Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia, Presentation Slides
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Event Description In this engaging and empowering training session, participants will explore effective strategies to build personal resilience and navigate workplace challenges constructively. This session will help attendees recognize and address bullying behaviors while learning strength-based approaches to foster a supportive and positive work environment. Through practical examples, participants will gain insights into promoting inclusivity and respect.  Even if transforming the workplace may not be practical, this training will equip you with the skills and strategies to protect and strengthen yourself in a challenging environment. Join us to enhance your personal resilience, develop constructive responses to bullying, and create a positive impact within your sphere of influence.  Objectives  Build Personal Resilience  Recognize and Address Bullying Behaviors  Promote Inclusivity and Respect as Seen through Effective Leadership Styles  Trainer LaVonne Fox Peltier Dr. LaVonne Fox Peltier serves as a Research Assistant Professor within the Bureau of Evaluation & Research Service, situated in the Department of Education, Health, and Behavioral Studies at the University of North Dakota. A member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa reservation, she remains deeply connected to her roots. Drawing from her extensive background, she has dedicated her expertise to working with children, youth, and young adults facing mental health challenges both in rural and urban areas as well as within mental health facilities.  Dr. Fox Peltier is particularly passionate about developing culturally rooted interventions inspired by Indigenous practices to address mental health issues. In her work, she emphasizes the importance of adopting strength-based approaches, advocating for alternatives to the commonly employed deficit-based practices. She is committed to bridging cultural understanding and mental health care for Indigenous peoples. 
Published: July 17, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Event Description The mental health fields have long been leaders in understanding and raising awareness of the importance of understanding power and privilege. Multiple critiques in the past decade, however, have suggested that an overly simplistic understanding of these constructs can impede personal and professional development in multicultural awareness and, as such, be detrimental to those with whom we work. Thus, in this presentation, nuanced understandings and analyses of power and privilege will be discussed on the basis of advancements in the anti-oppression and antiracism literature.    Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: July 1, 2024
Multimedia
Event Description This program aims to equip behavioral health leaders with the essential skills and knowledge to effectively lead teams and foster healthier organizational cultures. Participants will learn strategic and people-focused leadership methods through “Authentic Connection.” The goal of this training series is to enhance their ability to navigate uncertainty, ambiguity, and conflict while maintaining resilience and composure in a rapidly changing behavioral health landscape.  Participants will learn:   -          Explore strategies for fostering wellness and resilience to develop a healthier work culture within their scope of influence.  -          Acquire practical skills in self-care, compassion, and inclusive strategies to integrate into their professional roles.  -          Learn communication strategies to collaborate with others to develop adaptive strategies to address challenges in diverse teams.    June 27 - Session 1: Healthy Teams: Collaborative Communication   To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording July 11 - Session 2: Healthy Teams: Reflective Supervision  To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording July 18 - Session 3: Healthy Cultures: Managing Systemic Burnout and Stress  To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording August 1 - Session 4: Healthy Cultures: Psychological Safety  Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon!   Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk).   He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University.   His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more.   His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. 
