Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Webinar/Virtual Training
The landlord-tenant relationship and behavioral health are the focus of this 90-minute webinar. ABOUT THIS EVENT The landlord-tenant relationship has evolved considerably in the last 50-some years, and yet housing providers sometimes still behave like feudal lords of the land. A tenant who does not understand the actual terms of the modern rental relationship can be swayed by what sound like convincing statements or directives from their landlords, which actually are not in accord with current law at all. The landlord-tenant relationship works when both parties remain professional and businesslike. Generally, a large portion of the tenant’s monthly income is paid to their landlord. When paying for housing, tenants have the right to be treated fairly and lawfully. We will discuss working with landlords and property managers and owners who flout the law and make tenants believe genuine issues don’t matter. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation.      Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
A series of monthly calls for ACT psychiatric care providers. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Best Practices at the University of North Carolina. ABOUT THIS EVENT Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a multidisciplinary, team-based model that provides intensive community-based and outreach-oriented services to people who experience the most severe and persistent mental illness. The vast majority also have a co-occurring substance use disorder and many experience comorbid medical illnesses. The Northwest MHTTC is hosting a series for ACT psychiatric care providers. We welcome all ACT psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and other prescribers. Sessions will be held once a month on Thursdays at 12:00-1:30 pm Pacific/3:00-4:30 pm Eastern, May-July 2024. Our second session on June 20th will discuss Clozapine and long-acting injectables (LAI). Learn more about the series and upcoming sessions here. Slides FACILITATORS Robert Cotes, MD Dr. Robert O. Cotes is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He serves as Physician Expert for SMI Adviser (www.smiadviser.org), which is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and administered by the American Psychiatric Association. SMI Adviser provides evidence-based resources to clinicians, individuals with serious mental illness, and their families. He is Director of the Clinical & Research Program for Psychosis at Grady Health System, which comprises of three clinical programs.  The PSTAR Clinic provides evidence-based, recovery-oriented care for individuals with persistent symptoms of psychosis, specializing in the use of clozapine. Project ARROW is a coordinated specialty care team for people experiencing early psychosis, offering comprehensive, person-centered care using a multidisciplinary approach. Youth and Family TREE provides care to adolescents and young adults with a mental health condition and substance use. Dr. Cotes is an investigator for multiple research studies focused on treatment options for people with psychosis. His research focuses on clozapine and early psychosis.    Donna Rolin, MD Dr. Donna Rolin is a Clinical Associate Professor and the Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner program director at the University of Texas at Austin. She is active in the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, where she recently served on the national Board of Directors for five years, and locally in the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurses of Austin organization where she serves as president. Dr. Rolin consistently practices and teaches within an inter-disciplinary model. She has held the role of Clinical Nurse Expert on SMI Adviser’s initiative since 2018, which is an initiative funded by SAMHSA and administered by the American Psychiatric Association. She was appointed as Co-Director of the Institute for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA) in 2016, working alongside the Schools of Social Work, Law, and Bureau of Business Research. She recently presented research in England and Scotland with the IDVSA Director on longitudinal mental health outcomes related to campus sexual assault and best practices for establishing a medical home for international survivors of human trafficking, respectively. She practices as a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner with a community-based group working with underserved patients with serious mental illnesses and intellectual disabilities in community/ residential facilities. Dr. Rolin’s recent national and regional professional conference presentations focus on topics such as substance use disorders, psychiatric differential diagnoses, psychopharmacology, measurement-based care, and clinician burnout. Dr. Rolin is Co-PI on an Integrated Behavioral Health Scholars initiative funded through a HRSA Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) program and as consultant on a HRSA Graduate Psychology Education (GPE) grant   
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION This webinar will highlight aspects of mental health where Black American men appear to be at particular risk of poor outcomes when compared to men of other races/ethnicities. The sources of these disparities and strategies for resilience will be discussed. This presentation, in recognition of Men's Health Month, is intended for anyone wishing to provide care or support to Black American men. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Assess the current health of Black men in America Distinguish Black male mental health disparity within the overall health disparity Enumerate the roots of the mental health disparity Propose ways Black male health disparity can be reduced PRESENTERS Stephen McLeod-Bryant, MD attended the University of Rochester, receiving a BA, magna cum laude, in Cybernetics, then received his medical degree there in 1984. He completed his residency in psychiatry at the Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston, MA. After finishing his residency in 1988, he became a faculty member of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). After 24 years at MUSC, he left Charleston to join Meharry Medical College’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. In 2015, he left Meharry and joined the University of Miami’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. After nine years, he left as a Clinical Associate Professor. He was appointed a Co-Chair in the Dean’s Task Force on Structural Racism and Diversity and Inclusion Champion for the Department of Psychiatry. His academic interests included transcultural and public psychiatry. He is a recipient of the American Psychiatric Association’s Solomon Carter Fuller Award, member of the American College of Psychiatrists and is President of the Black Psychiatrists of America. HOST Annelle Primm MD, MPH is the Senior Medical Director of the Steve Fund, an organization focused on the mental health of young people of color. She is also a member of the Black Psychiatrists of America Council of Elders. This webinar is part of the Health Equity Webinar Series, an ongoing collaboration between the Central East MHTTC and the Black Psychiatrists of America to increase education and awareness surrounding mental health in the Black community. View past webinars in the series
Webinar/Virtual Training
