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Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Discuss interpersonal effectiveness skills for maintaining effective relationships, setting boundaries, and communicating needs Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.  
Published: July 9, 2024
Multimedia
This presentation discussed the history of cognitive remediation and its early application in medical conditions. We also talked about how psychology and psychiatry have incorporated CR into their techniques to treat psychiatric disorders, including psychosis. This talk showed a couple of clinical cases to illustrate how cognitive remediation can improve social skills and neurocognition.   Presenter: Luis R. Sandoval, Ph.D. - Psychologist, Clinical Researcher at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School   Dr. Sandoval is a researcher and a clinician in the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Sandoval is a senior psychologist, supervisor, and researcher with an extensive background in mood, cognitive, and psychotic disorders. Dr. Sandoval has over 20 years of experience applying his expertise in multicultural settings, translating theoretical and clinical knowledge into clinical, research, and academic contexts in English and Spanish. Dr. Sandoval has led research studies and collaborated on NIH, NIMH, PCORI, and NASA-funded studies, mainly focusing on innovative treatments for cognitive issues in mood and psychosis disorders using computerized intervention. Dr. Sandoval has served as a senior clinical research consultant at the Yale School of Medicine, NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Hartford Hospital, McLean, BIDMC, The Guidance Center, UT-Austin, among others.   Dr. Sandoval's expertise includes applying cognitive remediation in medical conditions (i.e., Sturge Weber,  Epilepsy, TBI) and psychiatric conditions, including psychosis, depression, Bipolar Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorders, ADHD, and other neurocognitive illnesses. Additionally, Dr. Sandoval's research and clinical areas include digital psychiatry and psychodynamic psychotherapy.   As part of his research work, Dr. Sandoval trains and supervises clinicians in cognitive remediation treatments for early and chronic psychosis across the U.S. and how to improve cognition in medical and psychiatric conditions, combining digital tools with evidence-based therapies.
Published: July 1, 2024
Multimedia
This June 25, 2024 webinar provided cultural considerations and tips for culturally responsive care when working with individuals who experience psychosis. Some of the learning goals of this webinar included: Understanding the pervasive impact of culture on engagement, rapport building, assessment, and treatment outcomes. Identifying strategies to work on becoming a culturally responsive, anti-oppressive clinician outside of the therapy room. Developing a framework of development that prepares you to Receive and Respond to Feedback from people with lived experience of various different social identities and backgrounds. Building an ethic of cultural humility that centers respectful curiosity and openness to unfamiliar cultural and social concepts across the spectrum of ability, gender, sexuality, race, and culture. Differentiating between cultural humility, cultural responsiveness, and cultural competence as broader concepts that must inform a holistic idea of cultural understanding. Presenters: Vera A. Muñiz-Saurré (they/éle) is a nonbinary, queer, Peruvian public health professional of mixed Spanish and Andean ancestry working as a Program Coordinator and Peer Advocate for the Massachusetts Psychosis Prevention Partnership (M3P) and Building Bridges towards Equity in Psychosis Intervention and Careers (2B-EPIC) grants at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a Peer Counselor at the Lab for Early Psychosis at McLean Hospital. Vera is diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder, a survivor of conversion therapy targeting their sexuality, and identifies as Mad and a psychiatric survivor. Starting in 2017, Vera helped found and admin the Psychosis Spectrum Server on Discord and still helps maintain that community! Vera’s ideology and public health approach centers abolition of long-standing oppressive systemic structures, investment in harm reduction-based support services, and reindigenization of academic knowledge systems in both theory and application. Chia Hsuan Sabrina Chang (she/her) is a psychologist, Instructor at Harvard Medical School, and site supervisor for Boston University's Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology. She is proud of her identities as a first-generation immigrant and Asian-American woman, especially in the predominantly white profession of psychology. She has published several peer reviewed papers and a book chapter on cultural psychology and gender affirming care. She is passionate about providing culturally responsive, anti-oppressive therapy and supervision, the latter of which earned her the Teaching and Mentorship Award from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She is the founder of the Anti-Racism Task Force at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center, which was bestowed the Performance Recognition Award by the Department of Mental Health. In the community, she is passionate about using her expertise as a psychologist to instigate anti-racist change and received a citation from the Massachusetts Senate for her advocacy work.