Published: June 27, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Clinical and psychological assessments are crucial diagnostic tools; however, it is the assessor, not the assessment, that diagnoses, and as such our tools are only as good as our understanding of science and theory. We will review important trauma theory and science and its implications for diagnosis; and considerations for taking a trauma-informed approach to psychological and clinical assessment will be discussed.  Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: June 17, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording   Event Description Join us in welcoming Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT, Director of Caring Connections, as she presents a timely and informative overview of the Caring Connections program. Caring Connections: A Hope and Comfort in Grief Program is based in the University of Utah College of Nursing and is a leading community resource for grief and bereavement support.  Caring Connections provides grief care and education for clinicians and students and contributes to the scientific evidence to support best practices. In this one-hour training, participants will also learn about the nuances and impacts of traumatic grief, particularly as it relates to loss by suicide or overdose. Traumatic deaths, such as suicide or death by overdose, are on the increase and have a far-reaching impact on immediate survivors and communities. An estimated 47,000 persons die by suicide in the United States annually. For every death by suicide, 135 persons—family members or friends—are impacted. While almost 42,000 people in the United States died from opioids in 2016, and that number continues to increase.   Unaddressed traumatic grief can negatively impact both individual and community mental health. Recognizing and working with the stigma and trauma attached to these deaths benefits everyone. Grief is highly individualized. This means that each person responds to grief differently according to:   How the family member or friend was lost  The grieving person’s personality  Social norms within the grieving person’s culture and family  Other stressors in the grieving person’s life  The grieving person’s history of coping with other losses  The target audience for this training includes first responders, behavioral health clinicians, social workers, addiction counselors, crisis workers, and those whose work brings them into contact with persons impacted by traumatic death.    Trainer Kathie Supiano, PhD, LCSW, FT 
Published: June 12, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Historically, school psychologists functioned in narrow roles in school districts, and many school districts lacked the mental health services students require.  Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) is based on a public health model of providing services and interventions to students as needed.  This training will discuss the components of a school-based behavioral health model that addresses students’ mental health needs from prevention/promotion to early intervention to intensive services. Learning Objectives: 1.Participants will understand the components of behavioral services in an MTSS model 2.Participants will learn about how universal behavioral health screening occurs in schools 3.Participants will learn about workforce development strategies needed to create an effective mental health workforce 4. Participants will learn how to develop partnerships required to implement comprehensive behavioral health models to schools Trainer Andria Amador, Ed.D, NCSP Andria Amador is the Senior Director of Behavioral Health Services for the Boston Public Schools (BPS).  Andria has dedicated her career to urban school psychology and began her career as a school psychologist before becoming an administrator.  Andria, along with her staff and partners, have developed the Comprehensive Behavioral Health Model (CBHM).  CBHM is a multi-tiered system of supports designed to support the behavioral health needs of students across a continuum of prevention, early-intervention and intensive services.  Implementation of CBHM requires BPS school psychologists to expand their scope of service delivery to include all NASP Domains of Practice.  Andria had the pleasure of serving as the Past President of the Massachusetts School Psychology Association.  She is the Delegate Representative for the Northeast for the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and is also the coordinator of the NASP Supervision Interest Group.
Published: May 30, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Event Description This online webinar offers a focused exploration into implementing Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) within settings necessitating brief, effective interventions (e.g., Integrated Behavioral Health positions). This 60-minute session, split between didactic learning and hands-on practice, is designed for clinicians seeking effective, short-term therapeutic strategies that encourage long-term patient engagement. Learn the fundamentals of FACT, its application in IBH or similar settings for addressing a wide range of issues quickly and effectively, and techniques to boost patient retention and follow-up. Ideal for mental health professionals in fast-paced settings, this webinar will equip you with the skills to make a lasting impact in brief clinical encounters.    This training is in response to questions we received from participants at our April training,  Rural Resilience:  Bridging Mental Health Support for Men in the Heartland  Trainer Andrew Jordan Thayer, PhD, LP 
