Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This 2-hour webinar will focus on enhancing participants’ ability to improve an individual's motivation and engagement in treatment. Participants will learn ways to empower their clients to change by drawing out their meaning, importance, and capacity for change. The hope is that through these methods, participants will gain tools and knowledge to help motivate their clients to improve their health and wellness, live self-directed lives, and strive to reach their full potential. Offered in collaboration with Lewis Family Consulting. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Motivation in Recovery slides Word Clouds generated by webinar participants   FACILITATOR Lamarr Lewis, MA, LAPC, CPRP Lamarr Lewis is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert and trainer for such organizations as; Boeing, Fulton County Probate Court, Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Region IV Public Health Training Center, the Ruby Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, and more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it. Visit the Lewis Family Consulting website here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: April 17, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Leading, managing and supervising in the behavioral health field can be demanding work, requiring attention, organizational skills, quick thinking and creative problem solving. With all of these demands, it can be difficult to remain stable and flexible, while navigating interpersonal relationships, in and out of work. Individuals can often feel discouraged and frustrated, which can affect desired outcomes and add another layer of personal stress. Leading and advocating for change is intense work. All too often, an individual's mental health and wellness will take a back seat, and over time, burnout can occur. In this training a broader picture is revealed as we examine personal responses to life through a Polyvagal lens. With a collection of fresh ideas, plus a bit of tender encouragement, participants can discover new nervous system awareness, resilience and some much needed soul-nurturing to inspire confidence for the challenges of leadership and advocacy. Learning Objectives Understand the foundations of polyvagal theory Self-identify personal nervous system states through a polyvagal lens Cultivate broader awareness and connection with self and others Gain increased skill and confidence for effective leadership and advocacy ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides FACILITATORS Rebekah Demirel, L.Ac MPCC Rebekah Demirel L.Ac. MPCC, is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs, with more than a decade as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years as a paramedic trainer, eighteen years of mental health counseling experience, specializing in traumatic stress, and she is a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: April 16, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third issue of our April newsletter introduces our new webinar series on sexual health, spotlights upcoming Northwest MHTTC events, and disseminates other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: April 15, 2024
Print Media
Northwest MHTTC is proud to present its Year 5 Annual Report Summary, which captures a brief snapshot of the Center's reach from September 2022 - September 2023. This includes the main "core" grant as well as a continued School Mental Health supplement. Every year Northwest MHTTC provides training and technical assistance to the behavioral health workforce in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. In Year 5 of our operations, we reached over 14,000 people through 150 free trainings, webinars, implementations, and other events. The result? Almost 97% of participants would recommend our trainings! Here's just some of what you'll discover in our Annual Report Summary: Core Grant Activities Learn about our work in Evidence-Based Practices for Psychosis, Intensive Training and Technical Assistance, and Responding to Regional Needs & Fostering Diverse Alliances School Mental Health Supplement Activities Discover our work in Building Systems to Support the Mental Health and Well-Being of Educators, our Alaska Workshops, and Trainings. Here are other reports concerning the Northwest MHTTC's recent work: Northwest MHTTC Year 5 Summary Northwest MHTTC School Mental Health Year 1-5 Supplement Summary  
Published: April 10, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our April newsletter spotlights Black Maternal Health week, Northwest MHTTC events, and other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: April 8, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The first April issue of the Northwest MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events with NAMI Seattle, Tenant Law Center, and Rebekah Demirel; provides resources for April observances; and other events and resources of interest.
