non-medical societal factors that influence the mental health outcomes of patients, peers, and clients. These intersecting conditions in which a person is born, in which they age, live, and work, all factor into that person’s health. In this on-demand recording, clinicians learn how these factors impact engagement in care and how to measure these factors’ effect on patients’ outcomes in an effort to utilize more comprehensive and effective treatment strategies to address mental health needs.
Published: June 26, 2024
Presentation Slides
First-episode psychosis can strip away one's identity, obscure one’s history, and shatter one’s vision for the future. And often, this process happens through contact with the mental health system, rather than the condition itself. At just 17 years old, Leah Giorgini found herself navigating a descent to invisibility after a traumatic childhood marred with violence, neglect, and parental death led to a first episode of psychosis. Once a high achiever, Leah became a patient adrift from the world, paralyzed by antipsychotic medication and low expectations. However, when a progressive therapist lent Leah a book about Feminist Perspectives on Mental Health, Leah suddenly felt seen as a whole person in context and began to reemerge as a visible and capable individual. Now an Occupational Therapist working in nonprofit leadership, Leah is working to change the societal inequities that lead to and perpetuate human suffering. She will present her story and outline how connecting the dots of trauma, intersectionality, and occupation can lead to rights-based care that helps people feel seen and empowered.  By the end of this training, participants will be able to:  Describe the importance of acknowledging intersectionality in mental health care, particularly in understanding how various aspects of identity, such as gender, race, and socioeconomic status, intersect with experiences of psychosis and recovery.  Describe the role of occupation in the recovery process for individuals with first-episode psychosis, and understand how occupational therapy principles can be integrated into rights-based care approaches to support individuals in regaining agency and meaning in their lives.  Identify the key factors contributing to the social invisibility experienced by individuals with first-episode psychosis, including the impact of interactions with the mental health system.  About the Presenter: Leah is a British-Indonesian immigrant who moved from England to the United States in 2016. As a psychiatric survivor, domestic violence survivor, former foster youth, and a person who has previously experienced homelessness, Leah is working towards a world free of oppression and injustice. She believes that promoting psychological and social approaches to psychosis is equity in action towards this vision.  Trained as an Occupational Therapist, Leah primarily worked in clinical mental health settings until she came to the United States, where she found a home working in nonprofit leadership. Leah has worked in an array of settings with people diagnosed with psychosis, including working in early intervention in psychosis, assertive outreach, a mental health recovery café, a high-secure forensic hospital, and homeless emergency shelters. She currently serves as Executive Director of the US Chapter of the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS-US.)   
Published: June 25, 2024
Multimedia
Team dynamics can impact the care that is provided to young people in early psychosis programs. Fostering a positive dynamic can be challenging, and there are few trainings and resources to support early psychosis team leads in leadership and team dynamics. During this panel, early psychosis team leaders, Sharhonda Webster and Linda C Williams, will discuss how positive team dynamics can support individuals with early psychosis. They will discuss the potential impact of leadership styles and the importance of individualizing your leadership approach to each staff member, incorporating individual differences and culture. They will use their experience as team leaders to discuss considerations for managing team conflict, incorporating diverse perspectives, and changing team culture.   Learning objectives:   Understand how team dynamics can influence client care   Identify multiple considerations for early psychosis team leaders    Discuss how individual differences of team members can be incorporated to foster positive team dynamics     About the Presenters: Linda C Williams, LPC (she/her), Clinical Program Coordinator at the Spindletop Center in Beaumont, Texas. I received my calling to help others who experienced mental health issues in 2007 where I was part of a wonderful ministry serving the homeless called the Archangels Motorcycle Ministry. There I would speak face-to-face with those who needed mental health assistance but all I could do was provide them with resources. I wanted to do more so I went back to college to finish my educational journey. I started my professional journey working in mental health in 2014. I began my service work with children and adults with IDD ending in 2016, then with adults in the Crisis Stabilization Unit (CSU) ending 2018, with the Mobil Crisis & Outreach Team (MCOT) ending in 2021, and finally with the FEP unit known in the company as the Early Onset Program (EOP). Sharhonda Webster, LPC, (she/her) is a visionary leader who is passionate about serving and empowering vulnerable and at-risk individuals. She is the Coordinated Specialty Care Team Lead at Tri-County Behavioral Healthcare. She is an advocate for individuals who have been impacted by systematic oppression and committed to building environments where everyone has the opportunity to thrive. Her focus is on creating and building leaders who will positively impact the world, and being able to walk alongside them as they flourish. One of her favorite quotes that she lives by is “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” Martin Luther King Jr.