Published: May 22, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Executive function symptoms are common effects of everyday stress, myriad psychological concerns and, crucially, trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Yet, Criterion E—that ADHD is a diagnosis of exclusion—is often ignored. How can we adequately assess for ADHD given the pervasiveness of trauma? Best practice considerations will be discussed.     Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: May 20, 2024
Multimedia
    Session 1 - March 11 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 2 - March 25 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 3 - April 15 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 4 - April 22 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 5 - May 6 Resources coming soon! Click here to view the recording Session 6 - May 20 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Series Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP, is returning to lead our first Mindful Monday series, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice, for Spring 2024. Join us as we continue to explore and experience different mindfulness practices related to the topics of creativity, rest, and self-care. This series is for anyone who desires to improve their overall well-being, resilience, and mental health.  The practices that are presented in the training are designed for quick and effective implementation both personally and professionally.  For mental and behavioral health practitioners these techniques can be easily incorporate into their practice.  Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” Attendees who have participated in past Mindful Monday series have the following to say about the training: “Incredibly validating experience”, “Love doing this- can we do it indefinitely”, “Thank you for this training. It is hard to recognize we also deserve to be heard, have needs/wants and slow down and breathe for a while.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on March 11th and will run every other week through May 20th, 2024.  Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Trainer Christina Ruggiero Master’s Counselling Psychology  Registered Psychotherapist 
Published: May 20, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Review the increased nutritional needs of pregnancy and lactation. Learn about obstacles to achieving optimal dietary intake during pregnancy and after birth.  Explore the link between worsened mental health and poor or limited dietary intake in mothers and infants. Describe some steps clinicians can take to support people during the perinatal period through the lens of nutrition.    Trainer Nathaniel Johnson, PhD  Dr. Nathaniel Johnson is in his second year as an assistant professor at the University of North Dakota. He received his doctorate only a year and a half ago in Nutrition and Exercise Sciences from NDSU. He has published 14 research papers across a diverse set of journals such as Nutrition and Metabolic Insights, The Journal of Clinical Medicine, and Sensors. He is the founder and organizer of the UND Disability Affinity Network for Employees and is passionate about nutrition, disability, and equity. On a personal note, he loves his family, enjoys sports and competitions of all varieties, and has never met a dog that he doesn’t like.     
Published: May 15, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Event Description This presentation will define and describe adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and review the substantial empirical evidence on their mental and physical health effects. Multiple ways of understanding and assessing for ACEs will be discussed, as will how to identify and address them in clinical practice.    Trainer Melanie Wilcox Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology.  
Published: April 22, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording   Event Description Reducing access to lethal means, such as firearms, can determine whether a person at risk for suicide lives or dies. This session will provide rationale for lethal means safety, recommendations on who and when should receive lethal means safety information, and an introduction to lethal means counseling for Veterans at risk for suicide. In addition, the session will provide information on basic firearm safety and safe storage practices.  Trainers Chad Pitts & Sarah Kemp-Tabbut   Chad Pitts is a Veteran of the U.S. Army with over 10 years of organization and program management experience. He is currently the Program Manager for ND HOPES, a suicide prevention project in Western ND focused on Veterans, LGBTQIA2S+ youth, and rural residents. Chad has previously held positions within the NDUS focused on equity and diversity initiatives for disproportionately affected populations including LGBTQIA2S+ and Veterans. While in the Army Chad served as the Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge for multiple domestic and global missions with the 82nd Airborne Division.   Sarah Kemp Tabbut is the Community Engagement and Partnerships Coordinator at the Fargo VA.  She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 8 years of hands-on and public health experience in mental health and suicide prevention.  Sarah is well-versed in suicide prevention best practices, including safety planning, lethal means safety, and community-based interventions and is a Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) Trainer.  She also partners throughout North Dakota with communities to create and strengthen community coalition efforts for mental health, suicide prevention, and Veteran/Military issues. 
