Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Webinar/Virtual Training
To be effective and efficient, organizations must provide their services in ways that do not inadvertently re-traumatize the teams of workers providing support to their clients. Becoming trauma-informed means adapting practices, policies, physical spaces and more to make services more accessible for everyone, including the workers. This is very important when working on a team, some of whom likely have lived experiences of trauma. This class helps learners conceptualize the nature of this problem and offers practices that reduce the risk of re-traumatization.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Review the impacts of trauma exposure in behavioral health work Consider the mechanisms of re-traumatization in the workplace Assess areas of trauma-informed practice using various assessment tools Examine trauma-informed team competencies   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 2 continuing education (CE) hours certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER: Russ Turner, MA, Director of the People Incorporated Training Institute During Russ’s 16-year tenure, he has written and taught thousands of hours of person-centered curriculum to help people become more effective helpers, communicators, and leaders. His audience includes workers and leaders across a wide range of organizations from human services, healthcare, and libraries, to law enforcement and corrections. He trains trainers, works with management, and has consulted and coached on training projects across multiple sectors of the economy. He has worked as an educator for three decades in a variety of countries and settings including Japan, the Czech Republic, and the UK. His teaching philosophy is that adults learn best when they are challenged, the material is applicable to work situations, and sessions are interactive and engaging.     This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working within schools and school districts and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world while decreasing negative physical, emotional, and psychological outcomes. This webinar will also focus on existing policies within school systems and assess how those policies impact access to equitable and high quality mental and behavioral health care for communities of color. Attendees will walk away with strategies for how to discuss these topic areas with their students and how to support students who are coping with complex cultural issues in developmentally appropriate ways.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define racial stress and trauma and Provide examples of how racial stress and trauma can occur in schools Identify the systems & policies within schools that impact student health and wellness Understanding the role of implicit bias in school systems & policies   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTERS: Nicole L. Cammack, PhD Dr. Nicole L. Cammack is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Media Contributor, and the Founder, President and CEO of Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Howard University and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University. Lastly, she completed a specialized Postdoctoral Fellowship, with the National Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine. Dr. Cammack is passionate about mental health awareness, treatment, and reducing the mental health stigma, particularly as it relates to Black communities. This passion is what led to the development of Black Mental Wellness, Corp an organization of clinical psychologists passionate about shifting the narrative of mental health in the Black community. In addition, she is a co-author of, Healing Racial Stress Workbook for Black Teens: Skills to Help You Manage Emotions, Resist Racism, and Feel Empowered. Her work has been featured in Huffington Post, Essence, People, Thrive Global, Good Housekeeping, Salesforce, and Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature). In addition, she was recognized as a 40 under 40 Honoree with the Leadership Center for Excellence and recognized through her work at Fort Meade and the Department of the Army with an Achievement Medal for Civilian Service. Danielle R. Busby, PhD Dr. Danielle Busby is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Author, Educator, and Co-Founder and Vice President of Professional Relations of Black Mental Wellness Corp. She received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the George Washington University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship, with a child trauma specialization, at Duke University’s Medical Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at Michigan Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Busby is passionate about decreasing barriers to mental health service use for underserved patient populations and is committed to continuously bridging the gap between research and clinical practice. Her research and clinical work are centered on examining barriers to mental health service use, specifically among Black youth who are at an elevated risk for suicide. She has led and contributed to scholarly articles and research on child trauma, youth suicide prevention, racial discrimination among Black youth, and the psychological effects of neighborhood stressors, such as, community violence exposure among Black adolescents. Dr. Busby and her work has been featured in NBC News, People, Women’s Health, Parents, Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature), PsychAlive, and WJLA news. Additionally, she is an awarded recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. She is a proud member of the American Psychological Association’s Leadership Development Institute, SelfSea Digital Wellbeing Advisory Board, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she has served for over 15 years. Dr. Busby was born in Detroit, MI and raised in Southfield, MI. She loves early morning yoga, college football Saturdays, and traveling with her close family and friends.   This event is being held in partnership with Black Mental Wellness.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