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
Psychosis is often understood as an illness that happens to people, a brain problem that has little to do with what has happened in that person’s relationships with others or in their relationship with themselves.  Much evidence however points to a different reality, where psychosis quite often follows traumatic experience that damages both social and intrapersonal relationships, and where recovery typically involves the restoration of healthy relationships with both external and internal “others.”  Treatment is different when we conceptualize psychosis as primarily a disturbance in relationships.  The goal then shifts from suppressing “symptoms of psychosis” to first finding healthy ways for us to relate to the person with psychosis and then ways to help them rebuild trust and constructive relationships with family, friends, and others including the parts of themselves from which they may have become alienated.  Let’s explore what is possible when working from this radically humanistic paradigm!    Learning Objectives: Discuss the evidence linking traumatic experiences with psychosis and the impact of trauma and psychosis on social and intrapersonal relationships.  Explain how a paradigm shift to viewing psychosis as relational alters treatment goals, orienting towards building healthy relationships instead of symptom suppression.  Explore compassionate and empathetic therapeutic strategies for helping individuals with psychosis rebuild connection with others and with alienated and dissociated parts of themselves.     About the Presenter: Ron Unger is a licensed clinical social worker, therapist, and consultant specializing in CBT and related approaches for psychosis.  For the past 2 decades he has been providing seminars on therapy for psychosis, working with the intersection of trauma and psychosis, and addressing cultural and spiritual issues within treatment for psychosis, at universities and mental health facilities across the United States and internationally.  His teaching aims to inspire and guide people to relate to the essential humanity in otherwise puzzling extreme states of mind, and to reveal possible pathways people can take toward recovery and healing.  He chairs the Pacific Northwest Branch of ISPS-US, and maintains a blog at recoveryfrompsychosis.org 
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
This presentation will explore ways to make meaning of experiences labeled as psychosis, as well as identify strategies for building partnerships to help navigate those experiences along the way. As we learn to pause and unpack not only our own purpose, but also the perspectives of those we are supporting, we can deepen our connections and more easily find the path to guide people toward becoming the experts of their own experiences in a way that works for them. Approaches from the Hearing Voices Movement and Intentional Peer Support will be introduced through the values of the Wildflower Alliance. Over a decade of working with people and their families – as well as a lifetime of first-hand experiences of voices, visions and unusual and extreme states – will inform the presentation.  Learning Objectives:  Participants will be able to name at least strategies for managing voices and extreme states beyond medication and distraction.  Participants will be able at least two ways trauma can impact the type of voices and unusual beliefs a person may have.  Participants will be able to name two dialogue approaches that increase connection and partnership    About the Presenter:  Cindy Hadge is an internationally recognized educator providing training and consultations to mental health providers, worldwide who are looking for innovative ways to approach voice-hearing, extreme states, and trauma. She draws from her own experience of childhood trauma, experiences in the traditional mental health system, and navigating her own voices, visions, and unusual beliefs. She is passionate about developing and facilitating healing spaces for those going through these kinds of experiences and their families. Cindy is a pioneer in developing Hearing Voices Network USA Family and Friends Groups in 2019 and has been an HVN USA trainer since 2012. Cindy is the Lead Trainer for the Wildflower Alliance as well as an Intentional Peer Support trainer.