Published: April 17, 2024
Multimedia
To access resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Studies have estimated that it takes approximately 17 years for research to inform practice. Implementation science is the systematic study of methods to improve the translation of research to practice. There are many implementation science studies within youth mental health that have focused on therapist training, dissemination campaigns, and cost-effectiveness of training in particular interventions based on community appropriateness. This training will go over implementation science theories, methods, and frameworks that anyone can use to guide an implementation effort. Practical examples in youth mental health implementation within school-settings will be used to highlight innovative ways people can use implementation science in their own work. Learning Objectives Define implementation science, applied implementation, and implementation research Understand theories, frameworks, and models that comprise implementation research Learn from practical school-based implementation efforts for youth mental health Commit to one action that aligns with implementation science principle Trainers Kelsie Okamura Kelsie Okamura (she/her) is an Implementation Researcher at the Baker Center for Children and Families, a Harvard Medical School affiliate, and a licensed psychologist. Dr. Okamura serves on the training, consultation, and distance learning development teams at PracticeWise, LLC. She received her BA in Psychology with Honors and PhD from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Dr. Okamura completed her predoctoral internship at I Ola Lāhui Rural Hawai‘i Behavioral Health and postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania Center for Mental Health. Dr. Okamura was both a NIMH Child Intervention, Prevention and Services (CHIPS) and Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH) fellow; and has more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. She currently serves as Leader for the ABCT Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group and is a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Advisory Group Member to Implementation Research and Practice. Dr. Okamura is passionate about community-based public-sector service system implementation, particularly (a) knowledge formation, (b) quality improvement initiatives that bridge team-based technology, and (c) financial strategies to improve implementation. She is currently funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (Co-PI, System of Care Expansion Award), and has received funding through the National Institute for General Medical Services, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and American Psychological Foundation. As a fourth-generation daughter of Japanese and Okinawan immigrants to Hawaiʻi, Dr. Okamura has a deep appreciation of understanding diversity, culture, and contexts as they apply to youth mental health implementation. Growing up in a rural town in Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi has afforded her insight into the complexities of socioeconomic and cultural barriers that may impede successful implementation of youth psychosocial interventions.   Summer Pascual Summer Pascual (she/her) is an Implementation Research Assistant at The Baker Center for Children and Families, Implementation Research Division. Summer grew up in California and graduated cum laude from Western Washington University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology in 2021. She was also the 2021 recipient of the WWU Presidential Scholar Award for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences as a testament to her exceptional scholarship and service to the university and community. Her undergraduate clinical research focused on eating disorders, body image, and community-based work with underserved populations. In her time at WWU, Summer also researched race, culture, and prejudice. Her understanding of equity and oppressive systems is at the forefront of all her work, and she carries this with her into her current position. At the Baker Center, Summer has worked on several implementation research projects such as the implementation evaluation of a case management system in a publicly-funded mental health system. In conjunction with her work in the IRD, she also supports various implementation projects in the Quality Care Initiative including MATCH and PCIT Learning Collaboratives. Part of her time is spent providing administrative support to the Baker Center’s internship, practicum student, and postdoc training programs. Her passion for developing, implementing, and improving mental health services for underserved communities drives all of her work.
Published: April 9, 2024
Multimedia
To access resources from this session, click ATTACHMENT link Click here to watch the recording Event Description Overview: The workshop places a special emphasis on combating deficit thinking by encouraging participants to recognize and rectify assumptions, biases, and evaluations in their observations. By adopting a strengths-based approach, educators can contribute to a positive learning environment and promote equity. This workshop aims to empower education professionals with practical tools to enhance their observation skills, particularly in recognizing and addressing deficit thinking. The observation protocol provided will guide participants in unpacking their observations of students, encouraging a deeper understanding and awareness of assumptions before making recommendations to support student learning. Purpose: The purpose of this 90-minute workshop is to equip participants with the knowledge, skills, and strategies to conduct better observations by avoiding deficit thinking and fostering a strengths-based approach. By practicing objective description, participants will learn to recognize and challenge assumptions, leading to more informed and equitable observations. Why Training is Important: Training is crucial for education professionals to refine their observation skills, ensuring that the assessments made are fair, unbiased, and conducive to positive learning outcomes. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive observation protocol, helping them understand the importance of describing behaviors objectively and be mindful of where assumptions may influence interpretation and evaluation of students learning. What Training will Provide Participants: Skillsets: Objective detailing of observable behaviors. Differentiation between description, interpretation, and evaluation. Checking assumptions and biases during the observation process. Analysis of behaviors, considering alternative explanations.   Types of Resources Observation and Analysis Form for systematic recording and reflection. Guidelines for Distinguishing Description, Interpretation, and Evaluation. Practical steps on using the observation protocol effectively.   Learning Objectives: Participants will understand the concept of deficit thinking and how it can show up in learning observations (overt and nuanced ways) Participants will practice distinguishing between objective description, interpretation, and evaluation in their observations Learn One Approach for Implementing Systematic Observation and Analysis Trainer Alyson Kaneshiro, EdD Alyson Kaneshiro, Ed.D, is an educator based in the Bay Area. Currently serving as the Bay Area Regional SEED (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) Facilitator, she also holds the position of Associate Director of Learning Services at Urban School of San Francisco. Additionally, Alyson offers consulting and coaching services through her private practice, Learning Specialist LLC. Her extensive experience includes teaching as an adjunct professor in the Master of Arts Special Education Program at the University of San Francisco, conducting action research in Response to Intervention practices, and working in inclusive education and special education compliance at the Hawai’i Department of Education. With a rich educational background spanning 20 years, Alyson is passionate about designing equitable student support systems that prioritize relationships and compassionate care.