This is an application, and not all people who apply will be able to get in due to class size. The South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) invites peer specialists from across Region 6 to apply for the Youth and Young Adult Peer Specialist training. The Youth and Young Adults Peer Support training was developed to train peer supporters on the topics of youth voice and issues specific to youth navigating mental health or substance use challenges. The Youth and Young Adults Peer Support training is available for anyone who works, or is interested in working, as a peer specialist. This three-day training provides participants with a foundation for youth experience with mental health and substance use challenges, the unique issues for youth navigating recovery and youth-serving systems, and best practices and tools for peer specialists looking to support youth. The training will also encourage participants to consider how to use their own lived experience when supporting youth through structured reflection, group discussion, and interactive activities. There is no age requirement for participating in this training. Applicants will be informed of acceptance before May 30, 2024. Applicants will be accepted on a rolling basis, so we encourage interested folks to apply early since space in the training may fill up quickly. Not all applicants will be accepted as we have limited seats available. The Youth and Young Adult Peer Support training is appropriate for anyone working or volunteering (or interested in working or volunteering) as a peer specialist. The only prerequisite to attendance is that participants must have previous formal training in peer support practice (e.g., their state’s Peer Specialist certification training, Intentional Peer Support, etc.). Priority consideration will be given to people who are interested in attending the YAYAPS Training of Trainers so that they may facilitate the Youth and Young Adult Peer Support Training in their communities. Learning Objectives At the end of this training, it is envisioned that participants will be able ​​to: Define the term “youth” Identify and practice effective ways of meeting youth and young people “where they are” Build authentic connections with young people based on lived experience, regardless of differences in age or other experiences Identify stigmatizing language used to describe young people and effectively reframe such language through the lens of peer values Understand how resistance or other actions may be forms of self-advocacy, communication, or responses to trauma Identify common responses to trauma that young people experience Support young people in exploring different ways to heal from trauma Utilize foundational knowledge of power and privilege to support youth experiencing oppression Assist young people in learning to advocate for themselves within the settings that young people must navigate Set and hold boundaries with persons served and coworkers Identify challenges and ethical boundaries for supporting family members of a young person     Facilitators Jessi Davis (she/they) is an experienced Program Coordinator and Peer Specialist with a demonstrated history of working in the Peer Support, Mental Health, and Substance Use Recovery industries. Jessi is known for work surrounding Youth and Young Adult Peer Support training, technical assistance, and leadership. Currently working at the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, Jessi works to provide support, technical assistance, and training to the Peer Workforce throughout the 5 states and all tribal communities within Region 6. They have spent much of their career focused on promoting access to quality Peer Specialist services across the lifespan.   Darcy Kues (she/her) is a Project Manager with the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and the Addiction Research Institute, where she writes curricula focused on peer support and recovery services. She has over 7 years of experience in curriculum development, grant writing, and program coordination for peer support services and recovery-oriented behavioral health. Darcy has developed trainings on reentry peer support, youth and young adult peer support, trauma responsiveness, peer support supervision, LGBTQ affirming services, and more. She is committed to building a world where recovery and lived experience are centered at every level of decision-making.
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Event: As mental health care providers work to address the needs of individuals in their day-to-day work, it can be difficult to treat mental health challenges without also treating the underlying contributors to those challenges. The Social Determinants of Mental Health (SDOMH) are the non-medical societal factors that influence the mental health outcomes of patients, peers, and clients. These intersecting conditions in which a person is born, in which they age, live, and work, all factor into that person’s health. If clinicians learn how these factors impact engagement in care and how to measure these factors’ effect on patients’ outcomes, then they can utilize more comprehensive and effective treatment strategies to address mental health needs. In this 1.5 hour webinar we'll discuss how to identify the SDOMH and how to measure for them in clinical practice. Learning objectives: 1) Describe how the SDOMH impact patients’ mental health, and their access to and engagement in care. 2) Discuss the benefits and challenges of implementing a tool to measure the SDOMH. 3) Describe one example of a measurement tool and how it can be utilized in practice.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This webinar series is geared towards clinicians working in outpatient settings with clients who present with a variety of mental health conditions including psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or mood disorder with psychotic features). This series will answer some common questions about working with individuals who experience psychosis and their families, including role plays and/or case discussions of common challenges. This June 25, 2024 webinar will provide cultural considerations and tips for culturally responsive care when working with individuals who experience psychosis. Some of the learning goals of this webinar include: Understanding the pervasive impact of culture on engagement, rapport building, assessment, and treatment outcomes. Identifying strategies to work on becoming a culturally responsive, anti-oppressive clinician outside of the therapy room. Developing a framework of development that prepares you to Receive and Respond to Feedback from people with lived experience of various different social identities and backgrounds. Building an ethic of cultural humility that centers respectful curiosity and openness to unfamiliar cultural and social concepts across the spectrum of ability, gender, sexuality, race, and culture. Differentiating between cultural humility, cultural responsiveness, and cultural competence as broader concepts that must inform a holistic idea of cultural understanding. Presenters: Vera A. Muñiz-Saurré (they/éle) is a nonbinary, queer, Peruvian public health professional of mixed Spanish and Andean ancestry working as a Program Coordinator and Peer Advocate for the Massachusetts Psychosis Prevention Partnership (M3P) and Building Bridges towards Equity in Psychosis Intervention and Careers (2B-EPIC) grants at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a Peer Counselor at the Lab for Early Psychosis at McLean Hospital. Vera is diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder, a survivor of conversion therapy targeting their sexuality, and identifies as Mad and a psychiatric survivor. Starting in 2017, Vera helped found and admin the Psychosis Spectrum Server on Discord and still helps maintain that community! Vera’s ideology and public health approach centers abolition of long-standing oppressive systemic structures, investment in harm reduction-based support services, and reindigenization of academic knowledge systems in both theory and application. Chia Hsuan Sabrina Chang (she/her) is a psychologist, Instructor at Harvard Medical School, and site supervisor for Boston University's Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology. She is proud of her identities as a first-generation immigrant and Asian-American woman, especially in the predominantly white profession of psychology. She has published several peer reviewed papers and a book chapter on cultural psychology and gender affirming care. She is passionate about providing culturally responsive, anti-oppressive therapy and supervision, the latter of which earned her the Teaching and Mentorship Award from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She is the founder of the Anti-Racism Task Force at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center, which was bestowed the Performance Recognition Award by the Department of Mental Health. In the community, she is passionate about using her expertise as a psychologist to instigate anti-racist change and received a citation from the Massachusetts Senate for her advocacy work.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Discuss interpersonal effectiveness skills for maintaining effective relationships, setting boundaries, and communicating needs Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.   Other sessions in this series: Session 1: Introduction to DBT & Strategies for Mindfulness Session 2: DBT Skills Training: Strategies for Distress Tolerance Session 3: DBT Skills Training: Strategies for Emotion Regulation
