Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Webinar/Virtual Training
Suicide is a global public health concern, and the need for robust prevention infrastructure is more critical than ever. This learning session will delve into the multi-faceted approach the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) has taken to support states and territories in building effective and sustainable suicide prevention infrastructure. During this session we will explore the intersection of community behavioral health services and suicide prevention infrastructure through shared risk and protective factors, crisis supports, and focus on social determinants of health. Participants will learn about: SPRC’s Recommendations for State Suicide Prevention Infrastructure including the six essential elements of prevention infrastructure Evaluating suicide prevention infrastructure using the State and Territorial Suicide Prevention Needs Assessment (SNA) Current national priority areas and key findings of the 2023 SNA SPRC resources and tools to support comprehensive suicide prevention infrastructure A case study demonstrating how effective suicide prevention infrastructure tangibly reduces suicide rates During this session we will also briefly touch upon the broader significance of these elements within the wider suicide prevention landscape. This session aims to equip participants with the knowledge, tools, and inspiration to address shared gaps in effective suicide prevention and promote progress towards sustainable suicide prevention infrastructure. A certificate of attendance will be provided to participants who attend 50% or more of the session.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Reasonable accommodations and modifications for tenants with mental or behavioral health conditions is the focus of this 90-minute webinar. ABOUT THIS EVENT Housing isn't "one size fits all," and tenants with mental or behavioral health conditions might need adjustments to their housing so they, too, can have a stable, healthy home. Reasonable accommodations and modifications can help tenants make these necessary adjustments to their rental so their house can become a home. During this presentation, attorneys will review what reasonable accommodations and modifications are, how to talk to landlords about them, and provide tips on handling difficult cases. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. Additional Resources: Slides RA guide for medical professionals Washington Low Income Housing Alliance - want to get involved with WLIHA? Please email [email protected] King County Tenant Resource Line, open M-F (except holidays) from 9 AM to 1 PM: (206) 580-0762 Solid Ground classes: Webinars for tenants  FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation. Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description This online webinar offers a focused exploration into implementing Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) within settings necessitating brief, effective interventions (e.g., Integrated Behavioral Health positions). This 60-minute session, split between didactic learning and hands-on practice, is designed for clinicians seeking effective, short-term therapeutic strategies that encourage long-term patient engagement. Learn the fundamentals of FACT, its application in IBH or similar settings for addressing a wide range of issues quickly and effectively, and techniques to boost patient retention and follow-up. Ideal for mental health professionals in fast-paced settings, this webinar will equip you with the skills to make a lasting impact in brief clinical encounters.    This training is in response to questions we received from participants at our April training,  Rural Resilience:  Bridging Mental Health Support for Men in the Heartland  Trainer Andrew Jordan Thayer, PhD, LP 
Webinar/Virtual Training
The South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center is thrilled to host a free, one-hour event on Reflective Supervision. This event is specifically for those new to the concept or within three years of practice/participation. The webinar is open to early childhood mental and behavioral health providers within the HHS Region VI states including Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.  The South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center is honored to host Nat Vikitsreth, a nationally award-winning decolonized therapist and facilitator, trans rights activist, and host of the Come Back to Care Podcast, to present on the topic. This webinar is open to all curious and compassionate early childhood providers who meet the criteria listed above and are looking to understand Reflective Supervision as a means to grow, create, and connect.  The heART of Reflective Supervision: Attunement, Reflection, and Togetherness webinar will help shape experiences providing and participating in reflective practices across disciplines. Join us for an hour of education, “a-hah” moments, and strategies to elevate the work in and around Reflective Supervision.  Objectives Participants will be able to: Define Reflective Supervision and the participating roles Learn strategies for providing and receiving Reflective Supervision Describe how equity and the parallel process are involved in Reflective Supervision Facilitator Nat Vikitsreth, LCSW (she/her) works as a nationally award-winning decolonized therapist and facilitator, a trans rights activist, and host of the Come Back to Care Podcast, which you can visit here. She founded Come Back to Care to help anyone who loves and raises children to heal as they get free.   
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Event: Mental Health Awareness Month is not just about community awareness, or being aware of the people around us. For those of us living in mental health recovery, being aware of ourselves—being able to hear, see, and interpret the signals our body and mind send us—is ​an important part of maintaining our recovery. Waiting for others to observe and comment on perceived changes in us can unnecessarily extend or even increase negative impacts of mental health concerns. In this webinar,  Beth Lambert, CPS-MH, CPS-AD and Claudia Renee Hamilton, CPS-MH, CPS-AD of Rome, Georgia will discuss the benefits of having a self-care plan for daily living that is not crisis-focused, but a strengths-based approach that emphasizes nurturing wellness and strengthening resilience in manageable moments throughout the day. They will demonstrate some of the techniques they employ, including a brief, self-guided meditation that can be done anytime, anywhere. Learning Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: List the benefits of having a self-care plan; Describe behaviors, thoughts, and feelings that may serve as signals that a self-care activity is warranted; Demonstrate at least one informal self-care activity that can be used as part of a self-care plan.