Published: April 5, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon!   Event Description Statistics reveal a concerning trend: a significant number of men who have died by suicide had visited a healthcare provider within 30 days prior to their death. This alarming fact underscores the urgent need for more effective mental health interventions and support systems within rural settings. This session aims to shed light on the critical intersection of masculinity, mental health, and rural life, and explore how everyday places—such as doctors' offices, churches, workplaces, and community gatherings—can become gateways to meaningful conversations and interventions. Key topics will include: Understanding the barriers to mental health support for rural men, including stigma, limited resources, and cultural norms. Strategies for healthcare providers to initiate mental health conversations and recognize warning signs during routine visits. The role of churches and faith-based organizations in providing support and breaking down the stigma associated with mental health issues. Integrating mental health awareness and support into workplaces, especially in industries predominant in rural areas. The importance of Integrated Behavioral Health positions in creating a holistic approach to health care in rural settings. Trainer Andrew Jordan Thayer, PhD, LP
Published: April 3, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Event Description We are excited to welcome back Alison Malmon, Founder and Executive Director of Active Minds, the nation’s premier nonprofit organization supporting mental health awareness and education for young adults, for a training that presents new insights about college mental health in 2024. While many people view the pandemic as something that has come and gone, college campuses across the country, particularly community colleges, are continuing to grapple with the ongoing, and in some cases accelerating, student mental health needs. Recent studies conducted on college campuses found that of the students interviewed, 60% of college students meet the criteria for at least one mental health condition, and 81% of students indicate that their mental health negatively impacted their academic performance in the past four weeks. Alison will present insights gathered from activities Active Minds hosts and coordinates with students on college campuses. These insights don’t necessarily dispute the statistics presented in the last paragraph but instead provide a clear picture of how effective mental health education, advocacy, and awareness are in changing the conversation around mental health, which in turn can positively impact statistics. In addition to the data Active Minds has collected, Alison will share some of the most innovative and effective approaches that Active Minds chapters use to support young adult well-being, particularly on college campuses. This training is for anyone who works with young adults and college-age youth. Trainer Alison Malmon Active Minds Founder & Executive Director
Published: March 28, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This training is designed to help leaders prevent and address burnout in the Mountain Plains behavioral health workforce. Participants will learn about holistic integration of their physical, mental, and spiritual well-being to help improve engagement and presence in their leadership. By providing a space for facilitated group learning, reflection, and support, the goal is to identify opportunities for self-management and personal development and improve performance outcomes. After this training, participants will learn the following, Describe how attention to holistic wellness can reduce Behavioral health workforce burnout and impact on the lives of their communities. Learn ways to apply resilience and compassion as a part of their leadership style to nurture, promote, and cultivate healthier work environments. Develop increased self-awareness to recognize how strengths, aptitudes, and potential areas of growth can impact day-to-day functioning and work outcomes Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 26, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This presentation will provide an overview of the Structural Competencies model, which was first articulated in the medical education literature and more recently has been proposed for a more culturally and structurally responsive approach of mental health. The five principles of structural competencies will be discussed, and examples provided of how the structural competencies approach differs from the multicultural competencies approach. Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology.
