Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Webinar/Virtual Training
Successful outcomes largely depend upon the quality of interpersonal relationships with people receiving services. Workers must maintain a balance between being supportive, empathic, and understanding, yet professional at the same time. In a trauma-informed and inclusive Human Services setting, monitoring the risk of boundary crossings and other ethical issues is a constant process for the worker. Since work scenarios are constantly in flux, the worker must be alert to possible boundary crossings and how to communicate effectively with clients and coworkers to prevent confusion and harm. This training explores the nature of boundary issues at work by looking at the five different risk areas for most staff, offering tips and best practices for reducing the risk of boundary problems in the workplace. This training also considers multiple scenarios to coach attendees on processes that reduce risk and protect workers and clients alike.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Review boundary concepts and terminology Examine ethical considerations with examples Introduce a decision-making process Adopt personal and professional interventions   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 2 continuing education (CE) hour certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work and the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER: Russ Turner, MA, Director of the People Incorporated Training InstituteDuring Russ’s 16-year tenure, he has written and taught thousands of hours of person-centered curriculum to help people become more effective helpers, communicators, and leaders. His audience includes workers and leaders across a wide range of organizations from human services, healthcare, and libraries, to law enforcement and corrections. He trains trainers, works with management, and has consulted and coached on training projects across multiple sectors of the economy. He has worked as an educator for three decades in a variety of countries and settings including Japan, the Czech Republic, and the UK. His teaching philosophy is that adults learn best when they are challenged, the material is applicable to work situations, and sessions are interactive and engaging.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
ABOUT THIS EVENT After the completion of this 90-minute webinar, participants will be better able to characterize dementia, delirium, and depression (the 3 Ds), identify key similarities and differences between these clinical syndromes, recognize warning signs, and initiate diagnostic work-up. Slides FACILITATOR Emily H. Trittschuh, PhD Dr. Emily Trittschuh is a clinical neuropsychologist and the Associate Director of Education & Evaluation with the Veteran Administration (VA) Puget Sound Healthcare System’s Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC). She is also a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She has specialized in neurodegenerative disease and geriatrics throughout her career. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis (CBT-P) is an evidence-based approach to support recovery for individuals experiencing psychosis. Case conceptualization can guide CBT-P individual treatment and team-based treatment in a multidisciplinary setting, such as a First Episode Psychosis (FEP) team. In these monthly case-based learning calls, First Episode Psychosis (FEP) Team Leads and Therapists in MHTTC Region 6 will practice using case conceptualization models for young people on their FEP teams. Each month, up to two providers will have the opportunity to present their case conceptualization and receive feedback from the group. Providers will be asked to submit their case conceptualization one week in advance of the call. Samantha Reznik, PhD, will facilitate the calls. Although the calls will practice using a CBT-P case conceptualization, other modalities may be integrated as clinically indicated by the conceptualization and an emphasis will be placed on shared decision-making and recovery-oriented approaches. Participants should expect to learn basic theory of CBT-P case conceptualization rather than to be competent in provision of full CBT-P. Further CBT-P training options will be discussed during the series.   Interested parties should register by completing this form by December 18, 2023 and expect to share at least one case conceptualization within the six-month series as well as having some materials to review in January. Applications will be reviewed and all applicants will be notified of the status of their selection by January 5, 2024. Accepted participants are expected to share at least one case conceptualization within the six-month series and will have some pre-work materials to review in January.   Facilitator Samantha Reznik is the current research postdoctoral fellow with the Advancing the Early Psychosis Intervention Network in Texas (EPINET-TX) project at the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health (TIEMH), University of Texas at Austin. She has specialized in providing recovery-oriented services to individuals diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI) and other underserved populations. She completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Arizona. She trained in Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis (CBT-P) at the Early Psychosis Intervention Center (EPICenter) in Tucson, Arizona. She completed an advanced clinical fellowship in rehabilitation and recovery for SMI at VA San Diego Healthcare System/University of California San Diego (VASDHS/UCSD), where she expanded her training in CBT-P and learned how to integrate Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy (CT-R). She also completed a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-funded clinical internship at University of Kansas Medical Center to specialize in working with underserved populations.     Positionality statement:   I have been passionate about CBT-P since I saw how it can be used to effectively partner with young people in service of recovery. One important area of non-expertise in my use of CBT-P is that I do not have lived experience of psychosis or participating in CBT-P. Having a positionality as only provider rather than receiver of services, I am mindful that lived experiences may or may not align with the evidence base of CBT-P. I work to honor each individual’s lived experience of participating in CBT-P by sharing and collaboratively building any case conceptualizations and partnering in setting goals and techniques. I apply CBT-P flexibly and use CBT-P case conceptualization to guide therapy, which often incorporates strategies from other modalities.