Webinar/Virtual Training
WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2024 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. PT Session 4 of 4 in the "Rooting Young Adult Mental Health Services in Culturally Sustaining Values & Practices" Series (view series main page for full details)   Honoring and Supporting Peer Support in Healing-Centered Approaches May 22, 2024: Session 4   This session’s essential question is: How might organizations truly value, uplift, and support the wisdom and skill of those with lived experience? Join us as we explore peer support in healing-centered engagement. The learning objectives include: How YYA serving organizations can implement peer support providers, and uplift lived experience professionals Learn about the power and benefits of peer support in a young person's life Ways to implement peer support in young people's treatment plan as a way to promote employment opportunities and belonging How to create youth leadership programming and youth voice initiatives   Main Series Program Goals Counter the impacts of vicarious trauma and burn out by creating a safe and responsive learning community for the YYA workforce to be heard and seen in their efforts to support the holistic needs of their clientele. Build an understanding of healing centered engagement and approaches to youth development and case management that strengthens service provision for transition-aged youth. Expand our organizational and individual capacity to support young adult holistic wellness, critical consciousness development, and collective healing.     Audience All community-based organizations, institutions, and mental health professionals, including peer support specialists, therapists, psychologists, counselors, and others who support the mental health and wellness of transition-aged youth.     Meet the Co-Facilitators   Oriana Ides, MA, APCC, PPS (she/hers) Oriana Ides is a School Mental Health Training Specialist at CARS (the Center for Applied Research Solutions) and approaches healing the wounds of trauma and oppression as core elements of social justice. She has worked with young people across the life course from elementary school to college, and has served as teacher-leader, school counselor, classroom educator and program director. She is committed to generating equity within school structures and policies by focusing on evidence-based mental health techniques and institutional design.       Falilah “Aisha” Bilal (she/her) Falilah “Aisha” Bilal has worked joyously for over 30 years creating innovative, relevant evidence-based strategies to transform, empower and develop individuals, systems, organizations and contemporary thought. Ms. Bilal’s work is centered in healing practices, empowering youth and families, and self-discovery.  Ms. Bilal specializes in the field of youth development, healing informed organizational development, and strategic fundraising consultation. Currently Ms. Bilal serves as the Chief of Staff for the Black Organizing Project as well as directs her own consulting company where she provides trainings, curriculum development, healing experiences, coaching, and executive leadership to local and national agencies, companies and programs. Previously, Ms. Bilal served as a Senior Trainer with the National Black Women’s Justice Institute and a Radical Healer with Flourish Agenda.  She served as the Executive Director for M.I.S.S.S.E.Y. raising over 2 million dollars in funds to support sexually exploited children and young adults.   She has worked for numerous Bay Area agencies including World Trust, Alameda County Sheriff’s Department, Oakland Bay Area CARES Mentoring Movement, GirlSource, Office of Family, Children and Youth, City of Oakland, and the Young Women’s Freedom Center. Ms. Bilal holds a M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies and a B.A. in Theater Arts and Child Psychology from San Francisco State University.   Meet the Panel Speakers   Nola Brantley (she/her) Nola Brantley, the Founder & CEO of Nola Brantley Speaks, stands as a beacon in the fight against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) in California since 2004. Her journey, intertwined with the struggles of sex trafficking victims, fuels her unwavering advocacy for historically oppressed and marginalized children. Nola's deep-rooted understanding of trauma, shaped by her own experiences of poverty, abuse, foster care, and authority misuse, positions her as a powerful voice in the national discourse on child sex trafficking. Through compelling public speaking engagements, Nola has earned acclaim for her steadfast commitment to combatting child sex trafficking. Her personal narrative illuminates the intricate web of challenges faced by CSEC victims, shedding light on the systemic issues that perpetuate their vulnerability in society. Nola's advocacy serves as a catalyst for change, amplifying the voices of youth who have long been silenced and overlooked. As a revered subject matter expert in the realm of child sex trafficking, Nola channels her expertise as a master-trainer at Nola Brantley Speaks, impacting over 350,000 professionals and community members worldwide. Her groundbreaking aftercare methods for survivors of abuse offer a path to healing and restoration, instilling hope in those grappling with trauma. Nola's tireless dedication to raising awareness and providing holistic support for victims of CSEC embodies a commitment to fostering resilience and empowerment in the face of adversity. Her work continues to drive meaningful progress in the fight against child sex trafficking, advocating for a future where all children are safeguarded and valued.   