 While the NIH has identified sexual and gender minorities as well as racial and ethnic minorities as groups that are facing health disparities, what is often overlooked in research and clinical care are the people living at the nexus of those two communities. Health disparities are a particular type of difference in health in which disadvantaged social groups, such as people from lower social, economic status, racial, ethnic minorities, women, sexual minorities and other groups, have persistently experienced social disadvantage or discrimination and have systematically experienced worse health or greater health risks than more advantaged groups as a result of systems of oppression. An intersectionality framework can have a meaningful impact and potentially better outcomes in behavioral health care. This presentation will offer tools for behavioral health professionals.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe how systems of oppression such as racism and heterosexism create unique health disparities (e.g., addiction and behavioral health care inequities) encountered by LGBTQ+ People of Color. Individuals will also learn ways to increase their cultural humility in working with Queer People of Color.   CONTINUING EDUCATION Participants who fully attend this training or webinar will be eligible to receive 1 hour of continuing education (CE) certified by the Illinois Certification Board (ICB). CE certificates will be managed by the hosting agency and/or ICB.   PRESENTER Dr. David G. Zelaya (he/him/él) is an Assistant Professor at Brown University School of Public Health within the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, he is a research fellow at Harvard Medical School within the Department of Psychiatry, and an affiliated scientist at Yale University with the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. Dr. Zelaya received his Ph.D. from Georgia State University in counseling psychology, he was a psychology resident at Harvard Medical School's Cambridge Hospital, and he completed his fellowship within the Alcohol Research Center on HIV at Brown. His program of research focuses on examining health disparities, from an intersectionality and minority stress lens, among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and sexual and gender minority communities and links to HIV risk, mental health, and substance use. Dr. Zelaya is the PI of an NIH funded K23 career development grant aimed to develop a behavioral health intervention for Latinx queer individuals to decrease hazardous alcohol use by targeting intersectional forms of discrimination. Clinically, he is interested in providing culturally competent behavioral health services to historically underserved communities (e.g., Spanish-speaking Latinx people; sexual and gender diverse people). He has been the recipient of numerous social justice awards, his research has been published in the flagship journals of his field, and he serves on the editorial board for the Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity journal. At Brown, Dr. Zelaya teaches Introduction to Health Disparities.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
***This series is only open to HHS Region 5 Project AWARE grantees. Email Sarah Parker McMinn for the meeting link.***   The Midwest Center for School Mental Health and the Great Lakes MHTTC will be hosting a series of three interactive learning sessions for Project AWARE grantees. The sessions will focus on working towards sustainability of Project AWARE initiatives, with a focus on strategic planning, communication, partnerships and engagement, and organizational capacity. Each session will combine presentation, peer learning, and discussion.      TRAINING SCHEDULE: All sessions will take place virtually from 9:00 AM–10:30 AM CT/10:00 AM–11:30 AM ET. February 22: Sustainability and Strategic Planning March 28: Organizational Capacity and Communications April 25: Partnerships and Engagement (including with youth and parents)     HOW TO ATTEND: HHS Region 5 Project AWARE grantees should email Sarah Parker McMinn ([email protected]) for the Zoom meeting link and registration details.     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the event or training.     PRESENTERS: Mark Sander, PsyD Dr. Sander is a Senior Clinical Psychologist for Hennepin County and the Director of School Mental Health for Hennepin County and the Minneapolis Public Schools. He is a Certified Master Trainer on the Adverse Childhood Experience Study and a Visiting Scholar at Wilder Research. He is also on the Advisory Board for the Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Board Member for the Minnesota Trauma Project. Dr. Sander has published journal articles and book chapters on school mental health and has presented extensively on school mental health and ACEs and developing trauma sensitive schools at local, state and national conferences. He has a private practice is Minnetonka, Minnesota.   Cheryl Holm-Hansen, PhD Dr. Holm-Hansen is a community psychologist who brings 30 years of experience conducting community-based research related to children’s mental health. In addition to serving as the Co-Director of the Midwest Center for School Mental Health, she manages a consulting firm specializing in children’s mental health research and strategic planning.   Her portfolio includes many evaluation and research projects designed to help schools, mental health providers, and local/state governments understand community needs, develop effective services, build stronger systems, and demonstrate impact. Prior to establishing her consulting practice, Dr. Holm-Hansen spent 21 years as a Senior Research Manager at Wilder Research in Saint Paul, Minnesota.     This training is provided with our valued partners from the Midwest Center for School Mental Health.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  Determinants of health are varied and many, encompassing biological, social, structural, environmental, legal, and political determinants. In combination, these determinants bridge downstream and upstream locations; for example, from the clinic office to the school classroom to state-specific legislation. This 90-minute virtual session will cover the many determinants of health, their definitions, related impacts and outcomes, and current interventions, such as social prescribing and CARE courts. We will also discuss the range of competence and importance of advocacy through a trauma-informed lens to advance holistic health for collective benefit.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of the varied and many determinants of health Identify interconnections and impacts among multiple determinants of health Learn current interventions and what is important to help close gaps in care     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.      PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Mental illness and substance use disorders overlap at the rate of 50 to 70%. In any given year, the majority of patients/clients with co-occurring disorders will not seek help directly for co-occurring disorders. Many find themselves seeking services for medical complications at a primary healthcare facility for medical complications caused by or exacerbated by their co-occurring disorders. In this presentation, you will learn how to address co-occurring disorders in an integrated manner in a primary care facility or other behavioral health settings. Topics covered include: Assessing your organizations readiness for integrated co-occurring disorders treatment, essential components of integrated co-occurring disorders treatment, evidence-based strategies for engaging patients/clients in co-occurring disorders treatment, and strategies for helping patients/clients with co-occurring disorders avoid slipping through the cracks.