Published: June 26, 2024
Presentation Slides
First-episode psychosis can strip away one's identity, obscure one’s history, and shatter one’s vision for the future. And often, this process happens through contact with the mental health system, rather than the condition itself. At just 17 years old, Leah Giorgini found herself navigating a descent to invisibility after a traumatic childhood marred with violence, neglect, and parental death led to a first episode of psychosis. Once a high achiever, Leah became a patient adrift from the world, paralyzed by antipsychotic medication and low expectations. However, when a progressive therapist lent Leah a book about Feminist Perspectives on Mental Health, Leah suddenly felt seen as a whole person in context and began to reemerge as a visible and capable individual. Now an Occupational Therapist working in nonprofit leadership, Leah is working to change the societal inequities that lead to and perpetuate human suffering. She will present her story and outline how connecting the dots of trauma, intersectionality, and occupation can lead to rights-based care that helps people feel seen and empowered.  By the end of this training, participants will be able to:  Describe the importance of acknowledging intersectionality in mental health care, particularly in understanding how various aspects of identity, such as gender, race, and socioeconomic status, intersect with experiences of psychosis and recovery.  Describe the role of occupation in the recovery process for individuals with first-episode psychosis, and understand how occupational therapy principles can be integrated into rights-based care approaches to support individuals in regaining agency and meaning in their lives.  Identify the key factors contributing to the social invisibility experienced by individuals with first-episode psychosis, including the impact of interactions with the mental health system.  About the Presenter: Leah is a British-Indonesian immigrant who moved from England to the United States in 2016. As a psychiatric survivor, domestic violence survivor, former foster youth, and a person who has previously experienced homelessness, Leah is working towards a world free of oppression and injustice. She believes that promoting psychological and social approaches to psychosis is equity in action towards this vision.  Trained as an Occupational Therapist, Leah primarily worked in clinical mental health settings until she came to the United States, where she found a home working in nonprofit leadership. Leah has worked in an array of settings with people diagnosed with psychosis, including working in early intervention in psychosis, assertive outreach, a mental health recovery café, a high-secure forensic hospital, and homeless emergency shelters. She currently serves as Executive Director of the US Chapter of the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS-US.)   
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
Living with a psychotic disorder can be an experience of uncertainty, isolation, and diminished hope for young people and their loved ones. For providers, supporting people with complex psychological conditions increases the risk of burnout. This presentation discusses how intentional kindness and community-building strategies are good medicine practices that can benefit young people with psychosis, families, and care teams.  This presentation challenges providers face to maintain spaces that support deep human connection: This presentation will discuss specific barriers and responses to barriers faced during the last three years to sustain and expand human connection among program participants and care team members.  Learning Objectives Have a greater understanding of the subtle and explicit ways how psychotic disorders impact a large network of people, to include young people experiencing symptoms, family members, and care providers.   Review the positive impact that kindness practices and intentional human connection have in people’s physical, mental and spiritual health.   Discuss specific ways how EPICenter (A FEP in Tucson Arizona) integrates kindness practices and community building initiatives as core components of their program.     About the Presenter: Gustavo Perez, PhD, (he/him) is a clinical associate professor at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Psychiatry Department where he directs the Early Psychosis Intervention Center (EPICenter). Dr. Perez's priorities include: Supporting young adults with serious mental illness in building a life of connection and purpose, advocating for families, preparing the next generation of providers to offer best diagnostic and intervention practices, and engaging with local communities to reduce stigma and increase opportunities for youth in different stages of psychotic disorder. Dr. Perez is a licensed psychologist and a certified trauma specialist. He completed his doctorate degree in school psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and his clinical psychology internship at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. Prior to joining the University of Arizona, Dr. Perez was the chief psychologist at the Pima County Juvenile Detention Center in Tucson AZ.