Xochtil Larios (she/her) Xochtil Larios is the Youth Justice Coordinator at Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ), where she cut her teeth in community organizing, youth leadership, and activism as a program participant while incarcerated in juvenile hall. At CURYJ, Xochtil brought her innovative Youth Transformation Curriculum to detained youth and led participatory research, culminating in the 2019 report “Dream Beyond Bars: A Youth Vision for Alameda County’s Juvenile Justice System.” Xochtil received her Associate in Social Science from Laney College, where she was honored as a Chicana graduate of Restoring Our Communities and Raíces student networks. She is a 2018 recipient of the California Endowment Community Champion Youth Award. She also serves as a Youth Commissioner on the Alameda County Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Commission, ensuring youth voices are heard in policymaking. Xochtil works in the trenches of grassroots mobilizing and relentlessly advocates for youth representation.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare providers found themselves abruptly thrust into the world of telehealth services delivery. As agencies, clinicians, and clients increased the use of these new technologies and methods of clinical practice and collaboration, an apparent need for ethical best practices within this modality arose. This presentation will emphasize ethical best practices using technology and telehealth, ethical responses to unique challenges faced by clients and providers using this modality, and ethical concerns unique to using virtual methods in clinical practice.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this educational activity, learners will be able to: Identify ethical concerns specific to virtual service delivery in their clinical practice. Identify ethical responses to challenges associated with the use of virtual technologies. Identify and mitigate limitations in the use of technology and virtual platforms in their work.   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.     PRESENTER:  Dr. Jill D. Stinson is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She received her dual doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Psychology, Policy, and Law from the University of Arizona prior to serving as the Director of Sex Offender Treatment at Fulton State Hospital with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Her teaching focuses on professional ethics, forensic psychology, and psychological assessment, while her research focuses on serious mental illness, personality disorders, self-regulatory problems, and histories of early childhood maltreatment in persons who have committed violent and sexual offenses, as well as issues related to community re-entry, stigma, and suicidality in justice-involved populations. Dr. Stinson has authored three books related to etiology and treatment of sexual offending and motivation to engage in therapy. She is the incoming Editor-in-Chief for Sexual Abuse, Chair of the ETSU Campus IRB, and Secretary of the Board of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
A series of monthly calls for ACT psychiatric care providers. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Best Practices at the University of North Carolina. ABOUT THIS EVENT Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a multidisciplinary, team-based model that provides intensive community-based and outreach-oriented services to people who experience the most severe and persistent mental illness. The vast majority also have a co-occurring substance use disorder and many experience comorbid medical illnesses. The Northwest MHTTC is hosting a series for ACT psychiatric care providers. We welcome all ACT psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and other prescribers. Sessions will be held once a month on Thursdays at 12:00-1:30 pm Pacific/3:00-4:30 pm Eastern. Learn more about the series and upcoming sessions here. This presentation will define an ACT Psychiatrist, discuss ACT Team and Psychiatrist expectations, and share how to best advocate for the client while working within a multidisciplinary team setting. Learning Objectives At the end of the presentation participants should be able to do the following: Describe ways in which ACT psychiatry differs from other psychiatric practices and is a unique version of community psychiatry Identify skill sets important for ACT Psychiatrists Understand personal characteristics which serve ACT Psychiatrists well and make the work fulfilling FACILITATORS   Steve Harker, MD Dr. Steve Harker has been committed to the ACT model for almost 20 years in a variety of roles. Dr. Harker is an ACT psychiatrist based in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is a certified ACT Fidelity Reviewer and frequently conducts case consultations to PACT teams in Washington state. He also advises students in Hennepin-Regions' psychiatry residency program and conducts training in Hennepin-Regions' Training Institute.   Ann Hackman, MD Dr. Ann Hackman is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  She completed her psychiatry residency training at the University of Maryland in 1994.  She is a board certified psychiatrist with added qualifications in forensics and addictions.  She is the Division Director for Community Psychiatry, Medical Director for the University of Maryland’s Programs of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT), Senior Education Consultant and Senior Psychiatrist for the Recovery After Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) program.  She has longstanding interest in serious mental illness, in the treatment of people living with schizophrenia and in underserved populations including people experiencing homelessness.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Restorative practices in schools focus on building and maintaining positive relationships, addressing conflicts, and repairing harm. It involves proactive approaches like circles and community-building activities, as well as reactive processes like restorative conferences to resolve conflicts and restore relationships. By prioritizing empathy, accountability, and communication, restorative practices foster a supportive and inclusive school culture, reducing disciplinary issues and promoting social-emotional development among students. This presentation will provide an introduction to and review of restorative practices and will address readiness for implementation at the school level.