Published: March 25, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This training focuses on building collaboration and cultivating a culture of inclusivity where everyone feels valued and heard. By learning how to invest in meaningful relationships, participants will work to create a positive and sustainable impact on their workplace environment. The hope is that they will learn ways to identify common goals and interests and empower all members to be a part of the change-making process. Learning Objectives: - Identify opportunities for collaboration and person-centered engagement. - Develop openness towards different perspectives to create a culture of shared decision making. - Enhance communication to reduce misunderstanding and achieve identified goals. Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 21, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or ADHD often experience areas of significant executive dysfunction, which can adversely impact their educational performance. In order for these students to meet with more success in school, they will likely require evidence-based intervention, specific to their areas of executive dysfunction, to be implemented. This presentation will help participants to gain a broad understanding of what executive functions are, and how areas of executive dysfunction can negatively impact a student in school if interventions are not in place to assist them. It will take a deeper look at the areas of executive dysfunction commonly associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD, and finally, it will discuss best practices (evidence-based interventions) to assist with the specific areas of executive dysfunction often found in students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD. After attending this session, participants will be able to: 1. Obtain a general understanding of what executive functions (EFs) are. 2. Be able to identify specific areas of executive dysfunction commonly associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD, and understand how they may adversely impact a student’s educational performance. 3. Gain an understanding of best practices (evidence-based interventions) to implement to assist students with Autism Spectrum Disorder or ADHD, specific to their areas of executive dysfunction. Trainer Amanda Garrett, Psy.D., NCSP Dr. Amanda Garrett is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist who has practiced School Psychology for the Department of Education (DOE) for over 16 years across New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Hawaiʻi. After earning her Ed.S. in School Psychology at Rider University (NJ), she continued on to obtain her doctorate in School Psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PA). Dr. Garrett’s doctoral program had an emphasis in School Neuropsychology, which became an area of passion for her. In addition to working for the DOE, Dr. Garrett spent three years as the Southeast Delegate on the executive board of the Association of School Psychologists of Pennsylvania (ASPP), and she is currently in her sixth year as an executive board member of the Hawaiʻi Association of School Psychologists (HASP), where she has served multiple positions, including Past President.
Published: March 21, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHEMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description In this presentation, we will explore the dual nature of diagnoses as both helpful tools in healthcare and limiting labels that can impact self-perception and societal perception. We will examine the limitations of defining oneself or someone solely by a diagnosis and emphasize the importance of embracing a multifaceted identity. By recognizing the complexity and diversity of individuals' experiences, strengths, and aspirations, the goal is to empower individuals to advocate for themselves and others in matters related to mental health and well-being. Ultimately, we want to promote a broader understanding of identity that goes beyond labels and diagnoses, fostering a more inclusive and supportive environment for all. Trainer LaVonne Fox Peltier Dr. LaVonne Fox Peltier serves as a Research Assistant Professor within the Bureau of Evaluation & Research Service, situated in the Department of Education, Health, and Behavioral Studies at the University of North Dakota. A member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa reservation, she remains deeply connected to her roots. Drawing from her extensive background, she has dedicated her expertise to working with children, youth, and young adults facing mental health challenges both in rural and urban areas as well as within mental health facilities. Dr. Fox Peltier is particularly passionate about developing culturally rooted interventions inspired by Indigenous practices to address mental health issues. In her work, she emphasizes the importance of adopting strength-based approaches, advocating for alternatives to the commonly employed deficit-based practices. She is committed to bridging cultural understanding and mental health care for Indigenous peoples.
