Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
Despite having multiple new medications every year for the treatment of depression, schizophrenia, and mood disorders, the outcomes have not improved as expected. We have moved from a psychodynamic-oriented framework to a biological one, but are still not having the desired outcome. Medication non-adherence and treatment resistance remain big issues daily. It is well known that people with a trauma history have more tendency to be non-adherence to treatment. Taking into consideration the psychodynamic and psychosocial aspects at the time of prescribing can play a significant factor to improve the treatment outcome.   View a recording of this 3/8/2023 session by Raul Condemarin, MD. here.
Published: March 9, 2023
Multimedia
Treatment planning is important for mental health care as it provides a guide to how services may best be delivered. It serves as an outline of the therapeutic interventions, what is going to be done, when it is going to be done and by whom while considering the client’s needs. In this training you will learn: How to conduct an effective treatment planning meeting Develop SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time specific) goals Understand how to use the information from the assessments to help guide treatment goals Learn more about Implementing Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) in Kansas.  
Published: October 6, 2022
Print Media
September 2, 2022 Providing diagnostic feedback and psychoeducation to Y-EP and families is important and can be beneficial to both young people and their families. When provided thoughtfully, with attention to the youth and family’s culture and experience, feedback can help youth and families to better understand their experiences, and to reduce misconceptions, worry, and shame about symptoms. Feedback can help the youth to begin learning and practicing effective coping skills and strategies. (Note- for more information on what is meant by CHR and early psychosis, see our previous clinical brief, titled, “Screening for Psychosis”).
Published: September 2, 2022
Multimedia
August 9, 2022 There is growing evidence that exercise has numerous benefits beyond improving physical health, including enhancing cognitive functioning and well-being, and increasing resiliency in response to stress. This presentation will review research on the mental health benefits of exercise. Practical tips for integrating more exercise into one’s personal lifestyle will be provided. Couch potatoes are encouraged to attend!   To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/Cl7Gzm_JK4Q   Presenter(s):  Kim T. Mueser, PhD is Professor of Occupational Therapy, Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Psychiatry, and researcher at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. His research interests are on the development and evaluation of psychosocial interventions for persons with major mental illnesses. His work has involved a range of different interventions, including cognitive behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in a range of populations, teaching illness self-management, family psychoeducation, cognitive remediation, comprehensive treatment of first episode psychosis, integrated treatment for co-occurring substance use disorders, and supported employment,. He has published over 400 publications in peer reviewed journals, and co-authored over ten books and 100 book chapters. His research has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation. In 2017 he was given the Michael S. Neale Award by Division 18 (Psychologists in Public Service) of the American Psychological Association.    Susan R. McGurk, PhD is clinical and neuropsychologist, Professor of Occupational Therapy, and Psychological and Brain Sciences, and researcher at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University. Her research interests focus on the treatment and rehabilitation of persons with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses. She has published over 100 publications in peer reviewed journals. Her research has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research, and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation. She was given the Gerard E. Hogarty Excellence in Schizophrenia Award, University of Pittsburgh, and the Rehabilitation Practitioner of Distinction Award, National Rehabilitation Association.   