Webinar/Virtual Training
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2024 10:00 - 11:15 a.m. HT / 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. PT / 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. MT / 2:00 - 3:15 p.m. CT / 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. ET Session 6 of 8 in the "Provider Plática Learning Collaborative" Series / Sesión 6 de 8 de la serie "Una plática entre profesionales para colaboración de aprendizaje" (view series main page for full details / consultar la página principal de la serie para ver toda la información) Provider Plática Learning Collaborative: Supporting the Training Needs of Practitioners of Spanish Language Mental Health Services Una plática entre profesionales: Una colaboración de aprendizaje para profesionales de salud mental que prestan servicios a las comunidades que hablan español June 25: Session 6 / 25 de junio: Sesión 6   Welcome to Session 6 in this series! / ¡Bienvenidos a la sesión 6 de esta serie! Join us for a special session of our bilingual Provider Plática on Tuesday, June 25 when we discuss navigating acculturation and assimilation for optimal mental health outcomes with a special guest, Argenis Santamaria, the Parenting Programs and Outreach Specialist for Methodist Healthcare Ministries in South San Antonio! Don’t miss this opportunity to join your peers in community as we learn and explore innovative solutions to meet the unique mental health needs of Latine communities.   Únase a nosotros para una sesión especial de nuestra Provider Plática, una serie bilingüe, el martes, el 25 de junio, cuando discutamos  la navegación de la aculturación y la asimilación para obtener resultados óptimos de salud mental con un invitado especial, Argenis Santamaría, el Especialista en Programas de Crianza y Alcance Comunitario de Methodist Healthcare Ministries en el sur de San Antonio! No se pierda esta oportunidad de unirse a sus colegas en un espacio comunitario para aprender y explorar soluciones innovadoras para satisfacer las necesidades de salud mental únicas de las comunidades latinas.   Collaboratively held by the National Training & Technical Assistance Center (NTTAC) and the Pacific Southwest MHTTC this Provider Platica program is a monthly collaborative space for peer learning and resourcing. This session and all that follow are an open, bilingual space for members of the mental health workforce to share common challenges and experiences when providing services to Spanish-speaking communities with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) as well as high-quality resources and innovative solutions. All levels of Spanish language proficiency and comfort are welcome. Este programa de Plática entre Profesionales, llevado a cabo colaborativamente por el Centro Nacional de Capacitación y Asistencia Técnica (NTTAC por sus siglas en inglés) y el Centro de Transferencia de Tecnología de Salud Mental del Sudoeste del Pacífico (MHTTC por sus siglas en inglés), es un espacio mensual de colaboración para el aprendizaje entre pares y la facilitación de recursos. Esta y todas las demás sesiones son un espacio abierto y bilingüe donde los miembros de la fuerza laboral de salud mental podrán compartir desafíos y experiencias en común a la hora de prestar servicios a las comunidades de habla hispana con un Dominio Limitado del Inglés (LEP por sus siglas en inglés), así como recursos de alta calidad y soluciones innovadoras. Son bienvenidas las personas con cualquier nivel de dominio del español y comodidad con el mismo.   Audience / Audiencia Mental health professionals across the country and U.S. territories, including clinicians, peer counselors and others who provide services to Spanish-speaking individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). We welcome providers in a wide range of professional settings, including clinical, community and government agencies, education, private practice, and more. Profesionales de la salud mental de todo Estados Unidos y sus territorios, incluidos médicos clínicos, consejeros entre pares y otras personas que prestan servicios a hablantes de español con un Dominio Limitado del Inglés (LEP por sus siglas en inglés). Les damos la bienvenida a profesionales provenientes de una amplia variedad de entornos, que incluye instituciones clínicas, comunitarias, gubernamentales, educativas, consultorios privados y demás.   Meet Our Guest Speaker / Conozca a nuestro invitado especial Argenis Santamaría, a Native Central American of Maya/Lenka heritage, is a dedicated advocate for community development. He holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Southern California and an undergraduate degree in Child Development from California State University, Los Angeles. In his role as the Parenting Programs and Outreach Specialist for Methodist Healthcare Ministries in South San Antonio, Argenis focuses on enhancing parenting and leadership skills to build proactive communities that support the healthy development of children. In 2011, he founded the Soul Skating Academy in Boyle Heights, which has positively impacted over 480 youth in urban centers such as Los Angeles, Houston, and San Antonio. By 2014, he was collaborating with the City of Los Angeles on various skate programs, partnering with local agencies like the Department of Parks and Recreation and the Los Angeles Police Department. In 2015, Argenis expanded his influence by assisting organizations in creating grassroots community programs. His initiatives included piloting dental programs with wraparound services across LA County, conducting human trafficking education in Southeast Texas, and promoting Early Relational Health statewide. Argenis’s unique skill set, enriched by lived experiences, allows him to deeply understand community and youth development, leadership, public education, and social change initiatives. Notably, he has established several family leadership groups in Houston, elevating them to the steering committees within the Houston Infant and Children Coalition. He has also led grassroots projects in Los Angeles with East Yard Communities for Environmental Change to help reform local policies affecting residents. More importantly, Argenis continues to leverage his expertise in activating the Family Voice, showcasing his unwavering commitment to fostering positive change in communities of opportunity with a life-long investment of bridging people to one another.     About the Facilitator / Conozca a la facilitadora Kristi Silva (she/her) has over 15 years’ experience providing culturally responsive training and technical assistance – especially for Latine and Native American communities – at the local, state, and national level. In addition to subject matter expertise in health equity and policy, Ms. Silva is an experienced researcher and evaluator, with specialization in community-developed best practices requiring an adapted evaluation methodology. She has worked in partnership with communities impacted by pan-generational trauma to develop strengths-based policies and practices that are sustainable and rooted in a social justice framework. As a professional who now serves communities like the one she comes from, Ms. Silva brings an essential lens of lived experience to the work. Kristi Silva (ella) tiene más de 15 años de experiencia brindando capacitación y asistencia técnica culturalmente receptiva —especialmente a comunidades latinas e indígenas norteamericanas— a nivel local, estatal y nacional. Además de ser experta en asuntos de equidad y políticas de salud, la Srta. Silva es una evaluadora e investigadora experimentada, especializada en mejores prácticas desarrolladas por la comunidad que requieran una metodología de evaluación adaptada. Ha trabajado junto con comunidades impactadas por el trauma pangeneracional para desarrollar prácticas y políticas basadas en las fortalezas que sean sostenibles y se fundamenten en un marco de justicia social. Como una profesional que ahora atiende a comunidades similares a aquellas de donde proviene, la Srta. Silva lleva a cabo su trabajo con una perspectiva fundamental de experiencias de vida.     (view series main page for full details / consultar la página principal de la serie para ver toda la información)  