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
In this 60-min session we will explore the common challenges providers face when supporting people who see, hear, and otherwise experience things that others around them do not. Tasked with time-sensitive concrete requirements, such as completing an eligibility assessment or person-centered recovery plan (PCRP), professionals may struggle to meet the needs of the behavioral health system while also prioritizing the more immediate and subjective needs of the human being in front of them. Join Amy and Amanda as they share from both their relevant personal and professional experience regarding this challenge and highlight ideas for staying connected with yourself and the people you support. Although the session is brief, attendees can expect story-telling, short examples, and a few take-home resources.  Learning Objectives: Describe two actions that promote trust and partnership during a mental health distress,  Name two behaviors professionals should avoid that can damage the relationship with people who are hearing and seeing things that others do not, and  Identify an approach that simultaneously balances the needs of the person and the system.    About the Presenters: Amanda Bowman, LCSW-S, PSS (she/her) is a clinical social worker, certified peer specialist supervisor, and WRAPⓇ facilitator, using her professional and lived experience with mental health challenges to promote person-centered practices in behavioral health care. Coming from direct social work practice and administrative leadership within the public mental health system, she joined Via Hope in 2013, where she served as Recovery Institute Director until 2023. In this role, she oversaw the development and delivery of organizational change programs, which included statewide initiatives to support the implementation of person-centered planning, peer support services, and trauma-responsive work environments. Now the owner of Sidecar Consulting, Amanda uses her passion for participatory learning methods to facilitate collaborative learning events and serves as a subject matter expert for programs designed to support change within and across agencies. She has called Austin home since 2000 when she moved from Louisiana to obtain a Master’s degree at UT. Outside of work, you may find Amanda with her family hiking the Barton Creek Greenbelt or enjoying live music. Amy Pierce (she/her) has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for almost two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Manager at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and  other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, implementing peer support programs in the community as well as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   Prior to Via Hope, she was the CEO of Resiliency Unleashed, an international training and consulting company. Amy is a peer, and family member, with both mental health and addictions experience. Amy was previously Chair of the PAIMI Council in Texas and currently serves on the Disability Rights Texas Board of Directors.
Published: June 25, 2024
Presentation Slides
This presentation will explore ways to make meaning of experiences labeled as psychosis, as well as identify strategies for building partnerships to help navigate those experiences along the way. As we learn to pause and unpack not only our own purpose, but also the perspectives of those we are supporting, we can deepen our connections and more easily find the path to guide people toward becoming the experts of their own experiences in a way that works for them. Approaches from the Hearing Voices Movement and Intentional Peer Support will be introduced through the values of the Wildflower Alliance. Over a decade of working with people and their families – as well as a lifetime of first-hand experiences of voices, visions and unusual and extreme states – will inform the presentation.  Learning Objectives:  Participants will be able to name at least strategies for managing voices and extreme states beyond medication and distraction.  Participants will be able at least two ways trauma can impact the type of voices and unusual beliefs a person may have.  Participants will be able to name two dialogue approaches that increase connection and partnership    About the Presenter:  Cindy Hadge is an internationally recognized educator providing training and consultations to mental health providers, worldwide who are looking for innovative ways to approach voice-hearing, extreme states, and trauma. She draws from her own experience of childhood trauma, experiences in the traditional mental health system, and navigating her own voices, visions, and unusual beliefs. She is passionate about developing and facilitating healing spaces for those going through these kinds of experiences and their families. Cindy is a pioneer in developing Hearing Voices Network USA Family and Friends Groups in 2019 and has been an HVN USA trainer since 2012. Cindy is the Lead Trainer for the Wildflower Alliance as well as an Intentional Peer Support trainer.
Published: June 25, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Implementing Policies and Practices to Support LGBTQ+ Youth in Schools, Part 1 originally held on June 11, 2024.
Published: June 20, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Explore emotion regulation strategies and their importance in DBT Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.