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define co-occurring disorders. Articulate the 10 components of integrated co-occurring disorders treatment. Utilize the components of integrated co-occurring disorders treatment in your work. Access a tool to assess your organizations readiness for integrated co-occurring disorders treatment. Articulate reasons patients/clients with co-occurring disorders slip through the cracks. Help patients/clients with co-occurring disorders avoid slipping through the cracks.   CONTINUING EDUCATION Participants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 1 continuing education (CE) hour certified by Illinois Association of Behavioral Health (IABH). CE certificates will be managed or disseminated by IABH.   PRESENTER Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The webinar will focus on the issues faced in our rural communities from a mental health standpoint. Different tools and programs we are currently using to help educate our rural communities and the farm population will be explored. We will discuss how from a mental health standpoint, when dealing with the rural communities, it must be handled differently than those who live in the suburban or city areas. We will discuss the importance of why we must start the conversation now before it is too late and do our part to help ensure we have a strong viable population to continue agriculture for years to come.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Identify the difference in how you talk to or work with those from rural communities versus non-rural communities. Emphasize the importance of why we must focus on showing the importance of beginning the hard conversations now, especially with a culture of individuals who don’t talk or discuss their issues. Discuss why suicide is an issue along with mental health for our farm communities and identify the stressors that accompany the farming industry. Raise awareness of the need for professionals to understand how those in the farming community work so they can better understand them but be able to make the greatest impact. Explore why we must focus on mental health for our farming and rural communities and how that correlates to the decrease in younger generations being resistant to entering farming as a career.   CERTIFICATES Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTER Adam Tyler, MA, 4-H and Ag & Natural Resources Extension Educator and County Extension Director, Purdue Extension - Fountain County Adam Tyler has been involved in various aspects of agriculture throughout his life. He is currently serving as the County Extension Director, 4-H and Agriculture & Natural Resources Educator in Fountain County Indiana with Purdue University Extension which he has been with since 2019. Prior to coming to Purdue, Adam was a middle and high school agriculture teacher, taught advanced life sciences, and was lead FFA advisor for 7 years. Adam also completed his school administration masters and licensure during this time while teaching. Throughout his life he has had family and friends affected by mental health issues, and when he was in education, he saw firsthand the impact that mental health had on rural communities which led him to gain as much education and understanding of mental health along with taking every opportunity to assist those going through this topic we tend to ignore. Adam became involved with the Purdue Farm Stress Team shortly after joining Purdue Extension, and he is grateful for this opportunity which allows him to help and bring awareness of mental health issues affecting our rural communities and populations.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Application Deadline: April 1, 2024     This virtual certification course trains instructors to teach QPR for Suicide Prevention to their community. Participants first learn about the nature of suicidal communications, what forms these communications take, and how they may be used as the stimulus for a QPR intervention. To gain perspective, participants are introduced to the history of suicide, suicide prevention, and the spectrum of modern-day public health suicide prevention education efforts. Participants then learn to market QPR, target potential Gatekeepers, and how to teach the QPR curriculum.  Participants also learn to deal with pent up audience demands to talk about suicide, survivor issues, and how to make immediate interventions and referrals. Each participant has the opportunity for individual rehearsal and practice through role-plays.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: To understand the nature, range and importance of suicidal communications and their importance in preventing suicide. To review and understand the groups at greatest risk of suicide and why QPR can work for them. To train participants to teach QPR, for Suicide Prevention. To gain a historical perspective about suicide prevention and how QPR fits into national efforts. To acquire specific knowledge about how audiences may respond to the QPR message and how to react in a helpful manner. To learn how to effectively promote suicide prevention in their own communities. To gain the competence and confidence to teach others how to save lives and help prevent suicidal behaviors.     AUDIENCE: This intensive training series is accepting applications from mental and behavioral health professionals working in HHS Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI). Space is limited.     IMPORTANT INFORMATION: The deadline to apply is April 1, 2024. Applicants will be notified about their enrollment status by April 5, 2024. There is NO COST to attend this virtual QPR certification course for those who are accepted into the training via the Great Lakes MHTTC application process (standard fee: $595.00). This is NOT a webinar. All participants are expected to actively participate for the entire course, including being on camera, using a working microphone, and having the ability to work in breakout rooms/small group exercises. Space is limited – please only apply if you work in HHS Region 5 and you can fully commit to attending the entire 6-hour course. The training will take place on May 1, 2024 from 9:00 AM–3:30 PM CT. Additional details will be shared with accepted applicants. Download the QPR Certified Gatekeeper Instructor Course Outline or visit the QPR website to learn more about the course. Remember: There is no cost to attend if you are accepted into the May 1st training through the Great Lakes MHTTC application process.     