Meeting
The Region 6 Peer Support Advisory Committee (PSAC) to the South Southwest MHTTC meets on a monthly basis to collaborate across the states and tribal communities to identify and address common areas of need and share resources. Based on feedback from the PSAC, and needs identified by peers across Region 6, the MHTTC organizes training and technical assistance focused on peer retention and workforce development. This is a closed meeting.
Webinar/Virtual Training
ABOUT THIS EVENT The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with the Mountain West AIDS Education & Training Center Program (AETC) on this webinar series related to sexual health.  Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show a 74% increase in syphilis diagnoses from 2017-2021, including 2,800 congenital, or mother-to-child, syphilis cases in 2021 leading to 220 infant deaths. STIs overall have increased by 7% from 2020, with more than 2.5 million cases reported in the United States during 2021. Substance use, particularly methamphetamine use, appears to be highly correlated with rising rates of syphilis and other STIs. Among pregnant women with syphilis, substance use is nearly twice as high among those with a congenital syphilis outcome than those without transmission. Disparities also exist in syphilis rates across racial and ethnic groups. For example, among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) persons, the rate of new syphilis cases of nearly four times the rate of white persons in 2020. Syphilis is also increasing among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. Actions can be taken to reverse these trends and prevent transmission of syphilis and other STIs in these and other populations. Addressing the syphilis syndemic requires collaboration between mental health and substance use disorder treatment providers, sexual health service providers, and supportive services providers (e.g., housing). Our final session will provide an update on syndemic conditions that disproportionately impact people living with serious mental illnesses and/ or substance use disorders and discuss the important role of behavioral health providers in screening and linkage to treatment. Part 4 of the Sexual Health Series (click to view all sessions in this series). FACILITATORS Tim Menza, MD, PhD Tim Menza, MD, PhD (he/they), is an infectious disease specialist with advanced training and expertise in HIV, STI, and viral hepatitis prevention and care. Tim has extensive experience in creating, implementing, and evaluating public health policy and advocating for communities through system-level change. As medical director of Oregon’s HIV/STD/TB program over the past 5 and a half years, Tim facilitated the implementation of a free statewide home HIV/STI testing program, public health accountability metrics for the prevention of congenital syphilis, partnerships with correctional facilities to increase HIV/STI/HCV testing and led Oregon’s response to mpox. Tim is currently an associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Washington and a medical director of the Sexual Health Clinic with Public Health-Seattle & King County. Lydia Chwastiak, MD, MPH Dr. Chwastiak is a psychiatrist, internist and health services researcher who is a Professor in the UW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  Over the past 22 years, her research has focused on improving care and outcomes for people with complex needs in low resource settings, such as low-barrier primary care clinics and community mental health centers in the US, and primary and secondary medical settings in India and Nepal. Dr. Chwastiak is co-directs the UW Behavioral Research in HIV (BIRCH) Center, an NIMH-funded AIDS Research Center, and is the PI and co-director of the Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (NW MHTTC).  
Webinar/Virtual TrainingOther
Calling all practicing Youth Peers across the country from diverse locations and organizations! We want to hear from you about a crucial tool for youth peer support specialists: the self-assessment tool. Join us in this important conversation and contribute to the growth and effectiveness of youth peer support practice. You will be provided a stipend for participation.   Facilitator: Rowan Willis-Powell (she/they) is an experienced systems transformation advocate with 10 years of experience using their living expertise to uplift the voices of youth peers, guide development of youth peer programs, educate the behavioral health community about supporting LGBTQIA individuals, and advocate for appropriate and equitable suicide prevention and intervention for youth. Rowan has 10 years of experience connecting and mentoring young adults with lived experience in behavioral health service settings to peer support career pathways and leadership opportunities on community, state, and national levels. Rowan has supported numerous organizations and groups with the process of developing or strengthening their youth serving programs and always strives to ensure that youth voice and youth engagement are at the focus of the work.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description In this engaging and empowering training session, participants will explore effective strategies to build personal resilience and navigate workplace challenges constructively. This session will help attendees recognize and address bullying behaviors while learning strength-based approaches to foster a supportive and positive work environment. Through practical examples, participants will gain insights into promoting inclusivity and respect.  Even if transforming the workplace may not be practical, this training will equip you with the skills and strategies to protect and strengthen yourself in a challenging environment. Join us to enhance your personal resilience, develop constructive responses to bullying, and create a positive impact within your sphere of influence.    Objectives  Build Personal Resilience  Recognize and Address Bullying Behaviors  Promote Inclusivity and Respect as Seen through Effective Leadership Styles  Trainer LaVonne Fox Peltier Dr. LaVonne Fox Peltier serves as a Research Assistant Professor within the Bureau of Evaluation & Research Service, situated in the Department of Education, Health, and Behavioral Studies at the University of North Dakota. A member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa reservation, she remains deeply connected to her roots. Drawing from her extensive background, she has dedicated her expertise to working with children, youth, and young adults facing mental health challenges both in rural and urban areas as well as within mental health facilities.  