Published: June 19, 2024
Multimedia
This Family Workforce event featured the National Federation of Families and a panel of their New England affiliates. Gail Cormier, Project Director with the National Federation of Families, talked about National offerings including Family Peer Support certification, Family workforce education and technical assistance, and their transition to lifespan support as well as general offerings. Representatives from New England affiliates introduced their affiliates highlighting any unique offerings in their prospective states. This webinar was an excellent opportunity for providers who work with families to learn about the offerings of the National Federation of Families and local affiliates as well as anyone who might be interested.
Published: June 14, 2024
Multimedia
As peer workers, we are committed to providing the best care possible, rooted in peer-centered values of choice, autonomy, and ethics. Join us for a 2-hour presentation and discussion on the ethics of peer support, with a special focus on the impact of perceived credibility on our work and support for peers.   Key Takeaways: A comprehensive understanding of perceived credibility and shared reality, and how those concepts impact the work of peer workers and the individuals they support. An understanding of the role of ethics in peer work. An understanding of how to discuss ethical concerns with peers, peer workers, and clinical coworkers.   Presenter: Rowan Willis-Powell (she/they) is an experienced systems transformation advocate with 10 years of experience using their living expertise to uplift the voices of youth peers, guide development of youth peer programs, educate the behavioral health community about supporting LGBTQIA individuals, and advocate for appropriate and equitable suicide prevention and intervention for youth. Rowan has 10 years of experience connecting and mentoring young adults with lived experience in behavioral health service settings to peer support career pathways and leadership opportunities on community, state, and national levels. Rowan has supported numerous organizations and groups with the process of developing or strengthening their youth serving programs and always strives to ensure that youth voice and youth engagement are at the focus of the work.
Published: June 13, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording   Event Description Join us in welcoming Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT, Director of Caring Connections, as she presents a timely and informative overview of the Caring Connections program. Caring Connections: A Hope and Comfort in Grief Program is based in the University of Utah College of Nursing and is a leading community resource for grief and bereavement support.  Caring Connections provides grief care and education for clinicians and students and contributes to the scientific evidence to support best practices. In this one-hour training, participants will also learn about the nuances and impacts of traumatic grief, particularly as it relates to loss by suicide or overdose. Traumatic deaths, such as suicide or death by overdose, are on the increase and have a far-reaching impact on immediate survivors and communities. An estimated 47,000 persons die by suicide in the United States annually. For every death by suicide, 135 persons—family members or friends—are impacted. While almost 42,000 people in the United States died from opioids in 2016, and that number continues to increase.   Unaddressed traumatic grief can negatively impact both individual and community mental health. Recognizing and working with the stigma and trauma attached to these deaths benefits everyone. Grief is highly individualized. This means that each person responds to grief differently according to:   How the family member or friend was lost  The grieving person’s personality  Social norms within the grieving person’s culture and family  Other stressors in the grieving person’s life  The grieving person’s history of coping with other losses  The target audience for this training includes first responders, behavioral health clinicians, social workers, addiction counselors, crisis workers, and those whose work brings them into contact with persons impacted by traumatic death.    Trainer Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT 
Published: June 12, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Examine distress tolerance skills for navigating a crisis and intense emotions Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.
Published: June 12, 2024
Presentation Slides
  Join us for an informative webinar focused on Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMADs). Delve into crucial topics for understanding and addressing mental health challenges during the perinatal period. Our expert speaker will cover the prevalence, signs, and symptoms of common mental disorders experienced by birthing parents. Discover valuable insights into recognizing the signs of Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder symptoms and exploring practical coping and management strategies. We'll discuss a range of resources available to expecting parents and their families, empowering them with actionable steps to navigate the perinatal journey with resilience and support   Presenter: Marianela Rodriguez, PhD, PMH-C, is a mother, Certified Lactation Educator, and Clinical Psychologist certified in Perinatal Mental Health. For the past 15 years, she has worked exclusively in the perinatal mental health field. She is a PSI Volunteer Coordinator in Puerto Rico and an international trainer with the organization. She is a psychology consultant for the Puerto Rico Health Department, Mother, Child, and Adolescent Section (Title V) and a member of the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Board (FIMR). She provides supportive psychotherapy for PLWHIV at the Center for Maternal Infant Studies at the University of Puerto Rico. In 2020, she co-founded the first Center for Perinatal Mental Health in Puerto Rico, focusing on research, awareness, and service for this population.