HOW TO APPLY: Click the “REGISTER” button at the top of the page to complete the application form.     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training. Participants who successfully complete the course will be Gatekeeper Instructor certified for three years through QPR.     PRESENTER: Heidi Pritzl, MSW, LCSW   Heidi Pritzl graduated with her Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from Hawaii Pacific University (HPU) in Honolulu, HI. Twelve years ago, Heidi moved back to St. Germain, Wisconsin with the goal to serve and support her “home” community.  When she returned to Wisconsin she began to work in the field of mental health as a clinical social worker on the inpatient unit at St. Mary’s hospital for Ministry Koller Behavioral Health, which is now Aspirus Koller Behavioral Health. Heidi then transitioned to outpatient mental health in the clinic setting as a Psychotherapist.   Heidi is trained in suicide prevention with the QPR Institute in Seattle, WA, as a Master and Gatekeeper Trainer. Her goal has been to train as many individuals as possible on the warning signs and risk factors of suicide, so they are able to identify when someone needs support to help in the nation’s goal to reduce suicides by 25% by 2025. Recently Heidi has been training college and high school staff to include coaches, in addition to consulting with corporations and universities to implement suicide prevention and mental health support into their businesses.   Heidi is also serving her second term for the NASW Wisconsin Chapter Board as the West Central/North Central/Northeast Branch Representative. She encourages new social workers to enroll in NASW to receive support and continues to work hard to have the same services, supports, and resources to rural Wisconsin as they do in the cities.   Heidi shares, “I know my work will be done when people begin receiving cards, casseroles, and flowers for a recent diagnosis for mental health or after a hospital stay on a psychiatric inpatient unit.”     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working with their students and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world. We will discuss how implicit bias may influence and impact expectations and interactions with youth. Participants will walk away with strategies to discuss these important issues with youth and learn how to support students as they encounter racism and racial trauma.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify the impact of racial stress and trauma. Explore the impact of prejudice, bias, and privilege. Discuss strategies to support students who are impacted by racial stress and trauma   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.    PRESENTERS: Jessica S. Henry, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist in Washington, DC, Maryland, and Georgia. She is the cofounder and vice president of program development and evaluation for the Black Mental Wellness Corp., and founder and CEO of Community Impact: Consultation & Psychological Services—a trauma-informed organization whose mission is to provide trauma-informed services to individuals and organizations affected by traumatic events. Henry is the previous senior director of behavioral health for one of Washington, DC’s largest Federally Qualified Health Centers, clinical director of a level-5 close security male prison and Georgia’s largest youth homeless shelter. Overall, Henry is passionate about the mental health of individuals in Black and under resourced communities and has specialized in increasing access to treatment and providing the highest quality of evidence-based mental health treatment services to underserved youth, families, and adults exposed to traumatic events (e.g., community violence, abuse, neglect). She received her BS from Howard University, MA from Columbia University, and PhD in clinical psychology from The George Washington University. She is from the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. For more information about Henry, please visit BlackMentalWellness.com or ImpactTheCommunity.com. She can also be found on Instagram @BlackMentalWellness or @CommunityImpact_CP. Dana L. Cunningham, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and cofounder and vice president of community outreach and engagement at Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She is also program director at the National Center for School Mental Health in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Cunningham is passionate about increasing access to culturally responsive and antiracist mental health care for underserved youth and uplifting the voices of marginalized populations. Cunningham also authored a children’s book, A Day I’ll Never Forget, to support children who have been impacted by the incarceration of a loved one. Additionally, Cunningham owns a private practice in the greater Washington, DC area, where she resides. Cunningham received a BA in psychology from Spelman College and obtained her MA and PhD in clinical psychology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. To learn more about Cunningham, please visit BlackMentalWellness.com. This training is in partnership with Black Mental Wellness. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Coaching employees means actively developing their skills on the job, while encouraging and training them to solve problems and make their own decisions. This style of leadership fits with a shift in workplace cultures where leaders can no longer simply tell their direct reports what to do and then monitor how they do it. This session describes the difference between coaching and supervising with practical tips for leaders and aspiring leaders to make this shift.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Distinguish differences between coaching and supervising Detail preparation steps for coaching Describe key elements of a coaching session   CONTINUING EDUCATION Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 1 continuing education (CE) hour certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER: Russ Turner, MA, Director of the People Incorporated Training Institute During Russ’s 16-year tenure, he has written and taught thousands of hours of person-centered curriculum to help people become more effective helpers, communicators, and leaders. His audience includes workers and leaders across a wide range of organizations from human services, healthcare, and libraries, to law enforcement and corrections. He trains trainers, works with management, and has consulted and coached on training projects across multiple sectors of the economy. He has worked as an educator for three decades in a variety of countries and settings including Japan, the Czech Republic, and the UK. His teaching philosophy is that adults learn best when they are challenged, the material is applicable to work situations, and sessions are interactive and engaging.