Dr. Fox Peltier is particularly passionate about developing culturally rooted interventions inspired by Indigenous practices to address mental health issues. In her work, she emphasizes the importance of adopting strength-based approaches, advocating for alternatives to the commonly employed deficit-based practices. She is committed to bridging cultural understanding and mental health care for Indigenous peoples. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest MHTTC is excited to partner with Kira Mauseth and Salsabiel Alzubaidi to offer a live learning community on culturally informed crisis support as a mental health practitioner. 6 hours of CE contact hours available* (see below.) ABOUT THIS LEARNING COMMUNITY This learning community will provide participants with a framework for developing their cultural awareness and competencies when supporting people in crisis. Often, when providing behavioral health support to an individual or family, we may find ourselves outside of our personal expertise or experience when it comes to the cultural background of the person we are supporting. This learning community will cover important cross-cultural nuances for support, including contextual communication, biases and assumptions, and lenses for expression of distress and appropriate interventions that can vary dramatically amongst and between groups. The framework provided in this session equips health providers with essential tools to understand their own social location, navigate power dynamics, and enhance cultural awareness.  Key tools include:  - Creating a personal cultural understanding map  - Utilizing a multicultural communication skills reflective tool  - Challenging biases with the "Surfacing Assumptions" tool  - Leveraging resources and promoting inclusive organizational practices with advocacy tools  - Developing an inclusive crisis plan for diverse demographics  ELIGIBILITY Members of the mental health/behavioral health workforce who are based in the states of Alaska, Oregon, Idaho & Washington (HHS Region 10) Commitment to attend the whole series is required Each individual must have access to computer/web camera/audio to participate The deadline for applications is July 1st. We will notify you of your application status by Monday, July 8th, 2024. Questions: For questions about this series, including eligibility and registration please contact the Northwest MHTTC at [email protected]. SESSIONS: Wednesday, July 17 & 24, August 14 & 21, 2024 12:00 - 1:30 pm AK / 1:00 - 2:30pm PT / 2:00 - 3:30pm MT Session 1, July 17th:  This session will start with recognition and awareness of what we each "bring with us" as we engage in supporting others on a dynamic cultural landscape. The focus of this first session will be to go in depth on tools to increase self-awareness of cross-cultural knowledge gaps and biases. Session 2, July 24th: This session will build off the previous one and help participants with recognizing and effectively addressing the power dynamics in a supportive relationship. Session 3, August 14th: This session takes our work further and discusses in detail how we acknowledge and use cultural awareness and understanding to engage effectively in crisis support and emergency response work. Session 4, August 21st: This session wraps up our learning community by discussing ways to represent best practices and advocate for inclusive policies and practices within your organization. FACILITATORS Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates in Everett and Edmonds, WA, is a Teaching Professor at Seattle University and formerly served as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health throughout the COVID response. She also owns Astrum Health LLC and consults with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities. Dr. Mauseth has provided training to community groups and professionals both regionally and abroad as the co-developer of the Health Support Team© program. Her work and research focus on disaster behavioral health, resilience, and recovery from trauma as well as small and large-scale critical incident response and preparation for organizations. She has worked abroad extensively with disaster survivors and refugees in Haiti, Jordan and Poland, and has trained first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States, and currently serves in the adult mental health clinical seat on Washington State's Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC). Salsabiel Alzubaidi, MA Salsabiel Alzubaidi is an Organizational Transformation, Leadership, and Legacy Consultant driven by her belief in justice and her appreciation for the rich tapestry of human diversity. With a lifelong passion for innovation in diversity and inclusion across social, educational, and professional realms, Salsi has honed her expertise in guiding organizations through transformative journeys. Her impactful contributions have left a legacy of progress at organizations such as Shift Energy Group, For9a.com, Seattle University, and Questscope, as well as governmental and numerous international social development platforms. Throughout her career, Salsi has distinguished herself as a dynamic HR and educational programming professional, specializing in programs that promote diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Her ability to unite diverse populations and maximize program effectiveness underscores her commitment to driving positive change. *Continuing Education Contact Hours Details Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUs with your licensing/credentialing entity. The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, substance use disorder professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620, WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic. The topic for webinar session 5 is "Person-Centered Advance Crisis Planning to Maximize Choice & Control." At the end of the series, participants will be able to: Define PCRP and its essential elements Increase familiarity with existing and emerging state and federal requirements regarding PCRP Articulate a minimum of three differences between traditional methods of treatment planning and best-practice PCRP Learn more about how the MHTTC PCRP Consultation Corner series can provide tools and resources to support the implementation of PCRP at your organization   While the Consultation Corner’s webinar series is open to a national audience, priority for technical assistance office hours following this webinar session on July 17 will be given to webinar participants from the New England (Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Rhode Island, New Hampshire) and South Southwest (Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas) regions.   