Webinar/Virtual Training
TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2024 10:00 - 11:15 a.m. HT / 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. PT / 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. MT / 2:00 - 3:15 p.m. CT / 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. ET Session 5 of 8 in the "Provider Plática Learning Collaborative" Series / Sesión 5 de 8 de la Serie "Colaboración de Aprendizaje para una Plática entre Profesionales" (view series main page for full details / consultar la página principal de la serie para ver toda la información) Provider Plática Learning Collaborative: Supporting the Training Needs of Practitioners of Spanish Language Mental Health Services Colaboración de Aprendizaje para una Plática entre Profesionales: Respaldando las Necesidades de Capacitación de los Profesionales que Prestan Servicios de Salud Mental en Español May 28: Session 5 / 28 de mayo: Sesión 5   Welcome to Session 5 in this series! / ¡Bienvenidos a la Sesión 5 de esta serie!   Collaboratively held by the National Training & Technical Assistance Center (NTTAC) and the Pacific Southwest MHTTC this Provider Platica program is a monthly collaborative space for peer learning and resourcing. This session and all that follow are an open, bilingual space for members of the mental health workforce to share common challenges and experiences when providing services to Spanish-speaking communities with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) as well as high-quality resources and innovative solutions. All levels of Spanish language proficiency and comfort are welcome. Este programa de Plática entre Profesionales, llevado a cabo colaborativamente por el Centro Nacional de Capacitación y Asistencia Técnica (NTTAC por sus siglas en inglés) y el Centro de Transferencia de Tecnología de Salud Mental del Sudoeste del Pacífico (MHTTC por sus siglas en inglés), es un espacio mensual de colaboración para el aprendizaje entre pares y la facilitación de recursos. Esta y todas las demás sesiones son un espacio abierto y bilingüe donde los miembros de la fuerza laboral de salud mental podrán compartir desafíos y experiencias en común a la hora de prestar servicios a las comunidades de habla hispana con un Dominio Limitado del Inglés (LEP por sus siglas en inglés), así como recursos de alta calidad y soluciones innovadoras. Son bienvenidas las personas con cualquier nivel de dominio del español y comodidad con el mismo.   Audience / Audiencia Mental health professionals across the country and U.S. territories, including clinicians, peer counselors and others who provide services to Spanish-speaking individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). We welcome providers in a wide range of professional settings, including clinical, community and government agencies, education, private practice, and more. Profesionales de la salud mental de todo Estados Unidos y sus territorios, incluidos médicos clínicos, consejeros entre pares y otras personas que prestan servicios a hablantes de español con un Dominio Limitado del Inglés (LEP por sus siglas en inglés). Les damos la bienvenida a profesionales provenientes de una amplia variedad de entornos, que incluye instituciones clínicas, comunitarias, gubernamentales, educativas, consultorios privados y demás.   About the Facilitators / Conozcan a las Facilitadoras Lisa Teyechea (she/her) is highly skilled and experienced in technical assistance, training, and project developer in areas of public health, prevention, and behavioral health. Other skills include evaluation and grant writing. More than 20 years designing and implementing systems of care and programming at agency and community levels, while approaching work with a trauma-informed lens. Lisa Teyechea (ella) está altamente capacitada y posee una enorme experiencia en asistencia técnica, capacitación y desarrollo de proyectos en las áreas de salud pública, prevención y salud conductual. Entre otras habilidades suyas se incluyen la evaluación y redacción de solicitudes de subvenciones. Posee más de 20 años de experiencia diseñando e implementando sistemas de atención y programas a nivel institucional y comunitario, abordando su labor desde una perspectiva informada sobre el trauma.     Kristi Silva (she/her) has over 15 years’ experience providing culturally responsive training and technical assistance – especially for Latine and Native American communities – at the local, state, and national level. In addition to subject matter expertise in health equity and policy, Ms. Silva is an experienced researcher and evaluator, with specialization in community-developed best practices requiring an adapted evaluation methodology. She has worked in partnership with communities impacted by pan-generational trauma to develop strengths-based policies and practices that are sustainable and rooted in a social justice framework. As a professional who now serves communities like the one she comes from, Ms. Silva brings an essential lens of lived experience to the work. Kristi Silva (ella) tiene más de 15 años de experiencia brindando capacitación y asistencia técnica culturalmente receptiva —especialmente a comunidades latinas e indígenas norteamericanas— a nivel local, estatal y nacional. Además de ser experta en asuntos de equidad y políticas de salud, la Srta. Silva es una evaluadora e investigadora experimentada, especializada en mejores prácticas desarrolladas por la comunidad que requieran una metodología de evaluación adaptada. Ha trabajado junto con comunidades impactadas por el trauma pangeneracional para desarrollar prácticas y políticas basadas en las fortalezas que sean sostenibles y se fundamenten en un marco de justicia social. Como una profesional que ahora atiende a comunidades similares a aquellas de donde proviene, la Srta. Silva lleva a cabo su trabajo con una perspectiva fundamental de experiencias de vida.     (view series main page for full details / consultar la página principal de la serie para ver toda la información)  