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Youth Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) teaches you how to identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental health challenges and substance use disorders (SUDs) in young people. This training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial support to a young person who may be developing a mental health or substance use issue and help connect them to the appropriate care. Attendees will complete a 2-hour self-paced class (pre-work) and then participate in a 4.5-hour instructor-led class using video conferencing via Zoom. Course capacity is limited, so please only register if you are able to fully attend the training.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Participants will learn to: Identify mental health challenges and SUDs in young people Methods for outreach and support for youth Connect youth with appropriate care   CONTINUING EDUCATION Participants who fully atternd this training will be eligible to receive 5 continuing education (CE) hours certified by the Illinois Certification Board (ICB). CE certificates will be managed by ICB.   PRESENTER Natalie Maggiore, Prevention Specialist for IABH, works with the COO/VP of Programs to develop, implement and evaluate the Association’s youth leadership conference - the Cebrin Goodman Teen Institute. Natalie works with the Prevention Program Director to assist CGTI and Operation Snowball Action Teams throughout the year as they create and implement Action Plans to better their schools and communities. Natalie holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and continues to pursue expanding mental health education and awareness through that avenue. She is also a certified instructor for Youth Mental Health First Aid and Teen Mental Health First Aid (tMHFA).   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
La salud física y la salud emocional deben ser tratadas con la misma seriedad y prioridad. En la comunidad latina el estigma hacia la salud mental puede impedir y/o el atrasar la búsqueda de los servicios de salud mental. Durante este taller platicaremos sobre la importancia de cuidar nuestra salud emocional para prevenir condiciones como la depresión y ansiedad. Los/as participantes identificarán los principales estresores psicosociales en la comunidad latina, utilizarán estrategias para el manejo efectivo de las emociones, practicarán técnicas de relajación, y desarrollarán metas para mantener un balance holístico.   OBJECTIVOS DE APRENDIZAJE Definir bienestar emocional y salud mental. Identificar factores culturales que influyen en el proceso de aculturación de las comunidades Latinas. Proveer estrategias para manejar la regulación emocional y prevenir condiciones de salud mental.   AUDIENCIA Esta plática es dirigida a promotores/as de la salud, manejadores/as de caso y consejeros.   PRESENTERS Isa I. Vélez Echevarría, PsyD  Isa Vélez es psicóloga clínica, puertorriqueña. Es la manejadora de proyecto del estado de Ohio para los Great Lakes Addiction, Mental Health, and Prevention Technology Transfer Centers,  administrados por el Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies en la University de Wisconsin-Madison. Durante su internado predoctoral en el Children's Institute de Los Ángeles, CA, obtuvo una certificación como Clínica de Psicoterapia Interpersonal. Se capacitó en Terapia Cognitivo Conductual Centrada en el Trauma y Terapia Familiar. Además, brinda servicios de telesalud a comunidades de color en Massachusetts y Puerto Rico. Su trabajo clínico se ha centrado en servicios culturalmente adaptados e informados sobre el trauma para las comunidades latinas. Alfredo Cerrato-Lanzo Alfredo Cerrato es el Oficial Principal de Desarrollo Cultural y Laboral del Great Lakes Technology Transfer Centers, administrados por el Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies de la Universidad de Wisconsin en Madison. También es capacitador certificado a nivel nacional en Cultura: una parte integral de los servicios de salud mental, Aplicación clínica de elementos culturales en el tratamiento de salud mental para poblaciones hispanas y latinas, por el National Hispanic and Latino Mental Health Technology Transfer Center en Puerto Rico, y un capacitador de la Asociación Nacional de Consejeros de Alcoholismo y Abuso de Drogas (NAADAC, por sus siglas en inglés) en temas culturales. El Sr. Cerrato tiene 25 años de experiencia en relaciones internacionales y se especializa en comunicaciones interculturales, resolución de conflictos y mejora de procesos. Ha llevado a cabo trabajos de defensa, políticas y ayuda en casos de desastre en Irlanda del Norte, Honduras, Perú, Brasil, Japón, Sri Lanka y otros lugares del mundo. Su enfoque principal en Wisconsin ha sido trabajar con comunidades hmong, hispanas, latinas y pueblos indígenas de América del Norte a través de asistencia y capacitación intensiva, desarrollo de currículos y el NIATx, Change Leader Academy. This training is in partnership with: HOLA (Healthy Opportunities for Latin Americans) Great Lakes MHTTC ofrece esta capacitación para personas que trabajan en la Región 5 del HHS: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. Esta capacitación se brinda en respuesta a una necesidad identificada por las partes interesadas de la Región 5.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and communities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy, participants will learn: Key strategies for effective behavioral health advocacy Skills to engage using these key strategies     TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the series.     PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  This series takes place on May 14, 21, 28 and June 4, 2024 from 2:30 PM–4:00 PM CT. You must attend all dates to receive your certificate.   DESCRIPTION: The NIATx Change Leader Academy (CLA) is the web-based version of the popular NIATx Change Leader Academy. The CLA has given thousands of behavioral health organizations the tools to make real changes that improve their systems of care. This interactive, expert-led program includes four weekly 90-minute learning sessions. An optional organizational consultation is available following the four sessions. This training and consultation are offered at no cost and are supported by funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants in the virtual CLA will learn:  The NIATx principles and how they motivate positive change How to build a change team and integrate NIATx principles at the organizational level How to conduct a change project to improve a specific process within their organization     CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will be eligible to receive 6 NAADAC-certified continuing education (CE) hours. CE certificates will be sent to qualified individuals via email within two weeks after the training.       