Published: March 14, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This workshop will focus on learning how to demonstrate awareness of diversity, equity, and inclusion in service provision through strategies such as cultural humility. Participants will learn to acknowledge and improve responsiveness about decisions, actions, and policies that are shaped by their personal cultural perspective. The goal is for participants to develop an orientation and active engagement towards transitioning to more open and understanding healing environments while improving client engagement. Learning Objectives: Learn ways to validate the experience of others while identifying your own “blind spots” to increase empathy for those we serve. Acknowledge the need for cultural awareness and understanding, through self-reflection to create change and more supportive healing environments. Develop the ability to reframe interactions with others as one of collaborative equals. Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 12, 2024
Multimedia
March 6 (Session 1) To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording March 7 (Session 2) To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Series Description Implicit bias is insidious in nature; we all have them. Many of these biases are formed through inaccurate information, such as stereotypes, the patterns established by oppressive systems, and even by internalized oppression. Since implicit biases operate outside our conscious control, they can be harmful yet unrecognized barriers to collective liberation and to our individual wellbeing. This interactive workshop will cover concepts and strategies for participants to heal from bias and systemic racism in order to better live our values on an individual and systemic level. We will engage in various forms of mindful and contemplative practices and spend time strategizing to embed them into our lives to support our collective healing. Due to time constraints in this workshop, we will not be covering foundational concepts of DEI in these sessions. We will focus on practices to mitigate bias and to interrupt it in others. Therefore, participants must already have a baseline understanding of implicit bias, systemic oppression, social identities, intersectionality, systemic privilege and marginalization, and equity. Learning Objectives: Participants will delve deeper into how implicit bias is formed, how to recognize and redress it in one’s self, and practice talk moves to support them in addressing others’ biases. Participants will explore how to address microaggressions and strategies to scale up their response in order to establish a culture of belonging for every student, family, and staff. Participants will have an open frame to explore the culmination of their learning, delve into resources to continue their work in this topic, and examine scenarios to authentically push their theoretical understanding of implicit bias into praxis. Trainer Dr. Rana Razzaque Dr. Rana Razzaque’s commitment to improving opportunity, access, and inclusion for all children has driven her educational and professional journey. This commitment has deepened over time due to her own lived experiences and the continuous learning she seeks out on a variety of topics related to equity and inclusion, the persistent disparities for marginalized communities, and the deep need to build understanding and empathy through courageous conversations with people from multiple perspectives. Rana was born in Bangladesh, raised in Maryland, spent her adolescence in Texas, and spent a couple of years in Arizona before moving to Denver in 2011. In the warmer months, you might find Rana hiking with her husband, Rob, and her dog Eeyore. She also loves reading (especially fiction and poetry), trying out new recipes to cook, going to concerts, boxing, and indoor rock climbing (even though she is afraid of heights). Rana received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Literature from the University of Texas at Austin and Arizona State University, respectively, and focused her thesis research on the impact of literary influence on colonizing South Asia in the 17th century. In 2017, she earned her Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Denver and focused her dissertation research on how mindfulness influences the culturally responsive practices of educators. Rana has served as Social Emotional Learning Partner in Denver Public Schools, Program Development Coordinator with Sources of Strength, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Specialist at Jeffco Public Schools, and is now the Director of Opportunity, Access, and Inclusion at Englewood Schools in Colorado. Her work intersects culturally responsive and sustaining practices with social-emotional learning and transformative educational leadership. Rana’s mission is to ensure that youth and educators have an intentional focus on honoring diverse cultures and identities, utilizing challenges as opportunities to build resilience, and holistically supporting themselves and others to equitably reach their highest potential.
Published: March 6, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT link Click here to watch the recording Event Description This didactic lecture will review the conceptual basis and empiric evidence linking firearm access to suicide risk and provide clinicians with basic knowledge, language, and strategies to facilitate secure firearm storage solutions among patients identified as having elevated suicide risk. Trainer Joe Simonetti Joe Simonetti is a clinician investigator with the VA Rocky Mountain MIRECC for Suicide Prevention and Director of Mentorship and Education for the Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative at the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine. His research focuses on developing patient-centered firearm injury prevention interventions for individuals at risk of suicide. As an educator, he works locally and nationally to support VA and community-based clinicians in delivering evidence-based and culturally informed counseling interventions.
Published: March 5, 2024
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