Webinar/Virtual Training
United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend "Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance: Wise Practices," a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length and will provide an opportunity for participants to:   Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens   May's topic will be a discussion on "National Bridge Overview: Bridging Emergency Care and Community Health."   The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music video and Native spoken word performances as part of each session. Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. Continuing education credits will be provided.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Other
  The Mid-America MHTTC is a proud sponsor and member of the planning committee for the Middle America School Mental Health Conference.    Learn more: Middle America School Mental Health Conference    
Webinar/Virtual Training
Learning Objectives: Summarize the clinical significance of new information regarding increasing diversity, equity and access within the early psychosis workforce. Assess factors that have led to structural inequities and lack of access to care. Apply new developments in providing youth-led outreach and community education about early psychosis.   Presenters: S. Kwame Dance PSYD, M. Friedman-Yakoobian Ph.D., TaKaya McFarland , & Vera Muñiz-Suarré This webinar will be presented in collaboration with the Massachusetts Mental Health Center GrandRounds series. If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.
Webinar/Virtual Training
ABOUT THIS EVENT The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with the Mountain West AIDS Education & Training Center Program (AETC) on this webinar series related to sexual health.  Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) data collection and documentation are a key component of enhancing meaningful dialogue during clinical encounters and promoting the provision of high-quality care. The collection of SOGI data are a critical step in systematically documenting and addressing health disparities affecting LGBTQIA+ persons. Client-provider discussions about SOGI can facilitate a more accurate assessment of self-reported health and behaviors. Accurate SOGI data collection is a vital part of establishing a good client-provider relationship and conveys competence and humility. The second session of the series will highlight best practices for obtaining and documenting SOGI data and help build provider skills and confidence in these activities. Learning Objectives  Define and differentiate sexual orientation, gender, and sex.  Differentiate gender modality, identity, and expression.  Identify how asking questions about sexual orientation, gender, and sex improves healthcare for the patient and explain this value to others.  Describe how stigma operates in healthcare environments and identify strategies to counter stigma.  Utilize affirming language when asking sexual orientation, gender, and sex questions of all patients.  Part 2 of the Sexual Health Series (click to view all sessions in this series). FACILITATORS Lydia Chwastiak, MD, MPH Dr. Chwastiak is a psychiatrist, internist and health services researcher who is a Professor in the UW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  Over the past 22 years, her research has focused on improving care and outcomes for people with complex needs in low resource settings, such as low-barrier primary care clinics and community mental health centers in the US, and primary and secondary medical settings in India and Nepal. Dr. Chwastiak is co-directs the UW Behavioral Research in HIV (BIRCH) Center, an NIMH-funded AIDS Research Center, and is the PI and co-director of the Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (NW MHTTC). Dayna Morrison, BA, MHP Dayna K. Morrison, BA, MHP, brings over 20 years of experience working with people living with HIV/AIDS in Oregon and abroad. In her current role as Program Manager for the Oregon AETC and Lead Faculty for SOGI (sexual orientation/gender identity), Ms. Morrison has provided capacity building assistance to health care systems, federally qualified health centers, and clinicians in efforts to build more inclusive healthcare environments. Additionally, she has coordinated the LGBTQ+ Health Coalition of the Columbia-Willamette since 2010 representing LGBTQ+ voices in Health Equity Workgroups through the Oregon Health Authority. Previous professional positions include Director of HIV Services at Quest Center for Integrative Health, and Program Coordinator for the CDC Global AIDS Program.   Rachel Greim, MPH Rachel Greim (she/her) is the Equity Manager with the Oregon AIDS Education and Training Center (AETC), located at the Oregon Primary Care Association. She is originally from southern California and moved to Portland to complete her MPH at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, where she focused on reproductive health, community health, and sexual and gender minority health. In her work at the AETC, she coordinates the biennial 2SLGBTQ+ Meaningful Care Conference and delivers trainings on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) to clinics and other healthcare settings. Her work also supports the Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Equity and Inclusion in implementing SOGI data collection by state-funded programs. In addition to her SOGI work, Rachel coordinates trainings on antiracism and trauma-informed care for HIV care and service providers around the state of Oregon.