PRESENTER: Mat Roosa, LCSW-R Mat Roosa was a founding member of NIATx and has been a NIATx coach for a wide range of projects. He works as a consultant in the areas of quality improvement, organizational development, and planning, evidence-based practice implementation. His experience includes direct clinical practice in mental health and substance use services, teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and human service agency administration.       The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Registration is now closed. Limited space available. Priority registration will be given to those working in Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI.   Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based collaborative conversational style used to help strengthen an individual's own motivation and commitment to change. In this interactive, skills-based workshop, participants will have the opportunity to learn about and practice the spirit and relational skills of MI.   Note: Participants must complete Motivational Interviewing: Relational Skills (Level 1) to be eligible to attend the subsequent training in the MI series: Motivational Interviewing: Technical Skills (Level 2). Those who fully attend Level 1 will automatically receive an invitation to register to attend Level 2.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After completing Motivational Interviewing: Relational Skills (Level 1), participants will: Have an introductory level understanding of the purpose, benefits, and challenges of MI Understand and practice the four processes used in MI: planning, evoking, focusing, and engaging Recognize differences between helpful client engagement vs. harmful client engagement Prepare to apply the spirit of Motivational Interviewing to patient interactions Observe and practice the core skills of MI: listening, open-ended questions, affirmations, reflections, and summarization.   TRAINING DATES: you must attend all dates listed below in their entirety to receive CEs. May 15, 2024 from 8:30am-11:30am CT/9:30am-12:30pm ET May 22, 2024 from 8:30am-11:30am CT/9:30am-12:30pm ET May 29, 2024 from 8:30am-11:30am CT/9:30am-12:30pm ET   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 9 NAADAC certified continuing education (CE) hours. CE certificates are sent via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the training.   TRAINER: Sue EckMaahs has practiced and trained Motivational Interviewing (MI) for over 30 years.  With a background in Sociology, she has provided MI implementation, training, and coaching services to thousands of professionals and over two hundred organizations, nationally & internationally.  Her audience spans mental health, substance abuse, public health & primary care, education, child protection/family reunification, workforce development, and re-entry/corrections.  On a personal note, she loves hiking with her partner Steve & dog, Cassie!     To ensure all participants get the most out of these interactive virtual trainings, we ask that everyone be prepared to do the following in every session: The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Join us for an engaging panel discussion designed for those with lived experience working as peers and mental health professionals seeking collaborative opportunities! This panel will cover the unique perspective that individuals with lived experiences bring to the peer support role. We'll showcase how these diverse experiences enrich peer support and contribute to the effectiveness of mental health treatment and recovery. This information is particularly pertinent for mental health professionals aiming to integrate and optimize their collaborative efforts with peers in diverse professional settings.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Explain the integral role peers play in mental health services, promoting inclusivity, understanding, and empowerment in the recovery process. Explore the unique perspective that individuals with lived experiences bring to this role, emphasizing how these experiences contribute to effective peer support and recovery. Showcase the various career pathways available for peers, including opportunities within mental health organizations, community settings, and collaborative healthcare environments.   CERTIFICATES Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTERS Danielle Burkett, MSW, LSW, CSPR-PR, CAPRCII, MATS, CHW/CRS, Founder/Executive Director and Peer Recovery Coach, Unlikely Journeys Danielle is a passionate and accomplished professional with a Master of Social Work. Her background includes working in three county jails, work release programs, and alongside a police officer. Since 2017, she has been making a difference as a Peer Recovery Coach. However, her inspiring journey took an unexpected turn in March 2022 when she suffered a stroke. This life-altering event propelled Danielle to found Unlikely Journeys, an organization driven by the belief that time is precious, and fear is merely an illusion.   Mallory Chaffin, BS, Executive Director, Mallory's Mission Mallory, a University of Southern Indiana alumna, holds a BS in Accounting and Professional Services and has over a decade’s worth of experience in various accounting settings, including the nonprofit industry. A proud participant of the Indiana DMHA Leadership Fellows Academy (LFA) 2022-2023 program, she leveraged the experience and startup funding to establish a nonprofit business. As an adoptee and adoptive mother, Mallory's passion lies in providing trauma-informed education to foster and adoptive families. Her nonprofit also extends support to first families, particularly those affected by addiction, in their journey toward reunification with their children. The LFA program played a pivotal role in launching and nurturing her nonprofit initiative.   Yvette Markey, CHW/CRS, Y-MHFA, A-MHFA, MATS, CSPR-PR, CAPRC II-MH, CBTi, CEO/Founder, InTouch Outreach Yvette, is the Founder/CEO of InTouch Outreach (ITOR), a Recovery Community Organization and also works on the Behavioral Health Team, with a local organization providing Peer support services and Recovery Support groups as part of their newly created IOP Program. As a person with lived experiences of trauma, addiction and mental health challenges, Yvette is able to identify things that may be helpful as a person works towards their personal wellness. As a Human Services Professional that serves to connect people in need to people who care, her expertise aligns perfectly for the alignment of joining this panel. Yvette’s passion for helping people to help themselves has led her to some of the roughest streets of Indianapolis, the services she provides reach those in need. In her free time, she enjoys a good book, gardening and spending time with family, and outdoors in the warmer months enjoying nature.