Published: June 10, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The June 2024 issue features content celebrating Pride Month, PTSD Awareness Month, and Intersection of Addiction and Racism: A Curated Bibliography‒a new comprehensive resource created by AMERSA, the ATTC NCO, and the PTTC NCO. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: June 6, 2024
Presentation Slides
  This 4-part webinar series on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) offers an exploration of DBT's core modules, designed to enhance the skills of students and new professionals. This series is designed to provide a foundational overview of DBT to cover the skills for mindfulness and how to help individuals stay present in the moment, regulate emotions and reduce emotional vulnerability, cope with crises and difficult situations without making them worse, and navigate interpersonal relationships effectively. Throughout the series, participants will gain valuable insights and practical techniques to support individuals in applying tools to their daily lives. Webinar objectives: Review DBT's history and outline the DBT treatment structure and process Explain the key components of DBT: Mindfulness Emotional regulation Distress tolerance Interpersonal effectiveness Understand mindfulness strategies and their importance in DBT Review a case study and practical examples of using these skills with clients   Presenter: Crystal Socha, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC, ACS (she/her) is a PhD Candidate and Senior Training and Consultation Specialist at Rutgers School of Health Professions in the Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions. Crystal's primary role includes providing in-person and remote training, consultation, and technical assistance to New Jersey agencies that provide Community Support Services. She has over 10 years of experience in the behavioral health field, delivering trauma-informed, culturally responsive, gender-affirming care and supporting individuals in building a life worth living. Before joining Rutgers, she provided recovery-oriented services in supportive housing, intensive in-home and in-community settings, community mental health centers, integrated primary care, hospital systems, and private practices. She has received a 40-hour foundational training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) by a Linehan Board Certified Clinician and utilizes a DBT informed approach within her work as a counselor.
Published: June 6, 2024
Multimedia
Abbe Duke from OnTrackNY discusses the role of Peer Specialists on Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC) teams. This training offered an overview of the OnTrackNY approach to the role of Peer Specialist, examples and lessons learned from implementation in New York State (NYS), and ample time for Q&A and dialogue. For more information, visit OnTrackNY.org to read Peer Specialist manuals, view Peer Specialist intro modules, and review many tools for the role.   Abbe Duke (she, her, hers) is a long time NYS Peer Specialist and the Recovery Specialist & Trainer supervisor at the OnTrackNY initiative at the Center for Practice Innovations. OnTrackNY is an innovative model of coordinated specialty care, which has thoughtfully integrated the role of Peer Specialist throughout its development. Abbe brings her decade of experience working as a Peer Specialist in a variety of settings throughout NYS, as well as her training and technical assistance work for the NYS Office of Mental Health and for OnTrackNY. Abbe is particularly proud of the development of the recent OnTrackNY Peer Specialist manual and the introductory training modules for OnTrackNY Peer Specialists- all of which can be found at OnTrackNY.org.   This webinar was co-hosted by the Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET, www.mapnet.online)
Published: June 3, 2024
Multimedia
Learning Objectives: Summarize the clinical significance of new information regarding increasing diversity, equity and access within the early psychosis workforce. Assess factors that have led to structural inequities and lack of access to care. Apply new developments in providing youth-led outreach and community education about early psychosis.   Presenters: S. Kwame Dance PSYD, M. Friedman-Yakoobian Ph.D., TaKaya McFarland , & Vera Muñiz-Suarré This webinar waspresented in collaboration with the Massachusetts Mental Health Center GrandRounds series.