Published: August 9, 2022
Multimedia
June 2, 2022 Coordinated specialty care for early psychosis is an evidence-based treatment model aimed at fostering resilience and recovery for individuals who have experience a first episode of psychosis or are at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. Each webinar will be co-presented by a professional with expertise in that component of care, as well as an individual with lived experience who can speak to how this aspect of care was meaningful in their journey towards recovery. This series is geared toward any individuals that are new to working on an Early Psychosis Specialty Team – including students, clinicians, prescribers, supported employment specialists, family clinicians, and peer specialists.   to watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/eNQLYlIHT2o
Published: June 2, 2022
Multimedia
/*-->*/ /*--> There is limited research addressing the needs of gender-expansive individuals in the context of psychosis-spectrum illnesses and treatment. As first episode and clinical high-risk for psychosis (CHR-p) assessment and treatment become more accessible to increasingly diverse populations, there is a need for clinicians to demonstrate greater clinical competency working with individuals across diverse social backgrounds and identities. This talk (a) reviews the diagnostic profile of gender-expansive individuals seeking assessment at the CEDAR Clinic between 2017 and 2020, (b) outlines gender-expansive practices implemented by this clinic to support clinician competency and improve care for gender-expansive patients, and (c) discusses areas for future research on psychosis risk in gender-expansive populations.   To watch the recording, please go: https://youtu.be/o5noKFh2dh0
Published: May 6, 2022
Multimedia
May 5, 2022 Coordinated specialty care for early psychosis is an evidence-based treatment model aimed at fostering resilience and recovery for individuals who have experienced a first episode of psychosis or are at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. Each webinar will be co-presented by a professional with expertise in that component of care, as well as an individual with lived experience who can speak to how this aspect of care was meaningful in their journey towards recovery. This series is geared toward any individuals that are new to working on an Early Psychosis Specialty Team – including students, clinicians, prescribers, supported employment specialists, family clinicians, and peer specialists.   To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/5H0QaNFN40o    
Published: May 5, 2022
Multimedia
/*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*--> April 26, 2022 A study team from the Center for Addiction Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital will discuss their recent trial which found that training doctors and CHWs in evidence-based practices for smoking cessation more than doubled quit rates for individuals with SMI. An active discussion will follow to listen and learn from those with field experience, particularly psychiatric rehabilitation workers, and to brainstorm ways to incorporate an emphasis on tobacco cessation into routine client care.    To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/80hU5pqedco   /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*--> Presenters: Dr. Kristina Schnitzer, Dr. Eden Evins, and Dr. Corinne Cather    
Published: April 26, 2022
Multimedia
Evidence Based Co-Occurring Disorders Treatment     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.      DESCRIPTION: In this presentation you will learn evidence-based approaches to co-occurring disorders treatment and recovery including: the use of motivational incentives; feedback informed treatment; stage-based interventions; CBT; twelve step facilitation; evidence-based family therapy and integrated approaches. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding the reason that some clinicians are more evidence based than others and how to be influenced by the evidence in your work with clients with co-occurring disorders.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Articulate five evidence-based approaches to co-occurring disorders treatment. Work with clients with co-occurring disorders in an evidence based, integrated manner. Be influenced by evidence-based practices in your work with clients with co-occurring disorders.       PRESENTER: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the State Project Manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC and PTTC. Mark has worked for 40 years as a social worker, educator, and part of the SUD workforce. He is founder of the Online Museum of African American Addictions, Treatment and Recovery and co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery-oriented high school in Illinois. Mark is also an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, and the British Islands.    Recently, Mark Sanders was named as the 2021 recipient of the NAADAC Enlightenment Award in recognition of his outstanding work and contributions to NAADAC, the field of SUD services, and SUD professionals. He is also the recipient of the Illinois Association for Behavioral Health’s 2021 Lawrence Goodman Friend of the Field award in honor of the many years of dedicated service Mark has provided to communities throughout his home state of Illinois.
Published: April 19, 2022
Multimedia
April 7, 2022   /*--> Coordinated specialty care for early psychosis is an evidence-based treatment model aimed at fostering resilience and recovery for individuals who have experienced the first episode of psychosis or are at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. Each webinar will be co-presented by a professional with expertise in that component of care, as well as an individual with lived experience who can speak to how this aspect of care was meaningful in their journey towards recovery. This series is geared toward any individuals that are new to working on an Early Psychosis Specialty Team – including students, clinicians, prescribers, supported employment specialists, family clinicians, and peer specialists. To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/B9dgPM5Q5XM Presenter:  /*--> Raelyn Elliott-Remes & Jacob Halmich      