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Burnout is a general term that describes the chronic and cumulative effect of different stresses at work and how it negatively impacts the worker’s health and wellbeing. If unaddressed, the various stresses of Human Services work contribute to an erosion of compassion and empathy which reduces a worker’s effectiveness in helping others, rendering the worker ineffective and lacking confidence. This class builds awareness of the signs and stages of Compassion Fatigue and Burnout and offers strategies for cultivating compassion satisfaction for the individual and in team dynamics.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recognize warning signs of burnout and compassion fatigue Review of the “why” of caregiver work Assess current potential for compassion satisfaction Introduce strategies for reducing burnout in an individual and team   CONTINUING EDUCATION Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 2 continuing education (CE) hours certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER Raymond Young, CPS, BA, has 15 years of experience training diverse groups of adult, youth, and adolescent learners prior to joining the Training Institute at People Incorporated Mental Health Services. He has trained mental health workers, police officers, transportation professionals, business partners, and clients. Ray received his certification as a Certified Peer Specialist from the Minnesota Department of Human Services in 2017 and has since worked with individuals with various mental health conditions and behavioral health concerns. He has also studied Drug and Alcohol Counseling. Ray has a passion for working with youth in Youth Leadership Programs and as a mentor in the community.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare providers found themselves abruptly thrust into the world of telehealth services delivery. As agencies, clinicians, and clients increased the use of these new technologies and methods of clinical practice and collaboration, an apparent need for ethical best practices within this modality arose. This presentation will emphasize ethical best practices using technology and telehealth, ethical responses to unique challenges faced by clients and providers using this modality, and ethical concerns unique to using virtual methods in clinical practice.    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this educational activity, learners will be able to: Identify ethical concerns specific to virtual service delivery in their clinical practice.  Identify ethical responses to challenges associated with the use of virtual technologies.  Identify and mitigate limitations in the use of technology and virtual platforms in their work.     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.      PRESENTER:  Dr. Jill D. Stinson is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She received her dual doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Psychology, Policy, and Law from the University of Arizona prior to serving as the Director of Sex Offender Treatment at Fulton State Hospital with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Her teaching focuses on professional ethics, forensic psychology, and psychological assessment, while her research focuses on serious mental illness, personality disorders, self-regulatory problems, and histories of early childhood maltreatment in persons who have committed violent and sexual offenses, as well as issues related to community re-entry, stigma, and suicidality in justice-involved populations. Dr. Stinson has authored three books related to etiology and treatment of sexual offending and motivation to engage in therapy. She is the incoming Editor-in-Chief for Sexual Abuse, Chair of the ETSU Campus IRB, and Secretary of the Board of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology.      The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this webinar will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event.      PRESENTER: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.     The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based collaborative conversational style used to help strengthen an individual's own motivation and commitment to change. In this interactive, skills-based workshop, participants will have the opportunity to learn about and practice the spirit, relational skills, and technical skills of MI.   Note: Participants must complete Motivational Interviewing: Relational Skills (Level 1) to be eligible to attend Motivational Interviewing: Technical Skills (Level 2). Those who fully attend Level 1 will automatically receive an invitation to register to attend Level 2. More info can be found on our MI and SBIRT Training 2024 webpage.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define and summarize the processes of focusing and evoking Identify different strategies for focusing and how to apply them to client interactions Define and recognize change talk, sustain talk, and discordance Differentiate between client cues of readiness, ambivalence, and discordance Construct effective responses to different client cues Design a plan for advancing individual MI skills   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 9 NAADAC certified continuing education (CE) hours. CE certificates are sent via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the training.   TRAINER: Sue EckMaahs has practiced and trained Motivational Interviewing (MI) for over 30 years.  With a background in Sociology, she has provided MI implementation, training, and coaching services to thousands of professionals and over two hundred organizations, nationally & internationally.  Her audience spans mental health, substance abuse, public health & primary care, education, child protection/family reunification, workforce development, and re-entry/corrections.  On a personal note, she loves hiking with her partner Steve & dog, Cassie.     To ensure all participants get the most out of these interactive virtual trainings, we ask that everyone be prepared to do the following in every session: The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  “There is no health without mental health.”  – World Health Organization (WHO)   The notion of integrated care in the field of healthcare has evolved over time. Historically, integrated care referred to the integration of mental health and addictions treatment, which is now called behavioral health. Today, integrated care refers to the integration of behavioral health and physical health.   