Published: June 3, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Using Data to Promote Equity, originally presented on 5/14/2024. Slide presentation
Published: May 23, 2024
Multimedia
    Session 1 - March 11 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 2 - March 25 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 3 - April 15 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 4 - April 22 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 5 - May 6 Resources coming soon! Click here to view the recording Session 6 - May 20 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Series Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP, is returning to lead our first Mindful Monday series, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice, for Spring 2024. Join us as we continue to explore and experience different mindfulness practices related to the topics of creativity, rest, and self-care. This series is for anyone who desires to improve their overall well-being, resilience, and mental health.  The practices that are presented in the training are designed for quick and effective implementation both personally and professionally.  For mental and behavioral health practitioners these techniques can be easily incorporate into their practice.  Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” Attendees who have participated in past Mindful Monday series have the following to say about the training: “Incredibly validating experience”, “Love doing this- can we do it indefinitely”, “Thank you for this training. It is hard to recognize we also deserve to be heard, have needs/wants and slow down and breathe for a while.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on March 11th and will run every other week through May 20th, 2024.  Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Trainer Christina Ruggiero Master’s Counselling Psychology  Registered Psychotherapist 
Published: May 20, 2024
Multimedia
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic. The topic of webinar session 3 was "Peer Specialist Roles in PCRP-Aligning with Peer Ethics & Values." We know that in person-centered recovery planning (PCRP), the person receiving services makes decisions and takes ownership of their plan for recovery. This can be a new and uncomfortable role for people initially, for a variety of reasons. Peer supporters join with individuals to discover and advocate for what they want and need. This does not mean that the peer provider will always agree with people’s choices — however, it’s ALWAYS their ethical responsibility to support individuals in their unique recovery journey as that individual defines it. This 90-min webinar highlighted the mutually beneficial relationship between PCRP and peer support, as well as how staff at clinical provider organizations can intentionally enhance this connection. Participants were invited to explore tensions that arise when peer professionals work to maintain their never-directive, non-clinical stance while immersed in an environment that is heavily defined by clinical professionals, processes and services.   At the end of the session, participants were able to: Describe a “must do” and a “must not do” related to the role of peer support in PCRP, Name one way that professional peer support ethics supports a person-centered approach, and Identify two resources to support and promote peer provider role clarity in PCRP.   Presenters: Janis Tondora, Amy Pierce, and Amanda Bowman Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs.  
Published: May 16, 2024
Presentation Slides
Session Recording: Description: Anyone who has tried to help a loved one obtain treatment for a substance use disorder knows how challenging it can be to find quality, affordable care that’s accessible when someone is ready for help. Even for professionals working in healthcare and related fields, evaluating the options available and navigating payment and other hurdles can be overwhelming. This workshop will help educate participants about treatment options for opioid, stimulant and other substance use disorders and how to overcome barriers to care. We’ll discuss factors to consider for treatment referrals, resources to connect people with peer support, and how services are evolving to support families and offer person-centered, trauma-informed care. We’ll also discuss the neurobiology of addiction, how brain changes can impact decision-making, and strategies to improve treatment engagement. Goals: Increase understanding of different treatments for substance use disorders (including medications for opioid use disorder), address concerns about treatment effectiveness and practices, and provide tools to help improve connections to care. Workshop Outline: Review criteria for a substance use disorder and how it is defined. Present statistics about treatment for substance use and mental health disorders, using sources such as the 2022 NSDUH and other surveys. Describe the treatment gap and how it can be addressed by removing barriers to care. Discuss goals of care for people with substance use and mental health challenges. Explain how different medications for opioid use disorder work (methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone). Discuss options for treating stimulant use disorders, including contingency management. Discuss the neurobiology of addiction (e.g. how brain changes impact decision-making). Discuss factors to consider for treatment referrals and resources to connect people with treatment and peer support as well as services for families. Address misperceptions about treatment and how services are evolving to embrace person-centered, trauma-informed care. Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism.
Published: May 13, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
Recording for the National Center for School Mental Health led event Mental Health Literacy: What Is It and Why Is It Important?, originally held on April 9, 2024. Slide presentation
Published: May 10, 2024
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