Published: April 7, 2022
Multimedia
March 16, 2022   to watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/l2QUKbyD4rk   The program describes a novel approach to engaging patients with psychosis and their families. We seek the development of true collaboration. Critical in this approach is establishing a community of individuals with a common interest that provides support for each other. The support allows the treatment team to secure the patient's trust, develop a therapeutic relationship and do the hard work of creating an optimal clozapine regimen. This session will go on to:   describe how we develop clozapine regimens that minimize predictable side effects and optimize benefits;  share our results in improving patient outcomes. Presenters: Robert Laitmain, MD & Matcheri Keshavan, MD  
Published: March 16, 2022
Multimedia
Each session will go from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. MT.  Event Description Depression is a condition experienced by a significant number of individuals, from children, adolescents, and adults. With the ongoing pandemic, the prevalence of depression has increased significantly. This three-part series reviewed evidence-based screening, diagnosis, and treatment of depression within primary care settings.    Session 1 - February 15, 2022 Screening for and Diagnosis of Depression in Primary Care   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives   Identify the use of common screening tools for depression/suicide risk in primary care  Utilize or recall common treatments for depression  Identify common medical differentials/co-morbidities of depression    Session 2 - March 1, 2022 Evidence-Based Treatment of Depression   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives   Identify evidence-based interventions for depression and suicide response  Utilize both pharmacologic and therapeutic interventions in treating to target  Identify practices in depression prevention planning    Session 3 - March 15, 2022 Pathways of Care: Building a Depression Follow-Up Program   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives    Identify high-risk behavioral health patients  Recognize and define the roles of providers in a collaborative care model  Utilize a registry in order to track patient response to care    Trainers Dr. Andrew McLean                     Dr. McLean is Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He obtained his medical degree from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, completed a psychiatry residency at the University of Wisconsin and an M.P.H. degree from the University of Minnesota. He has been recognized as a UND School of Medicine Distinguished Alumnus, has received the American Psychiatric Association Bruno Lima award for outstanding contributions to Disaster Psychiatry, and has been conferred with numerous teaching excellence awards. Dr. McLean previously was the Medical Director of the ND Department of Human Services. He has served on numerous clinical, administrative and regulatory boards including medical licensing and professional health programs. He has lectured internationally on pertinent behavioral and public health issues. Dr. McLean has a particular interest in collaborative models of care. He also is interested in individual and community resilience.    Robin Landwehr, LPCC                     Robin is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) who holds a Master of Science degree in mental health counseling from Capella University, and a Doctor of Behavioral Health (DBH) degree from Arizona State University. She previously served as the behavioral health director at a Federally Qualified Health Center where she helped establish a Medication Assisted Treatment Program for individuals with opioid use disorder. During her career, she has been fortunate enough to be involved in numerous writing projects, provided many trainings, practiced as part of a collaborative care team, and provided clinical supervision. Her experience as a clinical counselor includes assisting individuals struggling with trauma, depression, anxiety, health behaviors, substance abuse, and other issues. She is a certified instructor in the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) and Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) suicide prevention programs.    Ken Flanagan                       Dr. Kenneth Flanagan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. He currently serves as a curriculum developer for the Mountain Plains Mental Health and Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.  Dr. Flanagan holds a license as a clinical social worker and provides counseling and behavioral management services with a clinical focus on depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues and chronic pain. He received his MSW and Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Dr. Flanagan has held a range of clinical and administrative positions in healthcare and community-based organizations.   
Published: March 15, 2022
Multimedia
/*-->*/ /*--> Coordinated specialty care for early psychosis is an evidence-based treatment model aimed at fostering resilience and recovery for individuals who have experienced a first episode of psychosis or are at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. Each webinar will be co-presented by a professional with expertise in that component of care, as well as an individual with lived experience who can speak to how this aspect of care was meaningful in their journey towards recovery. This series is geared towards any individuals that are new to working on an Early Psychosis Specialty Team – including students, clinicians, prescribers, supported employment specialists, family clinicians, and peer specialists.   Presenter:  /*-->*/ /*--> Patrick Kaufmann  
Published: February 3, 2022
Multimedia