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
In this 60-min session we will explore the common challenges providers face when supporting people who see, hear, and otherwise experience things that others around them do not. Tasked with time-sensitive concrete requirements, such as completing an eligibility assessment or person-centered recovery plan (PCRP), professionals may struggle to meet the needs of the behavioral health system while also prioritizing the more immediate and subjective needs of the human being in front of them. Join Amy and Amanda as they share from both their relevant personal and professional experience regarding this challenge and highlight ideas for staying connected with yourself and the people you support. Although the session is brief, attendees can expect story-telling, short examples, and a few take-home resources.  Learning Objectives: Describe two actions that promote trust and partnership during a mental health distress,  Name two behaviors professionals should avoid that can damage the relationship with people who are hearing and seeing things that others do not, and  Identify an approach that simultaneously balances the needs of the person and the system.    About the Presenters: Amanda Bowman, LCSW-S, PSS (she/her) is a clinical social worker, certified peer specialist supervisor, and WRAPⓇ facilitator, using her professional and lived experience with mental health challenges to promote person-centered practices in behavioral health care. Coming from direct social work practice and administrative leadership within the public mental health system, she joined Via Hope in 2013, where she served as Recovery Institute Director until 2023. In this role, she oversaw the development and delivery of organizational change programs, which included statewide initiatives to support the implementation of person-centered planning, peer support services, and trauma-responsive work environments. Now the owner of Sidecar Consulting, Amanda uses her passion for participatory learning methods to facilitate collaborative learning events and serves as a subject matter expert for programs designed to support change within and across agencies. She has called Austin home since 2000 when she moved from Louisiana to obtain a Master’s degree at UT. Outside of work, you may find Amanda with her family hiking the Barton Creek Greenbelt or enjoying live music. Amy Pierce (she/her) has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for almost two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Manager at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and  other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, implementing peer support programs in the community as well as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   Prior to Via Hope, she was the CEO of Resiliency Unleashed, an international training and consulting company. Amy is a peer, and family member, with both mental health and addictions experience. Amy was previously Chair of the PAIMI Council in Texas and currently serves on the Disability Rights Texas Board of Directors.
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
Living with a psychotic disorder can be an experience of uncertainty, isolation, and diminished hope for young people and their loved ones. For providers, supporting people with complex psychological conditions increases the risk of burnout. This presentation discusses how intentional kindness and community-building strategies are good medicine practices that can benefit young people with psychosis, families, and care teams.  This presentation challenges providers face to maintain spaces that support deep human connection: This presentation will discuss specific barriers and responses to barriers faced during the last three years to sustain and expand human connection among program participants and care team members.  Learning Objectives Have a greater understanding of the subtle and explicit ways how psychotic disorders impact a large network of people, to include young people experiencing symptoms, family members, and care providers.   Review the positive impact that kindness practices and intentional human connection have in people’s physical, mental and spiritual health.   Discuss specific ways how EPICenter (A FEP in Tucson Arizona) integrates kindness practices and community building initiatives as core components of their program.     About the Presenter: Gustavo Perez, PhD, (he/him) is a clinical associate professor at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Psychiatry Department where he directs the Early Psychosis Intervention Center (EPICenter). Dr. Perez's priorities include: Supporting young adults with serious mental illness in building a life of connection and purpose, advocating for families, preparing the next generation of providers to offer best diagnostic and intervention practices, and engaging with local communities to reduce stigma and increase opportunities for youth in different stages of psychotic disorder. Dr. Perez is a licensed psychologist and a certified trauma specialist. He completed his doctorate degree in school psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and his clinical psychology internship at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. Prior to joining the University of Arizona, Dr. Perez was the chief psychologist at the Pima County Juvenile Detention Center in Tucson AZ.
Published: June 25, 2024
1 2 3 161
Copyright © 2024 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network
map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down