Webinar/Virtual Training
Intended Audience  This session is designed for SEA and LEA team members who want to gain an understanding of proven school mental health communication practices. It is ideal for those with a role in developing communication content about school mental health for school or district staff and partners.  Learning Objectives  Participants who join this session will be able to:  Understand key principles for communicating about school mental health.  Access a new graphic tool designed to illustrate school mental health resources available to school mental health providers and staff across contexts.   Strategically integrate graphic tools to support communication about school mental health.  Session overview  Why aren’t our providers on the same page about school mental health supports and services? Do we have clear, consistent strategies to communicate with school mental health providers and staff about a spectrum of supports in each school? This topical learning forum is dedicated to building capacity for teams to develop a shared understanding and shared language about resources and strategies that school mental health providers and staff can use to support student wellness. In addition to reviewing key principals about how to clearly communicate about school mental health to different audiences, this session will provide an overview of a new graphic tool for school mental health providers and staff. This session will also include an example from a school district that has leveraged this tool to facilitate communication among their school mental health teams. Participants will have access to the graphic tool post-event to facilitate a shared understanding for your team and school mental health providers/staff about where they show up in the landscape of student wellness.   Speaker  Christina Borbely PhD [“borbay”], is a developmental psychologist (Columbia University, 2004) in Aptos, CA. She is coordinator of professional development for Santa Cruz County California Behavioral Health Services and leads her own consulting firm specialized in translating research science into developmentally relevant and culturally competent practices. She strives to support thriving youth in healthy families within safe communities based on connecting evidence of what works to the people and systems serving them (e.g., teachers, social workers, administrators, or volunteers).  Her work provides direct training and expertise to public and private sector agencies, and administrations, as well as disseminates curricula, research resources, and reports to the field. With an emphasis on real world application of behavioral and mental health sciences, Dr. Borbely is a committed partner on a spectrum of projects. She is Project Director for the Comprehensive School Mental Health State Policy Academy and recently served as a senior advisor on school mental health to SAMHSA’s Southeast MHTTC. Her prior roles include leadership of state and federal infrastructure and policy initiatives, such as SAMHSA’s Pacific Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and SAMHSA’s mental health and violence prevention initiatives (Project AWARE, Healthy Transitions, and ReCAST). These professional experiences are a conduit for her passion working with communities to promote the wellbeing of children and youth.    
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and commuinities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 3, Action in Advocacy, participants will learn: Components of an advocacy plan Examples of effective advocacy     TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the series.     PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend "Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance: Wise Practices," a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length and will provide an opportunity for participants to:   Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens   The topic of June's session will be "A Walkaround – Behavioral Health Practices in Indian Country."   The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music video and Native spoken word performances as part of each session. Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. Continuing education credits will be provided.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with C4 Innovations to sponsor a limited number of seats for their summer e-course on trauma-informed practice. 6 hours of CE credits available* (learn more.) ABOUT THE E-COURSE  Using a trauma-informed, strengths-based, recovery-oriented approach is vital to providing effective health and behavioral health services. This course will include an overview of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual-communal impact of trauma, principles and practices of a trauma-informed approach, proactive ways to support post-traumatic growth and recovery, and strategies to reduce the impact of secondary traumatic stress and burnout risk factors experienced by staff. Click here for more information about the course. Learning Objectives: Explain the "four Rs" of a trauma-informed approach Give three examples of how trauma impacts people’s health and well-being Describe four elements of the mindset and heart-set of trauma-informed practice Give two examples of ways to facilitate post-traumatic growth Describe three strategies for organizations to become more trauma-informed Identify three ways to promote personal resilience and renewal Eligibility:  Members of the behavioral health/mental health workforce who are based in the states of Alaska, Oregon, Idaho & Washington (HHS Region 10) are eligible to participate Ability to complete all required learning activities outside of live webcasts Seats are very limited. We will notify you of the status of your application by Monday, June 17th Questions: please contact the Northwest MHTTC at [email protected] SESSIONS: Wednesdays, June 26-July 31 (skipping July 3), 2024 9:00 - 10:30 am AK / 10:00 - 11:30 am PT / 11:00 am - 12:30 pm MT FACILITATORS Ken Kraybill, MSW Ken Kraybill (he/him) has worked at the intersection of healthcare, behavioral health, homelessness, and supportive housing for more than 35 years. He is a Senior Trainer at C4 Innovations, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of care provided to marginalized and vulnerable people. Ken has 18 years of direct service experience working as a behavioral health practitioner and supervisor in homeless services. For the past two decades, he has been developing curricula and facilitating in-person and online trainings nationally on whole-person care practices including Motivational Interviewing, trauma-informed care, trauma-informed supervision, outreach and engagement, recovery support, Critical Time Intervention, and resiliency and renewal for care providers. He is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). Ken has an MSW from the University of Washington in Seattle and an undergraduate degree from Goshen in Indiana. Ann Marie Roepke, PhD Ann Marie Roepke (she/her) is a clinical psychologist, trainer, and consultant based in Seattle, WA. Her areas of expertise include trauma-informed care, resilience, provider well-being, and Motivational Interviewing. As a therapist, Dr. Roepke assists people with challenges including trauma recovery, anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substance concerns. As a researcher, she focuses on developing and testing new methods to foster resilience and post-traumatic growth in the face of adversity. As owner of Evoke Training and Consulting, Dr. Roepke provides training, consulting, and coaching to support professionals in doing their best work to serve others while tending their own well-being. Dr. Roepke earned her doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center and completed her postdoctoral training at the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System. She is a member of the American Psychological Association; the Society of Consulting Psychology; and the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). *Continuing Education Contact Hours Details Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUs with your licensing/credentialing entity. The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, substance use disorder professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620, WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240.