Published: April 1, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This webinar will highlight key points from the “Supervising Clinical Mental Health Providers” guide published by the University of Washington’s CoLab for Community & Behavioral Health Policy and informed by both the research literature and experiences of community providers, behavioral health leaders, and systems partners. Quality supervision is paramount to quality mental health care. Clinical supervision for behavioral health providers has three primary aims: to develop competent clinicians, to support clinicians in their own experience of the work, and to promote safe and effective therapy, thereby ensuring client welfare. Clinical supervisors are ethically responsible for evaluating and ensuring clinicians are competent and do not pose risk of harm to the clients they are serving. This webinar and the referenced guide lead from the perspective that regardless of one’s supervision style or approach, all aspects of competent and ethical supervision are inherently trauma informed, intersectional, culturally responsive, and rooted in equity. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides Guide: “Supervising Clinical Mental Health Providers” Behavioral health needs of youth in WA state Black women talk about stereotypical transference enactments in cross-cultural supervision FACILITATORS Minu Ranna-Stewart, LICSW Minu Ranna-Stewart, LICSW has provided leadership and clinical oversight in multiple settings including an educational service district, accredited child advocacy center, community sexual assault program, and crime victim service center. She has provided training to mental health providers across Washington State on evidence based mental health treatment models for children and adults, participated in clinical research projects, delivered trauma and trauma informed trainings to the community, and provided direct clinical therapy services to children and adults. Minu is the co-founder of Milestone Behavioral Health Consulting where she proudly provide consultation to programs and organizations and direct services in the form of therapy services to children, adults, and families with a keen interest in treating race-based traumatic stress and ensuring race and identity are included as essential and necessary aspects of prevention, intervention, and therapeutic services. She is a certified TF-CBT therapist and supervisor. Naomi Leong, LMHC Naomi Leong, LMHC, is a registered yoga instructor, licensed Yoga Calm instructor, and a Certified Member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). Naomi also holds certifications in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sports and Fitness Psychology, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, and is a Child Mental Health Specialist. Naomi has a long history working in community mental health and is in private practice at Browne's Addition Wellness Center in Spokane, WA. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: April 1, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The final issue of the Northwest MHTTC March newsletter features new NW MHTTC webinars, a news update about our website, other events and resources.
Published: March 25, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Sometimes mental health conditions can make maintaining a tenancy difficult. Things can get even more complicated when a housing voucher is involved and an incident results in the tenant facing the loss of not only their housing, but also the subsidy they rely on to help keep a roof over their head. This presentation will talk about the challenges many tenants face when balancing their mental health and a housing voucher, as well as an overview of what tools a tenant and their provider can use to help maintain housing stability. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides HUD fact sheet, mental health Other Resources Washington State: Fair Housing Center of WA Human Rights Commission Overview of types of subsidies Northwest Hoarding Coalition Washington Law Help Washington Low Income Housing Alliance - want to get involved with WLIHA? Please email [email protected] King County Tenant Resource Line, open M-F (except holidays) from 9 AM to 1 PM: (206) 580-0762 Solid Ground classes: Webinars for tenants For any other questions, or to get in touch with the Tenant Law Center: Kacey Burton: [email protected] Elizabeth Powell: [email protected] FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation. Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: March 21, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third issue of our Northwest MHTTC newsletter features webinars on mental health topics such as clinical supervision, leadership, and service animals. It also highlights a call for presentations for the Re-Imagining Behavioral Health: Race, Equity & Social Justice Conference.
Published: March 18, 2024
Multimedia
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more and register for upcoming events in the series here. Becoming - The Journey of a Change Agent  Description: In part II of the series, participants will describe the value of belonging in their own self-awareness journey to creating transformative educational systems. What role will they play in the work of creating belonging for every learner? How will they create spaces in their roles to disrupt disproportionate outcomes for students and improve school climate? Ultimately, how can we create and support change agents in education? Objective: This session will offer strategies and considerations for ensuring newly recruited and current staff have empowerment to shift their climates.   About the Presenter: Nikole Y. Hollins-Sims, Ed.D. Technical Assistance Coordinator for the Midwest PBIS Network Nikole Y. Hollins-Sims, Ed.D.,is the senior educational consultant & strategist for Hollins-Sims Consultation. She formerly served as a technical assistance coordinator for the Midwest PBIS network and is a former Special Assistant to the Secretary of Education at the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). Dr. Hollins-Sims has been awarded as a Moral and Courageous Leader for Education by Cabrini University in 2021, the 2021 American Psychology Association (APA) Anti-Racism School Psychology Emerging Professional Award and was named the 2021 Pennsylvania School Psychologist of the Year. One of her career highlights is serving as the lead author of the book titled: Creating Equitable Practices in PBIS.     Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: March 12, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our Northwest MHTTC March newsletter highlights the 2024 Integrated Care Conference, our new podcast episode, and other events and resources of interest. View the new issue.