Presenters: Janis Tondora and Amy Pierce Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs. More information about the series.   Continuing Education Units for this event are offered by the Office of Professional Development, Steve Hicks School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin: · Social Work · Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) · Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)   Continuing Education Units for this event are offered by the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health/South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, The University of Texas at Austin as recognized by the Texas Certification Board: · Mental Health Peer Specialist (MHPS) · Recovery Support Peer Specialist (RSPS) · Re-Entry Peer Specialist (JI-RPS) · Peer Specialist Supervisor (PSS) · Certified Family Partner (CFP)   These entities are recognized as providers of continuing education credits, however, attendees are responsible for checking with their licensing or credentialing board to ensure acceptance of the CEUs issued. If you have questions about CEUs for a credential that you do not see listed here, contact [email protected].     If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
This is Session 3 of 4 in the Applying Holistic Leadership to Create Healthier Workplace Cultures series. Event Description This program aims to equip behavioral health leaders with the essential skills and knowledge to effectively lead teams and foster healthier organizational cultures. Participants will learn strategic and people-focused leadership methods through “Authentic Connection.” The goal of this training series is to enhance their ability to navigate uncertainty, ambiguity, and conflict while maintaining resilience and composure in a rapidly changing behavioral health landscape.  Participants will learn:   -          Explore strategies for fostering wellness and resilience to develop a healthier work culture within their scope of influence.  -          Acquire practical skills in self-care, compassion, and inclusive strategies to integrate into their professional roles.  -          Learn communication strategies to collaborate with others to develop adaptive strategies to address challenges in diverse teams.    Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk).   He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University.   His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more.   His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION This webinar will review some of the historical and cultural factors that are associated with stigma among Blacks about mental illnesses and treatment. Health care disparities in this population will be discussed along with how to ensure that assessments are culturally relevant and appropriate. Examples of best practices for reducing stigma and increasing engagement of Black communities will be explored. The Central East MHTTC is hosting this webinar in recognition of July as National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, which is also known as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) Mental Health Month. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe historical and cultural factors that contribute to stigma about mental health disorders and treatment among members of the African American Community Enumerate some of the differences between traditional African values and traditional Western values Be able to assess diagnostic tools and clinical interventions for their appropriateness for use in African American populations PRESENTERS Curley L. Bonds, MD is the Chief Medical Officer for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. He has held clinical leadership positions at Charles R. Drew University (CDU) and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He holds faculty appointments as Health Sciences Clinical Professor at UCLA and Professor at CDU. Dr. Bonds earned his BA in Sociology from Emory University and his MD from Indiana University. He completed residency training at UCLA’s Semel Institute. Dr. Bonds is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and a Fellow of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. He is a past president of the Southern California Psychiatric Society (SCPS). HOST Annelle Primm MD, MPH is the Senior Medical Director of the Steve Fund, an organization focused on the mental health of young people of color. She is also a member of the Black Psychiatrists of America Council of Elders. This webinar is part of the Health Equity Webinar Series, an ongoing collaboration between the Central East MHTTC and the Black Psychiatrists of America to increase education and awareness surrounding mental health in the Black community. View past webinars in the series
Webinar/Virtual Training
A series of monthly calls for ACT psychiatric care providers. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Best Practices at the University of North Carolina. ABOUT THIS EVENT Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a multidisciplinary, team-based model that provides intensive community-based and outreach-oriented services to people who experience the most severe and persistent mental illness. The vast majority also have a co-occurring substance use disorder and many experience comorbid medical illnesses. The Northwest MHTTC is hosting a series for ACT psychiatric care providers. We welcome all ACT psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and other prescribers. Sessions will be held once a month on Thursdays at 12:00-1:30 pm Pacific/3:00-4:30 pm Eastern, May-July 2024. Learn more about the series and upcoming sessions here. This presentation will identify cardiovascular risk factors for individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and describe potential areas of prevention and intervention, with an emphasis on practical tips for ACT Providers. Learning Objectives Name factors that contribute to increased rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons with SMI. Apply principles