Webinar/Virtual Training
WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2024 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. PT Part 2 of 2 in the "Honoring our Boundaries; Tending to Self in the Context of Serving Communities" Series (view series main page for full details)   It is often those who support the wellness of others who struggle most to create and protect conditions in their own lives that allow for optimal health. It is critical to understand boundaries and the significant role they play in establishing self-care practices that are re-fueling and re-energizing. By exploring how establishing and maintaining healthy boundaries strengthen our ability to support youth and our own wellness, our work becomes more sustainable as mental health professionals.    This summer, join the Pacific Southwest MHTTC to explore the ways in which upholding healthy emotional boundaries can be trauma-healing and help strengthen our impact as school mental health service providers.    We will expand our self-care toolbox to heighten awareness regarding personal limits and recognize when we've reached them by becoming better equipped to enforce working parameters that stave off burnout and encourage regulation and restoration.   Oriana Ides (she/hers), School Mental Health Training Specialist and Youth & Young Adult programming lead with the Pacific Southwest MHTTC, guides participants in investigating the many reasons one might find it difficult to hold boundaries. Each session will provide an overview on what healthy boundaries are and offer dialogue and discussion on how to navigate challenges to our boundaries.   Audience Supervisors, managers, directors, administrators, and leadership of school and mental health organizations, agencies, and agencies Human resources professionals and mental health and school mental health providers (e.g., therapists, social workers, peer support professionals) Technical assistance providers, coaches, and consultants who work in school mental health contexts Trauma-informed professionals And anyone else interested in boundary work!  Note: while the focus will be on the context of boundaries and school mental health provision, we invite anyone to join.    FAQs Do I have to go to each of the two sessions? No (though we encourage you to!). Each session will be sufficient on its own. Will there be homework? No, but we will offer podcasts to listen to or readings to sit with between sessions to enrich the learning. What is the style of these sessions? These sessions will include a portion of teaching about boundaries, discussion (full group and breakouts), and some journaling and personal reflection. They are meant to be introspective and interactive. Will these be recorded? No, to maintain confidentiality of each session. Are there CEs? No, Continuing Education credits are not offered for this program.    Facilitator   Oriana Ides, MA, APCC, PPS (she/hers) Oriana Ides is a School Mental Health Training Specialist at CARS (the Center for Applied Research Solutions) and approaches healing the wounds of trauma and oppression as core elements of social justice. She has worked with young people across the life course from elementary school to college, and has served as teacher-leader, school counselor, classroom educator and program director. She is committed to generating equity within school structures and policies by focusing on evidence-based mental health techniques and institutional design.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION SAMHSA's Region 3 Central East Mental Health Technology Transfer Center partnered with Advocates for Human Potential, Inc. (AHP) to develop Black and Latinx Perinatal PTSD: What Behavioral Health Providers Need to Know. This four-session virtual training series aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of perinatal post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), specifically in the context of Black and Latinx mothers. Session 2 will delve into birth-related trauma. Throughout the series, participants will gain knowledge and skills to support and provide culturally sensitive care to Black and Latinx mothers experiencing perinatal PTSD. Trainings will build on one another but can also stand alone, so participants can attend some or all of the trainings. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recognize the prevalence and consequences of traumatic birth experiences among Black and Latinx mothers. Understand the complex factors contributing to trauma during the birthing process in these communities. Identify trauma-informed approaches to support Black and Latinx mothers who have experienced birth-related trauma. PRESENTERS Tiffany Malone, M.A., is a seasoned senior program manager at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP), bringing two decades of experience to her role. She spearheads the Mentored Internship Program under the California Department of Health Care Services’ Behavioral Health Workforce Development Initiative. As the Deputy Director, Tiffany provides strategic planning, oversight, management, and invaluable training and technical assistance (TA) to behavioral health organizations across California, aiding in the expansion of the state’s behavioral health workforce. With expertise in various training formats and extensive management experience, Ms. Malone is adept at driving performance and fostering growth within her teams. Prior to her time at AHP, she provided behavioral support to families, specifically mothers with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. She is deeply committed to advocating for Black maternal and infant health. Her dedication extends to her involvement with the African American Infant and Maternal Mortality Village Fund, where she champions holistic wellness services for Black and Latinx mothers. She actively addresses systemic issues contributing to maternal mortality rates among Black and Latinx women in Los Angeles County. Ms. Malone holds a B.S. in health management from Howard University and an M.A. in teaching applied behavior analysis from National University. Additionally, she is certified as a Master Life Coach, Cognitive Behavior Life Coach, and 200-hour yoga instructor.   Linzi A. Jack, M.A., NBC-HWC, is a senior program associate with AHP and a Board-Certified Integrative Health and Wellness Coach with more than 12 years of experience in the policy and organizational landscapes of behavioral health, homelessness, and substance use. She has a keen focus on advancing health equity by reducing the socioeconomic barriers that drive poor health outcomes for underserved communities. Ms. Jack provides dynamic thought leadership, logistical support, TA content development, and grantee support to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Behavioral Health Technical Assistance Program and the Illinois Regional Care Coordination Agency Projects at AHP. She has an extensive background in implementing large-scale quality improvement programs for Federally Qualified Health Centers, including the National Committee for Quality Assurance Patient-Centered Medical Home Certification and the Centers for Disease. Control and Prevention Immunization Quality Improvement for Providers program. Ms. Jack holds a B.S. in psychology from Howard University and an M.A. in integrative health and wellness coaching from the Maryland University of Integrative Health.