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Event: In today's fast-paced work environment, understanding the intricate relationship between mental and physical health is crucial for fostering a thriving workplace. In this webinar, we’ll explore practical strategies and insights that can help enhance overall well-being and create a more positive work culture. Discover how the mind-body connection can transform employee wellness as we talk with health and fitness experts, Kendall Poole, NSAM, PN1, Prosper-NC and Kimberly Rammage, MSPT, DPT of H.E.R (Health. Empower. Restore) Solutions. Learning Objectives:  Understand the Mind-Body Connection and the scientific basis of how mental and physical health are intertwined. Implement physical activities into daily work schedules. Identify holistic approaches to wellness by integrating mindfulness, nutrition, and lifestyle changes to improve overall health. Demonstrate mindfulness techniques to reduce stress and increase focus.
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION Although occasional anxiety is a normal part of life, ongoing worry or extreme fear may indicate an underlying mental health concern. This webinar will explore the types of anxiety disorders, including phobias, prevalent in the Black community. These conditions are among the most pervasive, troubling, and disabling of mental disorders. The presentation will also discuss treatment options for this population. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define the types of anxiety disorders Identify the signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders Discuss pharmacologic treatment Discuss non-pharmacologic treatment PRESENTER Dr. Topaz Sampson-Mills is board certified in Adult and Forensic Psychiatry. Currently, she serves as a Staff Psychiatrist at the Menninger Clinic and Assistant Professor in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. After earning her Bachelor of Science from Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, she went on to complete psychiatry residency with the Menninger Clinic and Baylor College of Medicine. During residency, she had the pleasure of serving as Chief Resident and was awarded the Eugen Kahn Excellence in psychiatry award. Dr. Sampson-Mills completed her forensic psychiatry fellowship at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York where she served as an expert witness in several cases. Her career interests include medical education and community mental health. HOST Annelle Primm MD, MPH is the Senior Medical Director of the Steve Fund, an organization focused on the mental health of young people of color. She is also a member of the Black Psychiatrists of America Council of Elders. AUDIENCE This webinar is part of the Health Equity Webinar Series, an ongoing collaboration between the Central East MHTTC and the Black Psychiatrists of America to increase education and awareness surrounding mental health in the Black community. View past webinars in the series
Webinar/Virtual Training
Session Description: A primary concern in any healthcare setting is the safety of patients, staff, and visitors. This webinar will explore de-escalation techniques to help prevent harm to all parties involved, reducing the risk of physical injuries and psychological trauma and promoting a therapeutic environment conducive to healing and recovery. Responding to aggression with empathy and de-escalation techniques can help build trust, encouraging people receiving care to communicate openly and engage in their treatment. This webinar will also explore the topic of the interactions between mental health staff and people who are receiving emergency and short-term inpatient psychiatric care. We will identify research on the types of situations that commonly result in aggression between staff and people receiving care. Then, we will introduce a practical best practice model of communication that can be used to de-escalate difficult situations, encourage positive communication and promote a safer environment in outpatient settings.   Presenter Bio: Kenneth T. Kinter, MA, LPS has worked with people with mental illness throughout his 30-year career. This includes 25 years working in psychiatric emergency settings, partial care programs and in a county jail. He has worked for Rutgers University for nearly 20 years. His current faculty appointment is implementing evidence-based practices in New Jersey's state psychiatric hospitals. He has been based at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital since 2006 and the Ann Klein Forensic Center since 2019. Mr. Kinter is currently completing his Ed.D. and his dissertation involves predicting and preventing 30-day readmissions to state psychiatric hospitals. He has also published on Learn Thinking/Six Stigma, deinstitutionalization, wellness centers, inter-rater fidelity, and Illness Management and Recovery.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description Historically, school psychologists functioned in narrow roles in school districts, and many school districts lacked the mental health services students require.  Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) is based on a public health model of providing services and interventions to students as needed.  This training will discuss the components of a school-based behavioral health model that addresses students’ mental health needs from prevention/promotion to early intervention to intensive services. Learning Objectives: 1.Participants will understand the components of behavioral services in an MTSS model 2.Participants will learn about how universal behavioral health screening occurs in schools 3.Participants will learn about workforce development strategies needed to create an effective mental health workforce 4. Participants will learn how to develop partnerships required to implement comprehensive behavioral health models to schools Trainer Andria Amador, Ed.D, NCSP Andria Amador is the Senior Director of Behavioral Health Services for the Boston Public Schools (BPS).  Andria has dedicated her career to urban school psychology and began her career as a school psychologist before becoming an administrator.  Andria, along with her staff and partners, have developed the Comprehensive Behavioral Health Model (CBHM).  CBHM is a multi-tiered system of supports designed to support the behavioral health needs of students across a continuum of prevention, early-intervention and intensive services.  Implementation of CBHM requires BPS school psychologists to expand their scope of service delivery to include all NASP Domains of Practice.  Andria had the pleasure of serving as the Past President of the Massachusetts School Psychology Association.  She is the Delegate Representative for the Northeast for the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and is also the coordinator of the NASP Supervision Interest Group.