of motivational interviewing to promote behaviors that impact cardiovascular health. Diagnose obesity, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Increase familiarity and comfort with prescribing medication for cardiovascular risk-associated conditions. FACILITATOR   Martha Ward, MD Dr. Martha Ward is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Ward’s clinical work is focused on improving medical and psychiatric outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness through integrated care. Dr. Ward is the Medical Director of Park Place Primary Care, a collaborative primary care clinic located in the Behavioral Health Outpatient center at Grady Memorial Hospital. In this clinic, she serves the complex medical and psychiatric needs of patients that previously had no continuity of medical care and provides a unique training opportunity for students and residents. Additionally, Dr. Ward is passionate about medical education. She serves as Small Group Advisor and Society Mentor for medical students at Emory SOM and acts as Associate Program Director for the Combined Internal-Medicine Psychiatry Residency at Emory and Co-Director of the Global and Population Mental Health Track for the categorical Psychiatry Residency.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest MHTTC is excited to partner with Martin “Marty” Reinsel to offer a live learning community on trauma-informed de-escalation. 6 hours of CE contact hours available* (see below.) ABOUT THIS LEARNING COMMUNITY This highly interactive learning community will focus on providing participants with a framework for developing their personal awareness during instances of de-escalation, while utilizing principles of trauma-informed care to increase competencies during and after a crisis. Participants will learn the “Spectrum of Escalation" and elements of personal preparedness, while focusing on prevention and early intervention and post-intervention practices. Through these methods, participants will enhance confidence in managing complex behavioral situations. ELIGIBILITY Members of the mental health/behavioral health workforce who are based in the states of Alaska, Oregon, Idaho & Washington (HHS Region 10) Commitment to attend the whole series is required Each individual must have access to computer/web camera/audio to participate The deadline for applications is July 10. We will notify you of your application status the week of July 15th. Questions: For questions about this series, including eligibility and registration please contact the Northwest MHTTC at [email protected]. SESSIONS: Mondays, July 22 & 29, August 12 & 19, 2024 11:30am - 1:00pm AK / 12:30 - 2:00pm PT / 1:30 - 3:00pm MT Session breakdown TBA! FACILITATOR Martin Reinsel, LMHC (he/him) Martin “Marty” Reinsel is a Seattle-based therapist, clinical supervisor, educator, and consultant with over 30-years of experience working in a variety of behavioral healthcare settings. Marty has consistently worked in unique and challenging environments and is competent in addressing complex, and often uncomfortable, issues and situations, while leading with care, compassion, and a growth-mindset. He spent the first 20 years of his career at Seattle based Harborview Medical Center and Navos Mental Health Solutions, where he gained extensive experience in Crisis Intervention, before starting his own business, Reinsel Consulting in 2018. Marty’s training and consultation work has transcended many organizations, including those in the trades and transportation industry. He is currently working with internationally acclaimed musicians, local librarians, executives, food bank organizers, law enforcement officers, and Health Care for the Homeless clinicians. Marty believes we all benefit from kindness, care, mentorship and supportive practices. He appreciates having the opportunity to be real and genuine, and to equally laugh and cry with amazing people who have impact upon our communities. In addition to Marty’s clinical work, he is an accomplished recording and touring musician who loves to travel and spend quality time with his family and close friends. *Continuing Education Contact Hours Details Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUs with your licensing/credentialing entity. The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, substance use disorder professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620, WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 90-minute webinar will discuss how professionals and leaders can use storytelling methods to achieve effective communication. ABOUT THIS EVENT This 90-minute webinar will equip behavioral health professionals with the skills and knowledge to leverage storytelling for effective communication and community engagement. Through a combination of theoretical understanding, practical exercises, and real-world application, participants will emerge with enhanced storytelling capabilities that can drive positive change in behavioral health. The goal is to enhance communication to build more functional relationships and improve service outcomes. Improve participants' ability to craft compelling stories that resonate with diverse audiences in the context of behavioral health. Equip participants with the ability to integrate local stories into their behavioral health messages for increased community engagement. Develop participants' ability to assess the impact of storytelling on behavioral health outcomes through measurable indicators. Offered in collaboration with Lewis Family Consulting. FACILITATOR Lamarr Lewis, MA, LAPC, CPRP Lamarr Lewis is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert and trainer for such organizations as; Boeing, Fulton County Probate Court, Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Region IV Public Health Training Center, the Ruby Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, and more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
Join Us to Learn Realistic, Achievable Habits that Strengthen Our Mind and Improve Wellbeing SMART offers an innovative, modern, uplifting, and highly scalable approach to enhance individual resilience. Developed by Dr. Amit Sood at the Mayo Clinic, SMART is offered as a four-module structured program. SMART has been tested and found efficacious in over 30 clinical trials for decreasing symptoms of stress, anxiety, and burnout, and increasing resilience, wellbeing, mindfulness, happiness, and positive health behaviors. CEUs are available!
