Identifying & Measuring the Social Determinants of Mental Health in Clinical Practice

Monday, June 24 | 12:00 PM (ET)
Register Today

Foundational Aspects of Cognitive Behavioral Techniques (4-part series)

Tuesdays in July | 12:00 PM (ET)
Register Today

Foundations of Dialectical Behavior Therapy

On-demand recordings now available
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Peer Perspective: 988 in Every State

On-demand recordings from our 3-part series now available
View Recordings

Region IV Mental Health Priorities

View the Report

Public Sector Healthcare Resources

View our data visualization resource
View this Resource

Identifying & Measuring the Social Determinants of Mental Health in Clinical Practice

Monday, June 24 | 12:00 PM (ET)
Register Today

Foundational Aspects of Cognitive Behavioral Techniques (4-part series)

Tuesdays in July | 12:00 PM (ET)
Register Today

Foundations of Dialectical Behavior Therapy

On-demand recordings now available
View Recordings

Peer Perspective: 988 in Every State

On-demand recordings from our 3-part series now available
View Recordings

Region IV Mental Health Priorities

View the Report

Public Sector Healthcare Resources

View our data visualization resource
View this Resource

Southeast MHTTC

Emory University Rollins School of Public Health
1518 Clifton Road NE
Atlanta,
GA
30322
HHS Region 4
AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN
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The Southeast Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (Southeast MHTTC), located in Atlanta, GA, is proud to serve the eight states in HHS Region IV: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  • Our Mission: To promote the adoption of evidence-based mental health services by providing training and technical assistance in the region.
  • Our Vision: Widespread access to evidence-based mental health services throughout the region.

Recent News

From the Southeast MHTTC
Jun. 04, 2024
In recognition of Mental Health Awareness Month (May 2024), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recently announced $46.8 million in notices of funding opportunities to promote youth mental health, grow the behavioral health workforce, improve access to culturally competent behavioral care across the country, and strengthen peer recovery and recovery support. These […]
Apr. 01, 2024
April is National Minority Health Month April is National Stress Awareness Month  National Public Health Week (April 1 - 7)
Feb. 06, 2024
SAMHSA recently published the "Consumer Guide: How Can a Peer Specialist Support My Recovery From Problematic Substance Use?"  This guide serves as a comprehensive resource to help individuals with past or current problematic substance use understand who professional peer specialists are, what they do in various work settings, and how to access and pay for […]