Other
  Learn more: Nebraska School Mental Health Conference    
Webinar/Virtual Training
Join Abbe Duke from OnTrackNY to learn more about the role of Peer Specialists on Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC) teams. This training will offer an overview of the OnTrackNY approach to the role of Peer Specialist, examples and lessons learned from implementation in New York State (NYS), and ample time for Q&A and dialogue. For more information, visit OnTrackNY.org to read Peer Specialist manuals, view Peer Specialist intro modules, and review many tools for the role.   Abbe Duke (she, her, hers) is a long time NYS Peer Specialist and the Recovery Specialist & Trainer supervisor at the OnTrackNY initiative at the Center for Practice Innovations. OnTrackNY is an innovative model of coordinated specialty care, which has thoughtfully integrated the role of Peer Specialist throughout its development. Abbe brings her decade of experience working as a Peer Specialist in a variety of settings throughout NYS, as well as her training and technical assistance work for the NYS Office of Mental Health and for OnTrackNY. Abbe is particularly proud of the development of the recent OnTrackNY Peer Specialist manual and the introductory training modules for OnTrackNY Peer Specialists- all of which can be found at OnTrackNY.org.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 90-minute virtual consultation call with ACT teams and ACT stakeholders consists of a mini-didactic training on a topic of relevance and interest to ACT teams, plus opportunities to pose consultation questions and learn from other ACT teams and their shared experiences within ACT. ABOUT THIS EVENT Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a multidisciplinary, team-based model that provides intensive community-based and outreach-oriented services to people who experience the most severe and persistent mental illness. The vast majority also have a co-occurring substance use disorder and many experience comorbid medical illnesses as well as homelessness. This is a vulnerable population and their providers – ACT teams – are at elevated risk themselves during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Northwest MHTTC is partnering with the Institute for Best Practices at the University of North Carolina to host and facilitate regular meetings for ACT teams. Goals of the meetings are to: connect with one another share strategies and resources for adapting team practices and communications facilitate connection to the most up-to-date resources This June, Juli Templeton RN, BSN, QMHP, TTS & Heidi Herinckx, MA will provide an update on the creation of an ACT nurse onboard training curriculum created by the Oregon Center of Excellence for Assertive Community Treatment (OCEACT). ACT nurses from five states participated in an extensive DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process, to describe the core duties and tasks essential to the role of an ACT nurse. A recent publication on the DACUM results (Herinckx et al., 2024) outlines the DACUM process. OCEACT is using the DACUM as a roadmap for developing a competency based onboarding curriculum. This presentation will describe the eight modules that are being developed and how OCEACT intends to provide the onboard training to newly hired ACT nurses statewide. OCEACT will describe the ACT nurse statewide trainer role and describe the onboard training all ACT nurses will receive in their first year of hire. For more information or questions, contact: Maria Monroe-DeVita, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine and Director of the Washington State Center of Excellence in First Episode Psychosis or Lorna Moser, PhD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Director of the Institute for Best Practice, Center for Excellence in Community Mental Health. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THIS SERIES FACILITATORS Lorna Moser, PhD Dr. Lorna Moser is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and the Director of the Institute for Best Practice, Center for Excellence in Community Mental Health.   Maria Monroe-DeVita, PhD Dr. Monroe-DeVita is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine and the Director, Washington State Center of Excellence in First Episode Psychosis.  