Webinar/Virtual Training
What do we know (exploring data-informed discussions and decisions)? This learning session is the first of two in the series Healing School Communities in the Context of Faith-Based Bullying, intended for students, families, educators, and school mental health professionals who are navigating the ongoing impact of faith-based bullying on student and staff mental health. Each 1.5 hour learning session features a moderator who will engage advocates, leaders and the school mental health workforce in a conversation that focuses on: Navigating discussions which are grounded in advancing belonging and preventing/intervening in faith-based bullying both in and out of school; Elevating strategies for communicating and engaging in the ongoing work to support the mental health of students and school mental health professionals which are grounded in community wisdom and build upon protective factors, both in and out of school; Developing spaces which engender opportunities for the field to improve its commitment to fostering a workforce ready, able and willing to hold faith-based bullying as a mental health issue in a way that is founded in community strengths and wisdom while supporting and building protective factors. Introducing a set of tools to navigate this moment while minimizing more harm. Priming resources: We have curated a list of MHTTC and external resources that detail strategies to address Islamophobia and antisemitism, the effects of Islamophobia and antisemitism on students and schools, and ways to support affected students and staff. Access our priming resources here!
Webinar/Virtual Training
United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend "Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance: Wise Practices," a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length and will provide an opportunity for participants to:   Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens July's session will be a discussion on "International Indigenous Behavioral Health." The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music video and Native spoken word performances as part of each session. Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. Continuing education credits will be provided.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
Part 1 of 2 in the "Fostering Trust & Employee Wellbeing through Reflective & Relational-Based Supervision" Series (view series page for full details)     Interested in how to provide supervision through a trauma-informed lens? Hoping to interrupt team burnout and support your workforce retention? By nurturing our supervision skills and approaches through a practice known as Reflective Supervision/Consultation (RSC), we can embody the parallel process in which we as colleagues experience the same kind of relational dynamics we hope to encourage in our provider-client relationships.   Both sessions in this two-part series provide building blocks for foundational, conceptual, and applied information related to reflective facilitation/supervision, in both preventive and treatment settings for mental health professionals.    Traditionally, RSC is mainly fostered in early childhood/ infant mental health settings;  However, we offer these two workshops not only for Early Childhood & Education practitioners to strengthen their RSC skills, but for anyone (school mental health supervisors/professionals and other mental health supervisors/professionals beyond the school context) to explore how RSC can fortify our supervisor-supervisee relationships and overall team wellbeing.    More information about reflective supervision, including the evidence behind its impact, and how it actuates trauma-informed organizational culture is linked here: What is Reflective Supervision | Multiplying Connections.     In Part 1, Rouba Otaky, LMFT, will walk participants through the nuts and bolts of reflective supervision and consultation.   Learning Objectives Identify three key components of reflective supervision and apply appropriate skills within their different roles and responsibilities as supervisors. Name at least four techniques that will address the needs of supervisees to be responsive to cultural and contextual needs and continue to develop a set of skills that helps supervisees build these skills. State three ways that supervisors will strengthen and support skills that allow supervisees to explore ways that their own belief systems or internal reactions might be impacting care. Audience Supervisors, managers, directors, administrators and leadership of early childhood/infant mental health, k-12 school mental health, and mental health organizations, and agencies Clinical supervisors, human resources professionals, mental health and school mental health providers (e.g., infant mental health specialists, therapists, social workers, peer support professionals) Trauma informed professionals Anyone else interested in reflective supervision and consultation!    Faculty  Otaky, LMFT, holds a Master’s degree in Marriage, Couples Child Counseling & College Counseling, a BS in Psychology & Spanish, is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a certified Reflective Practice Mentor, and Infant Mental Health Specialist. She has over 15 years of experience working in program management, community collaboration, supervision, and therapy with specialization in anti-racism, diversity, equity and inclusion, and child-parent psychotherapy.  She has provided reflective practice training, consultation, and supervision for over 10 years and is committed to supporting providers in building reflective practices in their work and lives. Priming Resources  Honoring Race and Diversity in Reflective Supervision: Guiding Principles to Enhance Relationships | ZERO TO THREE  Using Reflective Supervision to Support Trauma-Informed Systems for Children  THE REFLECTIVE SUPERVISION TOOLKIT Reflective Supervision Collaborative - Southwest Human Development     