Face-to-Face Training
For registration information, please email [email protected].   Purpose:  The purpose of this summit is to have a strategic discussion and invite provocative ideas regarding the workforce needs within HHS Region 7 (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska) surrounding working with those who have a dual diagnosis of mental illness and an intellectual and/or developmental disability.    Description of Summit: Join us at the United Minds Summit, where diverse perspectives converge to delve into the significant challenges and questions surrounding dual diagnoses of Mental Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (MH/IDD). Explore the broader landscape and gain insights into how this intersection influences the workforce, subsequently shaping the quality of work and services. Our intentional focus on building and fortifying relationships with key stakeholders in the region aims to foster change and inspire future action. This summit provides a unique opportunity to assess the progress of each state, exchange knowledge on ongoing initiatives, and identify crucial areas demanding targeted attention.   Dive into focused discussions across three pivotal breakouts to propel progress in the realm of dual diagnoses of MH/IDD.  In the "Assessment, Treatment, and Intervention" breakout, engage in conversations addressing training and technical assistance needs at various service levels - strategic, service-oriented, or individual-focused.  Navigate the intricacies of “Crisis Intervention” in this dedicated breakout, delving into strategies and best practices to handle critical situations effectively. Explore innovations, share insights, and collaborate on enhancing crisis response protocols.  The "Systems" breakout will be a dynamic forum for conversations centering on available resources across different service levels. Together, we will set priorities, identify bottlenecks, and strategize ways to optimize the support systems in place.   Join us as we collectively work towards a more informed, responsive, and resource-efficient approach to the complex intersection of MH/IDD dual diagnoses. Together, let's chart the course towards a more impactful and inclusive future.    Agenda: 8:30-9:00 Check in & Registration  9:00-9:20 Welcome & Introductions  9:20-9:40 UCEDD, MMI presentation  9:40-10:20 Keynote Speaker  10:20-10:30 Keynote Q&A  10:30-10:45 Break  10:40-11:25 State presentations  11:25-12:05 Regional panel with state leaders Q&A  12:05-12:45 Lunch (UNO catering?)  12:45-1:45 Small group needs assessment  1:45-2:00 Break  2:00-2:50 Small group resource mapping  2:50-3:50 Whole group discussion and sharing  3:50-4:00 Closing remarks     
Webinar/Virtual Training
  The United Nations has set forth the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In part, these goals aim to advance “a plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity” and “realize the human rights of all” by centering global efforts on health equity. This 90-minute virtual session will define health equity, identify evidence-based practices supporting health equity, review priority populations affected by health inequities, and explain the far-reaching impact(s) caused by disparities in healthcare. We will also discuss other salient health equity topics including our evolution of understanding, an expanding unit of analysis, trauma-informed care, local-to-global (dis)connections, and policy-practice implications within the context of sustainable, collective futures.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of what health equity is and how it has evolved Identify the impact of health inequity and health disparity Learn policy and practice implications within the context of collective futures     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.      PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description This program aims to equip behavioral health leaders with the essential skills and knowledge to effectively lead teams and foster healthier organizational cultures. Participants will learn strategic and people-focused leadership methods through “Authentic Connection.” The goal of this training series is to enhance their ability to navigate uncertainty, ambiguity, and conflict while maintaining resilience and composure in a rapidly changing behavioral health landscape.  Participants will learn:   -          Explore strategies for fostering wellness and resilience to develop a healthier work culture within their scope of influence.  -          Acquire practical skills in self-care, compassion, and inclusive strategies to integrate into their professional roles.  -          Learn communication strategies to collaborate with others to develop adaptive strategies to address challenges in diverse teams.  June 27 - Session 1: Healthy Teams: Collaborative Communication   July 11 - Session 2: Healthy Teams: Reflective Supervision  July 18 - Session 3: Healthy Cultures: Managing Systemic Burnout and Stress  August 1 - Session 4: Healthy Cultures: Psychological Safety    Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk).   He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University.   His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more.   His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
Three unique perspectives…one unifying vision – a world in which every LGTBQ youth has access to an affirming school community where they feel safe, respected, and embraced.  Join us as we conclude Pride Month with a dynamic panel presentation offering insights from personal, parental, and professional perspectives borne out of groundbreaking work and advocacy in support of LGBTQ youth. Come be inspired and learn ways that you can contribute to urgently needed culture and systems change! Overview of common terminology and misconceptions of the non-binary and trans community Be informed about the current state of mental health and distress among LGBTQ youth Hear from experts with both lived and professional experience around the importance of gender-inclusive communities in supporting the wellness of LGBTQ youth Learn about ways to support and advocate for your LGBTQ child and maintain your wellness as a parent Hear about a range of practical school-based strategies for creating gender-inclusive, welcoming communities where LGBTQ youth can thrive Panelists Tony Ferraiolo is internationally known as a compassionate and empowering Life Coach who has earned his reputation as a thought-provoking and motivational speaker and