  Release Date: 1/06/2022 Expiration Date: 1/05/2023 The estimated time to complete this enduring material is 60 minutes. Course ID: 54073   TARGET AUDIENCE This enduring material is intended for behavioral health providers (psychologists and masters level counselors), primary care providers (physicians, NPs, PAs), and Nurses (RNs).   EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this enduring material, the participant should be better able to: Describe measurement-based care (MBC) as an evidence-based practice. Discuss the use and characteristics of MBC for patient-centered communication and treatment engagement. Explain the use and characteristics of MBC for signaling clinicians to emergent problems or issues and monitoring treatment progress.   REQUIREMENTS FOR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION  In order to receive continuing education credits, you must complete these steps prior to the activity expiration date. View the entire presentation Click on claim credit link Log into your UNMC CCE account or create one Complete the post-test with a score of 80% or better Complete the online evaluation Save and print your certificate. Retain for future documentation.  Any questions regarding credit, please contact Bailey Wrenn 402-559-5145 or [email protected]   ACCREDITED CONTINUING EDUCATION In support of improving patient care, University of Nebraska Medical Center is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.              The University of Nebraska Medical Center designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The University of Nebraska Medical Center designates this activity for 1.0 ANCC contact hour. Nurses should only claim credit for the actual time spent participating in the activity. Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs. This activity has been approved for 1.0 credit hour of continuing education credit.   DISCLOSURE DECLARATION As a jointly accredited provider, the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) ensures accuracy, balance, objectivity, independence, and scientific rigor in its educational activities and is committed to protecting learners from promotion, marketing, and commercial bias. Faculty (authors, presenters, speakers) are encouraged to provide a balanced view of therapeutic options by utilizing either generic names or other options available when utilizing trade names to ensure impartiality. All faculty, planners and others in a position to control continuing education content participating in a UNMC accredited activity are required to disclose all financial relationships with ineligible companies. As defined by the Standards for Integrity and Independence in Accredited Continuing Education, ineligible companies are organizations whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients. The accredited provider is responsible for mitigating relevant financial relationships in accredited continuing education.  Disclosure of these commitments and/or relationships is included in these activity materials so that participants may formulate their own judgments in interpreting its content and evaluating its recommendations. This activity may include presentations in which faculty may discuss off-label and/or investigational use of pharmaceuticals or instruments not yet FDA-approved. Participants should note that the use of products outside currently FDA-approved labeling should be considered experimental and are advised to consult current prescribing information for FDA-approved indications. All materials are included with the permission of the faculty. The opinions expressed are those of the faculty and are not to be construed as those of UNMC.   DISCLOSURES The accredited provider has mitigated and disclosed relevant financial relationships for the following faculty, planners, and others in control of content prior to assuming their roles:   FACULTY   Susan Douglas, PhD Mirah: Clinical Strategy Director     PLANNING COMMITTEE The below planning committee have nothing to disclose: Ty Callahan, PhD, ABPP Brandy Clarke, PhD, LP Valeta Creason-Wahl, HMCC Julie Fedderson, MD Laura Holly, BS Christian Klepper, PsyD Renee Paulin, MSN, RN, CWOCN Holly Roberts, PhD Bailey Wrenn, MA   FINANCIAL SUPPORT   This webinar series is sponsored by UnitedHealthCare Community Plan.   To view the webinar, click "View Resource" in the blue box above.   Claim credit: https://cmetracker.net/UNMCCE/Publisher?page=pubOpen#/myPortal   Learn more about UnitedHealthcare Behavioral Health Education Series  
Published: January 6, 2022
Multimedia
Alcohol is STILL a Drug: An Exploratory Webinar Series (December 7, 2021) Recording   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.     DESCRIPTION  Alcohol is STILL a drug.  The opioid crisis, increase in stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization dominate the news— yet alcohol remains the number one substance causing health, social, legal and financial problems throughout the US. While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from alcohol use disorder, we’ll also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects every person in the US.   The December 7, 2021 session will focus on Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment. In this workshop, Joe Rosenfeld will briefly discuss the constant nature of alcohol as an epidemic and the early (pre-1950’s) efforts at treatment and recovery. Then present the emergence of the current Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment system and identify an array of evidence supported practices currently in use.   In the process, Joe will “slay” a long-held treatment practice. But you’ll have to watch to learn which one.   SPEAKER Dr. Joseph Rosenfeld, Psy.D., CRADC., HS-BCP Dr. Rosenfeld is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, a Certified Reciprocal Alcoholism and Other Drug Counselor, and Human Services - Board Certified Professional.  He is a Professor in the Addiction Counselor Training Program within the Human Services Department at Elgin Community College.   SERIES LEARNING OBJECTIVES These are the overall learning objectives for the full 10-session series:  Summarize the current impacts of problematic alcohol use in various/special populations, including pregnant women, youth, rural, and minority populations.  Assess and prioritize alcohol reduction efforts in targeted settings.  Describe the current efforts to curb problematic alcohol use, including best practices in providing treatment. 