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION SAMHSA's Region 3 Central East Mental Health Technology Transfer Center partnered with Advocates for Human Potential, Inc. (AHP) to develop Black and Latinx Perinatal PTSD: What Behavioral Health Providers Need to Know. This four-session virtual training series aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of perinatal post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), specifically in the context of Black and Latinx mothers. Session 4 will center on how these mothers are doubly stigmatized by their race and their substance use disorder/opioid use disorder (SUD/OUD). Throughout the series, participants will gain knowledge and skills to support and provide culturally sensitive care to Black and Latinx mothers experiencing perinatal PTSD. Trainings will build on one another but can also stand alone, so participants can attend some or all of the trainings. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Examine the stigmatization of SUDs, particularly in the context of Black and Latinx communities. Understand the unique challenges faced by Black and Latinx mothers with SUD/OUD during the perinatal period. Develop strategies to reduce stigma and provide nonjudgmental care for Black and Latinx mothers with SUD/OUD. PRESENTERS Tiffany Malone, M.A., is a seasoned senior program manager at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP), bringing two decades of experience to her role. She spearheads the Mentored Internship Program under the California Department of Health Care Services’ Behavioral Health Workforce Development Initiative. As the Deputy Director, Tiffany provides strategic planning, oversight, management, and invaluable training and technical assistance (TA) to behavioral health organizations across California, aiding in the expansion of the state’s behavioral health workforce. With expertise in various training formats and extensive management experience, Ms. Malone is adept at driving performance and fostering growth within her teams. Prior to her time at AHP, she provided behavioral support to families, specifically mothers with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. She is deeply committed to advocating for Black maternal and infant health. Her dedication extends to her involvement with the African American Infant and Maternal Mortality Village Fund, where she champions holistic wellness services for Black and Latinx mothers. She actively addresses systemic issues contributing to maternal mortality rates among Black and Latinx women in Los Angeles County. Ms. Malone holds a B.S. in health management from Howard University and an M.A. in teaching applied behavior analysis from National University. Additionally, she is certified as a Master Life Coach, Cognitive Behavior Life Coach, and 200-hour yoga instructor.   Linzi A. Jack, M.A., NBC-HWC, is a senior program associate with AHP and a Board-Certified Integrative Health and Wellness Coach with more than 12 years of experience in the policy and organizational landscapes of behavioral health, homelessness, and substance use. She has a keen focus on advancing health equity by reducing the socioeconomic barriers that drive poor health outcomes for underserved communities. Ms. Jack provides dynamic thought leadership, logistical support, TA content development, and grantee support to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Behavioral Health Technical Assistance Program and the Illinois Regional Care Coordination Agency Projects at AHP. She has an extensive background in implementing large-scale quality improvement programs for Federally Qualified Health Centers, including the National Committee for Quality Assurance Patient-Centered Medical Home Certification and the Centers for Disease. Control and Prevention Immunization Quality Improvement for Providers program. Ms. Jack holds a B.S. in psychology from Howard University and an M.A. in integrative health and wellness coaching from the Maryland University of Integrative Health.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Eating disorders, and essential knowledge for clinicians, are the focus of this 90-minute webinar. ABOUT THIS EVENT Eating disorders are common mental health disorders that can negatively affect quality of life and can be fatal. It is important for clinicians to be able to recognize individuals with disordered eating and help them get the treatment they need. In this presentation, we will review what eating disorders are, who and how to screen, initial interventions, when to consider referring an individual for additional support, and how to help caregivers who may be supporting someone with an eating disorder. Objectives: - Identify who is at risk for eating disorders - Describe how to screen for eating disorders - Discuss interventions for eating disorders and when to refer for specialized treatment - Discuss how to support caregivers to help someone who has an eating disorder, especially if they need treatment. FACILITATORS Megan Riddle, MS, MD, PhD Megan Riddle, MS MD PhD (she/her), is board-certified in both adult psychiatry and consult liaison psychiatry. She attended Western Washington University for her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then went to Weill Cornell Medical College where she earned a medical degree as well as a PhD in neuroscience. She completed her residency and fellowship training in psychiatry at the University of Washington.  She is currently a Courtesy Clinical Instructor with the University of Washington Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and enjoys teaching and supervising residents.  After graduating, Dr. Riddle started working at the Eating Recovery Center in Bellevue, WA, where she is currently medical director.  Dr. Riddle has a longstanding passion for eating disorders, with a particular interest in inclusivity in eating disorder treatment and research, with a focus on transgender and gender diverse individuals.   Natalie Goodwin, PhD Natalie Goodwin, PhD (she/her), is a native Seattle-ite who loves living in the Pacific Northwest and taking advantage of all the natural beauty it has to offer. She left Seattle for a short period of time to journey to the south for graduate training. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Alabama, Birmingham and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Following the completion of her graduate training, Dr. Goodwin returned home to Seattle and served as a clinical manager and clinical director at Eating Recovery Center Bellevue for 6 years and then spent 3 years in private practice. Her professional focus is in the area of treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Goodwin enjoys providing therapeutic intervention with clients and their families, as well as supporting others who are providing care through teaching, supervision and general support. Therapeutically her favorite interventions are Family Based Treatment, Emotion Focused Family Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She is certified in Exposure and Response Prevention treatment for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and also has training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, and Prolonged Exposure for PTSD.  In her personal life, Dr. Goodwin enjoys hanging out with her partner and cats, and spending time being an extroverted introvert who loves yoga, dancing, rollerblading, reading, the sunshine, nature, food and her friends.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
How might we grow (in our practice and policies)? This learning session is the second of two in the series Healing School Communities in the Context of Faith-Based Bullying, intended for students, families, educators, and school mental health professionals who are navigating the ongoing impact of faith-based bullying on student and staff mental health. Each 1.5 hour learning session features a moderator who will engage advocates, leaders and the school mental health workforce in a conversation that focuses on: Navigating discussions which are grounded in advancing belonging and preventing/intervening in faith-based bullying both in and out of school; Elevating strategies for communicating and engaging in the ongoing work to support the mental health of students and school mental health professionals which are grounded in community wisdom and build upon protective factors, both in and out of school; Developing spaces which engender opportunities for the field to improve its commitment to fostering a workforce ready, able and willing to hold faith-based bullying as a mental health issue in a way that is founded in community strengths and wisdom while supporting and building protective factors. Introducing a set of tools to navigate this moment while minimizing more harm. Priming resources: We have curated a list of MHTTC and external resources that detail strategies to address Islamophobia and antisemitism, the effects of Islamophobia and antisemitism on students and schools, and ways to support affected students and staff. Access our priming resources here!
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description This is Session 1 of the Thriving Together series. Learning objectives for this session include: Define the components of a Culture of Care within an organization and its impact on staff retention and morale.  Identify effective communication strategies for promoting a Culture of Care and fostering collaboration among staff members.  Analyze strategies for fostering Organizational Commitment to a Culture of Care, including leadership involvement and staff engagement initiatives.  Trainers Rachel Navarro, PhD, LP  Topaza Yu 
Webinar/Virtual Training
This training is part two of the Better Visits: Creating an Affirming Environment for LGBTQ+ Clients series. Everyone is welcome to attend this session, even if you did not attend the first session. In this training, we will continue to explore how community behavioral health agencies can better serve the LGBTQ+ community. In this webinar, participants will gain practical strategies for address gender identity and sexual orientation. Starting at intake, participants will lean ways to improve interactions and ask clarifying questions to improve the intake process.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will recognize their own discomfort to better address it within the helping relationship. Participants will learn at least three strategies to improve interactions with the LGBTQ+ community. Participants will learn at least two ways to ask better questions.   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTER: Samuell Carney, MSW, LSW Sam is from Houston, Texas. He graduated from the University of Houston with his Master’s in Social Work in 2016 and gained his LSW in 2017. He is currently a full-time therapist in private practice. Sam began his transition from female to male in 2018 and has spoken about his experiences personally as well as professionally within the community.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Many meetings feel like a waste of time, clog up our day and make our real work hard to get to. In addition, many meetings are unnecessary and can be replaced by other more effective team practices. This short course shares seven practical tips to make your next meeting productive and useful.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Discern whether a meeting is required or not Describe strategies to make meetings quick and effective   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 1 continuing education (CE) hour certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER: Russ Turner, MA, Director of the People Incorporated Training InstituteDuring Russ’s 16-year tenure, he has written and taught thousands of hours of person-centered curriculum to help people become more effective helpers, communicators, and leaders. His audience includes workers and leaders across a wide range of organizations from human services, healthcare, and libraries, to law enforcement and corrections. He trains trainers, works with management, and has consulted and coached on training projects across multiple sectors of the economy. He has worked as an educator for three decades in a variety of countries and settings including Japan, the Czech Republic, and the UK. His teaching philosophy is that adults learn best when they are challenged, the material is applicable to work situations, and sessions are interactive and engaging.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
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