Published: March 11, 2024
Multimedia
​VIEW WEBINAR RECORDING ABOUT THIS RESOURCE White Trauma: Creating space for white people’s vulnerability with the hopes of undoing the perpetuation of structural/systemic racism. Racism, at its most basic level, is a lens though which people interpret, naturalize, and reproduce inequality. We all struggle to truly see one another due to the conditioning and trauma that has been imposed upon us, which becomes the breeding ground for implicit bias and racial disconnection. This is one of the factors that makes it so difficult for us, as mental health professionals, to have real conversations about things that matter; things that heal. Racism is not a “white” issue it is a systematic/structural issue designed to keep in place white cultural dominance. This system has caused harm to us all.  All of us have biases and they go where we go--in our homes, workspace, schools, community etc. It is critical for space to be created for white people to be able to acknowledge and address their own trauma, without shame or guilt, so true racial healing and mental health healing can begin. If the trauma in white bodies is not healed, then it will be passed on to the next generation and continue the cycle. What is in us will come out, unintentionally or intentionally, because The Body Keeps the Score. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  White Trauma Slides Race Baiting 101 Video White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo,PhD Project Implicit - IAT Implicit Association Tests Fire in the Ashes by Jonathan Kozol The Pain We Carry - Healing from Complex PTSD for People of Color by Natalie Y. Gutiérrez, LMFT Caste by Isabel Wilkerson A Space for Us - A Guide for Leading Black, Indigenous, and People of Color Affinity Groups by Michelle Cassandra Johnson Why People of Color Need Spaces Without White People by Kelsey Blackwell   FACILITATOR Sherronda Jamerson, MA, SUDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: March 5, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The first issue of our Northwest MHTTC March 2024 newsletter features Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month and National Social Work Month, upcoming Northwest MHTTC webinars, and spotlights other events and resources of interest. View here
Published: March 4, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third issue of our Northwest MHTTC December newsletter highlights our two new podcast episodes, upcoming ATTC & MHTTC events, and resources related to behavioral health, professional development, and wellness. The events include training sessions on cultural humility, healthy aging, and professional boundaries. The resources offered include SAMHSA programs for rural EMS training, integrated models for behavioral health and primary care, toolkits for behavioral health resources, and an SPRC self-paced course for suicide prevention data capacity.
Published: December 18, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The second December issue of our newsletter features ways to find support during the holiday season, ATTC & MTTC network events, other events of interest, and resources including SAMHSA Notice of Funding Opportunities.
Published: December 11, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The December issue of our newsletter spotlights the observances National Impaired Driving Prevention Month and International Day of Persons with Disabilities, features ATTC & PTTC network events, other events of interest, and resources including news from the UW School of Social Work about MSW applications.
Published: December 4, 2023
Print Media
  ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This two-page document presents a summary of the Northwest MHTTC's accomplishments during our fifth year of operations, 2022 - 2023. Highlights include: Quantifying our reach through tallies of events offered, people trained, products created, and more The Mental Health Institute for Washington State Providers  Spotlight on Idaho ACT Start Up Crisis workforce support efforts in Year 5   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Here is information on other reports from the Northwest MHTTC: Northwest MHTTC summaries of annual activities   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 4, 2023
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE We welcome back Dr. Kira Mauseth to hear what it means to be part of a healthy team and how we can improve the workplace without doing 'more', even under high-stress conditions. GUEST Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who sees patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates in Everett and Edmonds, WA, is a Teaching Professor at Seattle University and formerly served as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health throughout the COVID response. She also owns Astrum Health LLC, and consults with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities. Dr. Mauseth has provided training to community groups and professionals both regionally and abroad as the co-developer of the Health Support Team© program. Her work and research focus on disaster behavioral health, resilience, and recovery from trauma as well as small and large-scale critical incident response and preparation for organizations. She has worked abroad extensively with disaster survivors and refugees in Haiti, Jordan and Poland, and has trained first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States, and currently serves in the adult mental health clinical seat on Washington State’s Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC).   HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording, slides, & resources: "Healthy Teams: Dynamics and Tactics for Successful Working Groups" PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: November 29, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The fourth November issue of our newsletter spotlights MHTTC Network resources for coping with war and mass violence, TTC network events, and other resources of interest.
Published: November 27, 2023
Multimedia
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more and register for upcoming events in the series here. School Mental Health through a Multi-tiered System Framework Description: This session will provide participants with an overview of the Interconnected Systems Framework and how it supports the implementation of School Mental Health. Objective: Participants will develop an understanding of the Interconnected Systems Framework and the importance of a single system of delivery.   Presentation Materials   About the Presenter: Clynita Grafenreed, Ph.D. Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator at the Northwest MHTTC/ UW SMART Center Clynita Grafenreed, Ph.D., is a Licensed Psychologist (LP) and a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP). She earned her Bachelor of Science in Psychology (1993) and Ph.D. in Psychology (1998) from Texas A&M University in College Station. While she is a LP, Clynita considers herself first as an educator, having spent 24 years in education as a School Psychologist. For 12 years, Clynita worked as a LSSP in several Houston area school districts and then 12 years as an Education Specialist at Region 4 Education Service Center (Region 4) in the Department of Special Education Solutions. While at Region 4, the largest Education Service Center in Texas, Clynita led the Texas Behavior Support Network, a Texas Education Agency sponsored statewide network designed to build capacity in Texas schools through the provision of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) to all students for ten years. Clynita has expertise in the areas of equity, school discipline, mental health, and behavioral supports and interventions.     Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: November 23, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The third November issue of our newsletter spotlights Native American Heritage Day, MHTTC & PTTC network events, and other resources of interest.