Upcoming Events

Hosted by the Southeast MHTTC
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Event: As mental health care providers work to address the needs of individuals in their day-to-day work, it can be difficult to treat mental health challenges without also treating the underlying contributors to those challenges. The Social Determinants of Mental Health (SDOMH) are the non-medical societal factors that influence the mental health outcomes of patients, peers, and clients. These intersecting conditions in which a person is born, in which they age, live, and work, all factor into that person’s health. If clinicians learn how these factors impact engagement in care and how to measure these factors’ effect on patients’ outcomes, then they can utilize more comprehensive and effective treatment strategies to address mental health needs. In this 1.5 hour webinar we'll discuss how to identify the SDOMH and how to measure for them in clinical practice. Learning objectives: 1) Describe how the SDOMH impact patients’ mental health, and their access to and engagement in care. 2) Discuss the benefits and challenges of implementing a tool to measure the SDOMH. 3) Describe one example of a measurement tool and how it can be utilized in practice.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Intended Audience  This session is designed for SEA and LEA team members who want to gain an understanding of proven school mental health communication practices. It is ideal for those with a role in developing communication content about school mental health for school or district staff and partners.  Learning Objectives  Participants who join this session will be able to:  Understand key principles for communicating about school mental health.  Access a new graphic tool designed to illustrate school mental health resources available to school mental health providers and staff across contexts.   Strategically integrate graphic tools to support communication about school mental health.  Session overview  Why aren’t our providers on the same page about school mental health supports and services? Do we have clear, consistent strategies to communicate with school mental health providers and staff about a spectrum of supports in each school? This topical learning forum is dedicated to building capacity for teams to develop a shared understanding and shared language about resources and strategies that school mental health providers and staff can use to support student wellness. In addition to reviewing key principals about how to clearly communicate about school mental health to different audiences, this session will provide an overview of a new graphic tool for school mental health providers and staff. This session will also include an example from a school district that has leveraged this tool to facilitate communication among their school mental health teams. Participants will have access to the graphic tool post-event to facilitate a shared understanding for your team and school mental health providers/staff about where they show up in the landscape of student wellness.   Speaker  Christina Borbely PhD [“borbay”], is a developmental psychologist (Columbia University, 2004) in Aptos, CA. She is coordinator of professional development for Santa Cruz County California Behavioral Health Services and leads her own consulting firm specialized in translating research science into developmentally relevant and culturally competent practices. She strives to support thriving youth in healthy families within safe communities based on connecting evidence of what works to the people and systems serving them (e.g., teachers, social workers, administrators, or volunteers).  Her work provides direct training and expertise to public and private sector agencies, and administrations, as well as disseminates curricula, research resources, and reports to the field. With an emphasis on real world application of behavioral and mental health sciences, Dr. Borbely is a committed partner on a spectrum of projects. She is Project Director for the Comprehensive School Mental Health State Policy Academy and recently served as a senior advisor on school mental health to SAMHSA’s Southeast MHTTC. Her prior roles include leadership of state and federal infrastructure and policy initiatives, such as SAMHSA’s Pacific Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and SAMHSA’s mental health and violence prevention initiatives (Project AWARE, Healthy Transitions, and ReCAST). These professional experiences are a conduit for her passion working with communities to promote the wellbeing of children and youth.    
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Series: Cognitive behavioral therapy has shown itself to be an effective technique for a variety of experiences of psychological distress. These experiences include but are not limited to depression, anxiety, trauma, sleep disorders and rumination. In this four-week series, Dr. Green, takes you through the foundational aspects of cognitive behavioral techniques that can be readily applied to a variety of presenting concerns. We will cover some basic cognitive techniques and address some of the most common presentations for which cognitive behavioral therapy is utilized. We will also explore the cognitive approach of mindfulness. By the end of the four-week series, you will have additional tools to add to your clinical encounters with clients and mental health consumers. Please note, this is an interactive seminar with poll questions and breakout rooms. Session 1: Tuesday, July 9, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 2: Tuesday, July 16, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 3: Tuesday, July 23, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM Session 4: Tuesday, July 30, 2024 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM

Products & Resources

Developed by the Southeast MHTTC
Multimedia
About this Resource: Mental Health Awareness Month is not just about community awareness, or being aware of the people around us. For those of us living in mental health recovery, being aware of ourselves—being able to hear, see, and interpret the signals our body and mind send us—is ​an important part of maintaining our recovery. Waiting for others to observe and comment on perceived changes in us can unnecessarily extend or even increase negative impacts of mental health concerns. In this on-demand recording, presenters discuss the benefits of having a self-care plan for daily living that is not crisis-focused, but a strengths-based approach that emphasizes nurturing wellness and strengthening resilience in manageable moments throughout the day.
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
1 in 36 school-age children have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Autistic students are much more likely than non-autistic students to experience mental health challenges, including difficulty with emotion regulation, anxiety, and depression that may be exacerbated by experiences of bullying, victimization, and segregation within schools. There is an urgent need to support the mental and behavioral health of autistic students. In this webinar event, Dr. Katherine Pickard will orient attendees to the resources – reports, infographics, webinar recordings, and more  –  the Southeast MHTTC has developed and disseminated on supporting the mental health of autistic students.   Learning Objectives: 1. Contextualize mental health support for autistic students as an urgent need. 2. Access key resources that support the mental health of autistic students, particularly regarding anxiety, executive functioning, and challenging behaviors. 3. Identify additional resources that explore nuances of how to support the mental health of autistic students including those with and without co-occurring ADHD.
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: As caring and competent providers, you realize the importance of having readily available tools to share with your clients whether you are meeting for the 1st or the 15th time. Few evidence based practices offer relevant and accessible skills for decreasing distress, or the vulnerability to distress, like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).  Although not a comprehensive DBT course, this 4 module seminar provides a snapshot of some of the foundational skills of DBT. Learn how you can integrate DBT-informed skills into your work with clients from a trauma psychologist trained in DBT approaches. Week 4: Learn skills for setting boundaries, practicing assertiveness and advocating for clients' needs  Differentiate characteristics of healthy vs unhealthy relationships Identify strategies to help clients clarify goals and objectives in interpersonal situations   For access to all resources from this series, please visit our DBT resource page here.
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