Implicit Bias: Advanced Workshop Series

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Series Description


Implicit bias is insidious in nature; we all have them. Many of these biases are formed through inaccurate information, such as stereotypes, the patterns established by oppressive systems, and even by internalized oppression. Since implicit biases operate outside our conscious control, they can be harmful yet unrecognized barriers to collective liberation and to our individual wellbeing. 

This interactive workshop will cover concepts and strategies for participants to heal from bias and systemic racism in order to better live our values on an individual and systemic level. We will engage in various forms of mindful and contemplative practices and spend time strategizing to embed them into our lives to support our collective healing. Due to time constraints in this workshop, we will not be covering foundational concepts of DEI in these sessions. We will focus on practices to mitigate bias and to interrupt it in others. Therefore, participants must already have a baseline understanding of implicit bias, systemic oppression, social identities, intersectionality, systemic privilege and marginalization, and equity. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Participants will delve deeper into how implicit bias is formed, how to recognize and redress it in one’s self, and practice talk moves to support them in addressing others’ biases. 
  • Participants will explore how to address microaggressions and strategies to scale up their response in order to establish a culture of belonging for every student, family, and staff. 
  • Participants will have an open frame to explore the culmination of their learning, delve into resources to continue their work in this topic, and examine scenarios to authentically push their theoretical understanding of implicit bias into praxis. 

Dates


All sessions are scheduled from 12:00pm MT/1:00pm CT - 1:00pm MT/2:00pm CT.

March 6

March 7


Trainer


Dr. Rana Razzaque

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Dr. Rana Razzaque’s commitment to improving opportunity, access, and inclusion for all children has driven her educational and professional journey. This commitment has deepened over time due to her own lived experiences and the continuous learning she seeks out on a variety of topics related to equity and inclusion, the persistent disparities for marginalized communities, and the deep need to build understanding and empathy through courageous conversations with people from multiple perspectives. Rana was born in Bangladesh, raised in Maryland, spent her adolescence in Texas, and spent a couple of years in Arizona before moving to Denver in 2011. In the warmer months, you might find Rana hiking with her husband, Rob, and her dog Eeyore. She also loves reading (especially fiction and poetry), trying out new recipes to cook, going to concerts, boxing, and indoor rock climbing (even though she is afraid of heights).  

Rana received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Literature from the University of Texas at Austin and Arizona State University, respectively, and focused her thesis research on the impact of literary influence on colonizing South Asia in the 17th century. In 2017, she earned her Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Denver and focused her dissertation research on how mindfulness influences the culturally responsive practices of educators. Rana has served as Social Emotional Learning Partner in Denver Public Schools, Program Development Coordinator with Sources of Strength, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Specialist at Jeffco Public Schools, and is now the Director of Opportunity, Access, and Inclusion at Englewood Schools in Colorado. Her work intersects culturally responsive and sustaining practices with social-emotional learning and transformative educational leadership. Rana’s mission is to ensure that youth and educators have an intentional focus on honoring diverse cultures and identities, utilizing challenges as opportunities to build resilience, and holistically supporting themselves and others to equitably reach their highest potential.