Published: November 20, 2023
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Join us for a panel of speakers from WA SPEAKS (Statewide Peer Engagement and Advocacy Keynote Speakers) who will share their lived experiences traversing or navigating systems of care for mental health and recovery. By sharing these journeys by using person-first, recovery-centered, and strengths-based language we aim to shatter stigma. The panelists will also take questions from the audience.   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES HCA Office of Recovery Partnerships WA SPEAKS-Portraits of Hope and Wellness in Recovery YouTube playlist   FACILITATORS Karen Kelly Karen Kelly is the Washington State Community Connectors Project Director.   Garrett Leonard   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: November 17, 2023
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE The Social Development Research Group’s (SDRG) Northwest Center for Family Support (NCFS) was established to build capacity and increase access to family-focused evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for families impacted by opioid use disorder (OUD) in the state of Washington.  Learn about how NCFS is working to increase statewide capacity to deliver EBIs that braid recovery and treatment support for caregivers with OUD and prevention for their children, ages 0-14.  Learning objectives:  Review potential adverse outcomes for children living with a caregiver with OUD  Understand the EBIs supported by NCFS and how they can mitigate potential adverse outcomes for children and support caregiver recovery  Understand NCFS’s approach to expanding access to family-focused EBIs  Gain a deeper understanding of UW’s Social Development Research Group’s 45+ years of leadership in prevention science    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides NCFS Fact Sheet Word cloud responses: How is everyone doing today? & What comes to mind when you hear the word prevention?   FACILITATORS Margaret Kuklinski, PhD Margaret Kuklinski, PhD, is Director of the Social Development Research Group (SDRG), Acting Director of the Center for Communities That Care, and Endowed Associate Professor of Prevention in Social Work in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington. At SDRG and the Center for CTC, she oversees multidisciplinary staff dedicated to promoting healthy development and preventing substance misuse and other problem behaviors in young people through rigorous prevention science and dissemination of effective preventive interventions. Her own NIH- and foundation-funded research focuses on demonstrating the long-term impact of effective community-based and family-focused substance use prevention interventions; partnering with communities, agencies, and services systems to implement and scale them; and building policy support for preventive interventions by demonstrating their benefits and costs.  She is the Principal Investigator of a Foundation for Opioid Response Efforts grant that established the Northwest Center for Family Support to increase access to family-focused evidence-based interventions for families impacted by opioid use disorder.  Under NIDA’s HEAL Prevention Initiative she co-chairs the Health Economics Working Group, which is examining the cost-effectiveness of a set of projects aimed at developing effective approaches to preventing opioid misuse in adolescents and young adults.  Dr. Kuklinski is a member of the Board on Children Youth and Families at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. She previously served on the board of the Society for Prevention Research. As a health economist, she has helped set methodological standards for cost, benefit-cost, and cost-effectiveness analyses of preventive interventions for children, youth, and families through efforts led by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the Society for Prevention Research. Dr. Kuklinski received a PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, and an AB in Economics from Harvard University.    Jim Leighty, MSW, LICSW Jim Leighty, MSW, LICSW, is the Project Director for the Northwest Center for Family Support (NCFS) within the Social Development Research Group (SDRG) at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work.  NCFS was created, via a grant from the Foundation for Opioid Response Efforts, to build capacity and increase access to family-focused evidence-based intervention for families impacted by opioid use disorder.   Prior to joining SDRG, he worked in and managed various multidisciplinary community mental health programs working with adults with serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders in two assertive community treatment programs and adolescents in inpatient and juvenile justice settings.  Before joining the social work world, Jim served 20 years in the US Marine Corps.  Jim received his MSW from the University of Washington, an MS in Management (Finance) from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a BA in Economics & Political Science from the University of Rochester.    Ashton Gatsby, BA Ashton Gatsby is the Project Coordinator for the Northwest Center for Family Support. Their focus is on increasing data driven engagement and outreach. In addition, they work as a Research Coordinator for SDRG's Survey Research Division.      Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: November 17, 2023
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