trainer. Since 2005, Tony has worked with individuals, groups, and educational institutions to reach thousands of people worldwide. In 2008, he was the founder of multiple support groups for transgender and nonbinary youth and their families. The work Tony does has allowed him to see firsthand how children’s lives are transformed from hopelessness to hopefulness through the process of simply affirming their gender, and he has witnessed firsthand the positive impact that this has on them and their families. Tony is the subject of the award-winning documentary A Self-Made Man and the author of the book series Artistic Expressions of Transgender Youth. And his soon to be released memoir “Finding My Way Out of The Darkness.” He is the co-founder of the Jim Collins Foundation where he held the position of president of the board for ten years. Melissa Combs is the parent of two high school teens. Her journey through the public school system as the parent of a transgender child inspired her to launch the Out Accountability Project, an organization that aims to help schools create and maintain safe, affirming learning environments for LGBTQ+ youth. Professionally, she is a consultant and has worked with more than 50 nonprofits, primarily in fundraising, communications, and public relations. Christy Olezeski, PhD, is the Director and co-founder of the Yale Pediatric Gender Program (YPGP), an interdisciplinary team that provides services for transgender and gender expansive (TGE) youth and families in Connecticut. The team includes professionals in the fields of psychology, endocrinology, psychiatry, gynecology, reproductive medicine, medical ethics and law. The YGP mission is to provide comprehensive, interdisciplinary, family-centered care for children, adolescents and young adults questioning their assigned gender and/or seeking gender-affirming consultation and care in a compassionate, respectful and supportive environment. This program is regionally well-regarded, serving clients from all 8 counties in the state, as well as 7 states outside of Connecticut.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
ABOUT THIS EVENT This 90-minute webinar aims to equip professionals in the mental health and addiction field with the skills needed to effectively supervise and support peer support specialists and other lived-experience professionals in behavioral health settings. These individuals provide a valuable service by drawing on their own experiences with recovery to inspire others, model effective coping strategies, and support engagement in services. However, supervising them presents unique challenges due to the specific nature of their roles and the central role that their personal experiences play in their work with others. Through this webinar, you will gain insights into the complexities and unique challenges that may arise when supervising these professionals and how best to support them in the peer role. Learning Objectives: Develop a comprehensive supervision plan tailored to the unique needs of peer support specialists and other lived-experience professionals in behavioral health settings. Enhance communication and collaboration to create a supportive and inclusive work environment. Foster resilience and self-care practices to prevent burnout and promote well-being. Apply ethical considerations and boundaries in supervision. Understand the importance of ongoing professional development and support. FACILITATOR Heath Holt Hayes Heath Holt Hayes is a globally recognized award winner for his work spearheading public service messaging for the 988 Mental Health Lifeline and is nationally credited for innovations around the use of vending machines for opioid abatement initiatives. Heath is a professional speaker, media producer and business entrepreneur specializing in infrastructure and capacity development in the mental health and addiction space. Heath previously served as the Deputy Commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, received a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Central Oklahoma and completed graduate degrees from the University of Oklahoma in Human Relations, Administrative Leadership, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Heath’s most important achievement is being the adoptive parent of three Choctaw American siblings.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description The mental health fields have long been leaders in understanding and raising awareness of the importance of understanding power and privilege. Multiple critiques in the past decade, however, have suggested that an overly simplistic understanding of these constructs can impede personal and professional development in multicultural awareness and, as such, be detrimental to those with whom we work. Thus, in this presentation, nuanced understandings and analyses of power and privilege will be discussed on the basis of advancements in the anti-oppression and antiracism literature.    Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Online Course
The South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC), invites Region 6 Peer Specialists and Family Partners to participate in our monthly networking meetings. These no-cost, virtual meetings offer you the opportunity to collaborate with other Peer Specialists and Family Partners in a supportive, mentoring environment. The goal is to provide a space for resource sharing, support around ways to be most effective when working with clients, options for self-care strategies, and more! This event takes place on the first Friday of each month from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. CT.  About the Facilitator:  Jessi Davis (she/they) is an experienced Program Coordinator with a demonstrated history of working in the Peer Support, Mental Health, and Substance Use Recovery fields. Jessi is known for work surrounding Youth and Young Adult Peer Support training, technical assistance, and leadership. Their qualifications include Mental Health Peer Specialist, Recovery Support Peer Specialist, Peer Recovery Support Specialist – Transitional Aged Youth, and Digital Peer Support certifications. Currently working at the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, Jessi works to provide support, technical assistance, and training to the peer workforce throughout the 5 states and all tribal communities within Region 6. They have spent much of their career focused on Youth and Young Adult Peer Support and is currently the President of the National Association of Peer Supporters.