Integrated care is a best practice for supporting person-centered holistic healthcare due to the use of interprofessional collaboration with a focus on achieving the Quintuple Aim in healthcare. There is an expanding lens of integrated care beyond biomedicine that incorporates co-production of knowledge. This 90-minute virtual session will cover what constitutes integrated care, the shift from fee-for-service to value-based care, the collaborative care model, resource hubs, practice frameworks, and expanding perspectives on this evolving approach to care.       LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Be able to define integrated care within the context of mainstream medicine Learn about the Collaborative Care Model as an integrated care best practice Understand integrated care practice frameworks and expanding care perspectives     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.        PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and commuinities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 3, Action in Advocacy, participants will learn: Components of an advocacy plan Examples of effective advocacy     TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the conclusion of the series.     PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  The United Nations has set forth the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In part, these goals aim to advance “a plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity” and “realize the human rights of all” by centering global efforts on health equity. This 90-minute virtual session will define health equity, identify evidence-based practices supporting health equity, review priority populations affected by health inequities, and explain the far-reaching impact(s) caused by disparities in healthcare. We will also discuss other salient health equity topics including our evolution of understanding, an expanding unit of analysis, trauma-informed care, local-to-global (dis)connections, and policy-practice implications within the context of sustainable, collective futures.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of what health equity is and how it has evolved Identify the impact of health inequity and health disparity Learn policy and practice implications within the context of collective futures     CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.      PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
An Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Enhancing Your Practice and Your Life with Acceptance, Self-Compassion, and Values-Based Action. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is an evidenced-based intervention model grounded in mindfulness, self-compassion, and values-based action. Clients learn to encounter thoughts and feelings in a mindful way, neither dwelling on them nor pushing them away. At the same time, they are encouraged to act on their most deeply held values. In over 1000 randomized controlled trials and nearly 200 meta-analyses and systematic reviews, ACT has been shown to be efficacious for a wide variety of problems helping professionals address, including depression, anxiety, OCD, psychosis, substance abuse, chronic pain, dealing with cancer, stress, and stigma. Rather than going after reducing symptoms, ACT increases psychological flexibility: the capacity to turn to the present moment as a conscious human being and take action according to personally-chosen values. ACT can enhance your practice as professional as well move one, giving you a transdiagnostic evidence-based model from which to stand. But it can also impact your life, giving you a framework for preventing burnout, finding balance, and engaging meaningfully in the world outside of work. In this two-day, highly interactive virtual workshop, professionals of any experience level will be introduced to psychological flexibility both intellectually and experientially. You will learn what it’s like, in practice, to open up to thoughts and feelings without getting entangled in them, identify what truly matters to you, and take meaningful action. Training modalities will include brief lecture, clinical vignettes, clinical demonstrations, mindfulness exercises, experiential exercises, large group discussions, small group discussions, and small-group skills practice. This won’t be your typical slog of slides as you sit for hours with glazed eyes. You’ll get multiple opportunities to watch ACT demonstrations, practice ACT with yourself, and practice ACT skills with others. The workshop is intended to be both professionally and personally meaningful.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define psychological flexibility and identify its six components: acceptance, defusion, present moment awareness, self-as-context, values, and committed action. Identify three strategies for facilitating acceptance and willingness with clients. Identify three strategies for facilitating defusion with clients. Help clients contact the moment-to-moment experience of thoughts, feelings, and sensations without becoming absorbed in them or trying to push them away. Contact a sense of self that is more stable than transient thoughts and feelings and transcends personal narratives about who they are and what they are capable of. Facilitate conversations with clients about personal values and values-based behavior activation.   PARTICIPANT REQUIREMENTS Must have the appropriate technology and work environment to join the Zoom training sessions. Must actively engage during training sessions using both camera and microphone. Space is limited. Please only register if you are able to attend both days of the training, Due to the limited capacity, priority will be given to those working in HHS Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI).   CONTINUING EDUCATION Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 12 continuing education (CE) hours. CE certification will be managed by the co-sponsoring organization, UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work.   PRESENTER Matt Boone, LCSW, is a social worker, psychotherapist, and educator who specializes in translating mental health concepts for the general public. He is the co-author of Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of the book Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work. He is the Associate Director  of the student mental health services of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor in psychiatry. He is an Association of Contextual Behavioral Science peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer and a former consultant for the US Department of Veterans Affairs ACT for Depression training rollout. He regularly facilitates ACT trainings for professionals and the general public. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas with his wife, cats, and guitars, and he loves talking about mental health with people who think psychotherapy and self-help are a bit cringy.   This training is co-sponsored by the UW–Madison Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
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