Face-to-Face Training
This event is being offered to a specific cohort and is not accepting applications.  ABOUT THIS EVENT The Northwest MHTTC is offering this training in collaboration with Partnerships for Native Health at Washington State University, the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and Portland Area Indian Health Services. This training is being held from June 4 - 5, 2024, at the Skagit Valley Hotel and Casino in Bow, WA. Learning Objectives Understand the fundamental aspects of the way of being with relatives/clients using Motivational Interviewing (MI). Learn to recognize change talk and sustain talk and how to respond to each in a good way. Utilize open-ended questions to develop discrepancy between ideal self and current behaviors in a way that encourages movement toward integrity. Day 1: 9:00am - 4:30pm Introduction to the Spirit of Motivational Interviewing (MI) Why MI for Native Communities Introduction to the Tools of MI Skill-building Exercises Day 2: 9:00am - 4:30pm Review & Discussion of Day 1 Skill‐building Exercises Deeper into Change Talk Rolling with Resistance Avoiding Traps Real-world application FACILITATOR   Lonnie Nelson, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Associate Professor, Partnerships for Native Health, Eastern band Cherokee (AniKituwah) Dr. Lonnie Nelson (descendant of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Arizona and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Rehabilitation Psychology at University of Washington's Harborview Medical Center. In 2012, he returned to the field of Native health disparities through the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Career Development Award (K12) at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Nelson joined the Washington State University College of Nursing in 2015. His work aims to address health disparities experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native communities through multiple avenues. His current research interests focus on the elimination of health disparities in urban dwelling and other Native populations through the application of culturally adapted evidence-based interventions and other patient centered approaches to changing health behaviors, such as indigenized motivational interviewing and harm reduction treatments. Outside of work, he enjoys making and using traditional Native archery gear and spending time with his 7-year-old daughter, Amelia.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Review DBT's history and outline the DBT treatment structure and process Explain the key components of DBT: Mindfulness Emotional regulation Distress tolerance Interpersonal effectiveness Understand mindfulness strategies and their importance in DBT Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.   Other sessions in this series: Session 2: DBT Skills Training: Strategies for Distress Tolerance Session 3: DBT Skills Training: Strategies for Emotion Regulation Session 4: DBT Skills Training: Strategies for Interpersonal Effectiveness
Webinar/Virtual Training
TUESDAY, June 4, 2024 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. PT Workshop 1 of 2 in the "Foundations in Perinatal Mental Health & Navigating Culturally Concordant Care" Series (view series main page for full details)   Registration Has Closed as This Event is Now at Capacity If you would like to sign up for the waitlist, please find instructions by clicking through the registration link. It is estimated that approximately 1 in every 5 birthing people in the United States will experience symptoms of depression or anxiety during pregnancy or postpartum. Additionally, perinatal depression is two times more likely to occur in marginalized communities and communities of color. However, only about 50% of individuals with symptoms are ever identified or receive appropriate and timely care. Community mental health care professionals play an integral role in the screening, identification, and care of perinatal mental health conditions. This 2-hour workshop is the first part in our series, and designed to educate and prepare community service and mental health care providers to differentiate between the most commonly experienced perinatal mental health diagnoses and to understand their impact on parents, their overall functioning, and their attachment relationship with their baby.   Learning Objectives Discuss the myths, stigmas, and stereotypes associated with parenting and their impact on mental health; Discuss the prevalence and incidence of perinatal mental health conditions and address the impact of unaddressed perinatal depression on individuals, families, and systems; Differentiate between perinatal mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, trauma, psychosis, grief/bereavement, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.   Audience We invite community and general mental health professionals and teams of two providers within the same organization to participate. Examples include: social workers, psychiatrists, counselors, psychologists, clinicians, therapists, physicians and peer support specialists.   Facilitator Anna King, PhD, LCSW, PMH-C Dr. Anna King (she/her) is a licensed clinical social worker, researcher, and certified perinatal mental health specialist. She has over 10 years of experience in community mental health and has specialized training and experience supporting individuals and families across the reproductive spectrum. As the full-time Director of Training for Maternal Mental Health NOW, Anna oversees the development of training programs, including conferences and partnerships with healthcare institutions, and facilitates curriculum development to educate care providers on mental health during pregnancy and postpartum. Before joining the MMH-NOW team, Anna served as a clinical social worker with outpatient oncology services and inpatient hospital units, including the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), birthing center, and emergency department. She is a part-time psychotherapist with ARC Counseling and Wellness, offering anti-oppressive, body-oriented therapy as a student practitioner of Somatic Experiencing® and trained EMDR therapist. She earned her PhD in Integral and Transpersonal Psychology after conducting qualitative research on the intersection of the Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) trait and embodied social justice.  
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