Online Course
The South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) invites peer specialists from across Region 6 to apply for the Healing & Power in Peer Support training. Studies have shown that most people will experience trauma at least once in their lifetimes. In order to be effective, peer specialists should have an embodied understanding of trauma and healing. The Healing & Power in Peer Support training was developed to train peer supporters on the concepts of power and healing-centered practice, and how those concepts impact peer support. The Youth and Young Adult Peer Support training is available for anyone who works, or is interested in working, as a peer specialist. The only prerequisite to attendance is that participants must have previous formal training in peer support practice (e.g., their state’s Peer Specialist certification training, Intentional Peer Support, etc.). This three-day training provides participants with a foundation for how power shows up in peer support relationships, how Healing-Centered Engagement principles can foster healing relationships and “power with,” and how peer specialists can integrate healing-centered principles into their practice of supporting others and themselves. This is a highly experiential training, where participants will integrate practice with their own lived experience through structured reflection, group discussion, and interactive activities. The application deadline is June 17, 2024. Learning Objectives: At the end of this training, it is envisioned that participants will be able ​​to: Identify the basic principles of Healing-Centered Engagement; Employ radical acceptance and empathy to foster healing relationships; Define the concept of “meaning-making” and how storytelling plays a role in healing; Apply skills for holding space in relation to supporting self and others; Describe the different forms that power can take; Assess power dynamics within a peer support relationship to foster “power with” another person; and Understand how racism and oppression impact power dynamics both broadly and specifically to peer support.     Facilitators: Jessi Davis (she/they) is an experienced Program Coordinator and Peer Specialist with a demonstrated history of working in the Peer Support, Mental Health, and Substance Use Recovery industries. Jessi is known for work surrounding Youth and Young Adult Peer Support training, technical assistance, and leadership. Currently working at the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, Jessi works to provide support, technical assistance, and training to the Peer Workforce throughout the 5 states and all tribal communities within Region 6. They have spent much of their career focused on promoting access to quality Peer Specialist services across the lifespan. Darcy Kues (she/her) is a Project Manager with the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and the Addiction Research Institute, where she writes curricula focused on peer support and recovery services. She has over 7 years of experience in curriculum development, grant writing, and program coordination for peer support services and recovery-oriented behavioral health. Darcy has developed trainings on reentry peer support, youth and young adult peer support, trauma responsiveness, peer support supervision, LGBTQ affirming services, and more. She is committed to building a world where recovery and lived experience are centered at every level of decision-making.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This training is full. If you'd like to be put on a waiting list, please contact Jen Winslow ([email protected]).   An Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Enhancing Your Practice and Your Life with Acceptance, Self-Compassion, and Values-Based Action. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is an evidenced-based intervention model grounded in mindfulness, self-compassion, and values-based action. Clients learn to encounter thoughts and feelings in a mindful way, neither dwelling on them nor pushing them away. At the same time, they are encouraged to act on their most deeply held values. In over 1000 randomized controlled trials and nearly 200 meta-analyses and systematic reviews, ACT has been shown to be efficacious for a wide variety of problems helping professionals address, including depression, anxiety, OCD, psychosis, substance abuse, chronic pain, dealing with cancer, stress, and stigma. Rather than going after reducing symptoms, ACT increases psychological flexibility: the capacity to turn to the present moment as a conscious human being and take action according to personally-chosen values. ACT can enhance your practice as professional as well move one, giving you a transdiagnostic evidence-based model from which to stand. But it can also impact your life, giving you a framework for preventing burnout, finding balance, and engaging meaningfully in the world outside of work. In this two-day, highly interactive virtual workshop, professionals of any experience level will be introduced to psychological flexibility both intellectually and experientially. You will learn what it’s like, in practice, to open up to thoughts and feelings without getting entangled in them, identify what truly matters to you, and take meaningful action. Training modalities will include brief lecture, clinical vignettes, clinical demonstrations, mindfulness exercises, experiential exercises, large group discussions, small group discussions, and small-group skills practice. This won’t be your typical slog of slides as you sit for hours with glazed eyes. You’ll get multiple opportunities to watch ACT demonstrations, practice ACT with yourself, and practice ACT skills with others. The workshop is intended to be both professionally and personally meaningful.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define psychological flexibility and identify its six components: acceptance, defusion, present moment awareness, self-as-context, values, and committed action. Identify three strategies for facilitating acceptance and willingness with clients. Identify three strategies for facilitating defusion with clients. Help clients contact the moment-to-moment experience of thoughts, feelings, and sensations without becoming absorbed in them or trying to push them away. Contact a sense of self that is more stable than transient thoughts and feelings and transcends personal narratives about who they are and what they are capable of. Facilitate conversations with clients about personal values and values-based behavior activation.   PARTICIPANT REQUIREMENTS Must have the appropriate technology and work environment to join the Zoom training sessions. Must actively engage during training sessions using both camera and microphone. Space is limited. Please only register if you are able to attend both days of the training, Due to the limited capacity, priority will be given to those working in HHS Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI).   CONTINUING EDUCATION Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 12 continuing education (CE) hours. CE certification will be managed by the co-sponsoring organization, UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work.   PRESENTER   Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist in the state of Utah and a Professor of Psychology at Utah State University, where he co-runs the ACT Research Group (with Dr. Levin). He received his B.A. and M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, his Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Reno, and completed his clinical internship at the University of British Columbia Hospital. He is past-President of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science, the organization most associated with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). His research focuses on the use of ACT across a variety of clinical presentations with an emphasis on obsessive compulsive and related disorders. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers, many book chapters, and 9 books, with the most recent being ACT in Steps (with Levin and Ong) and the Anxious Perfectionist (with Ong). His research has been funded through multiple sources including the National Institute of Mental Health and the IOCDF. In 2022, he was rated as currently the most productive author on ACT and that USU was the most productive institution in the world.   This training is co-sponsored by the UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Series: Cognitive behavioral therapy has shown itself to be an effective technique for a variety of experiences of psychological distress. These experiences include but are not limited to depression, anxiety, trauma, sleep disorders and rumination. In this four-week series, Dr. Green, takes you through the foundational aspects of cognitive behavioral techniques that can be readily applied to a variety of presenting concerns. We will cover some basic cognitive techniques and address some of the most common presentations for which cognitive behavioral therapy is utilized. We will also explore the cognitive approach of mindfulness. By the end of the four-week series, you will have additional tools to add to your clinical encounters with clients and mental health consumers. Please note, this is an interactive seminar with poll questions and breakout rooms. Session 1: Tuesday, July 9, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 2: Tuesday, July 16, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 3: Tuesday, July 23, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 4: Tuesday, July 30, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM
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