Published: December 13, 2021
Multimedia
In this webinar, Mid-America MHTTC trainers discuss strategies for addressing the mental health needs of health care professionals, including types of supports employers and organizations can implement to help those who are tasked with helping others. Learn more: https://bit.ly/NewEpidemic2021 Authors: Christian Klepper, PsyD
Published: November 29, 2021
Multimedia
  TARGET AUDIENCE This enduring material is intended for behavioral health providers (psychologists and masters level counselors), primary care providers (physicians, NPs, PAs), and Nurses (RNs).   EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this enduring material, the participant should be better able to: Describe symptoms of and diagnostic criteria for ADHD Describe common alternative explanations for symptoms of ADHD and common comorbidities associated with ADHD, and why comprehensive evaluation is important Discuss comprehensive evaluation for ADHD Discuss empirically supported interventions for ADHD     Learn more about UnitedHealthcare Behavioral Health Education Series  
Published: November 29, 2021
Multimedia
November 22, 2021   Click on "view resource" to watch recording. Slides coming soon!     In this presentation, I will provide an overview of three questions: how the brain processes art and how art impacts the brain. I then discuss the relation between art and mental health, and how art can be therapeutic. Presenter(s): Dr. Keshavan is Stanley Cobb Professor and Academic Head of the Harvard Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He has conducted early psychosis intervention and research for nearly three decades. He founded one of the first early psychosis clinical programs in the nation, services for treatment in early psychoses in Pittsburgh in 1990. He has published over 600 papers and 4 books on psychotic and related disorders including early psychosis neurobiology and intervention and organized educational conferences focused on early intervention in psychosis, biannually in Pittsburgh in Detroit and annually in Boston. He has been developing, efficacy-testing, and implementing cognitive enhancement therapy (CET), listed as an evidence-based intervention for schizophrenia by SAMHSA in the early course of schizophrenia over the past decade. He edits the Elsevier journal Schizophrenia Research, and is on the editorial board of several other journals, including the Journal of Early Intervention in Psychiatry, and is the recipient of the 2019 Research Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).
Published: November 22, 2021
Presentation Slides
Watch the presentation. This presentation provides an orientation to education as a social determinant of health.   Watch corresponding presentation Education  Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment  
Published: October 22, 2021
Presentation Slides
Watch the presentation. This presentation provides an orientation to education as a social determinant of health.   Watch corresponding presentation Trauma  Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment  
Published: October 22, 2021
Multimedia
Download the slides. This presentation provides an orientation to education as a social determinant of health.   Watch corresponding presentation Trauma  Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment  
Published: October 22, 2021
Multimedia
Download the slides. This presentation provides an orientation to trauma as a social determinant of health.   Watch corresponding presentation Education  Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment  
Published: October 22, 2021
Print Media
Several forces have converged over the last decade to call for a reconsideration of how to view, discuss, prescribe, and assess medications for effectiveness in the care of persons with serious mental illness and/or substance use disorders. This document briefly reviews these issues and describes the point of convergence as being patient-centered medicine. We offer these six evidence-based principles, illustrated using clinical vignettes, for promoting self-management in individuals with mental illness and/or addictions: Elicit the person’s and family’s perspectives on the concerns bringing them to care. Assess the person’s and family’s perceived needs and priorities, including any cultural preferences (e.g., ethnic, sexual, spiritual). Identify the person’s short- and long-term goals. Identify medication targets that indicate that the person is overcoming barriers to life goals or increasing their quality of life (beyond symptom reduction). Prescribe medication as one component of an overall self-management plan that builds on personal and family strengths. Identify and address barriers to self-management, including the need for additional supports (e.g., transportation, child care, reminders, environmental modifications).    
Published: October 21, 2021
Presentation Slides
Watch the webinar. This presentation provides an orientation to housing instability as a social determinant of health. You will:​ Learn what housing instability includes (e.g., cost burdened, overcrowding, forced/multiple moves, homelessness) ​ Learn how housing instability affects physical and mental health. Learn how to assess for housing instability and make referrals for appropriate supports.     Watch corresponding presentation Housing  Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment
Published: September 16, 2021
1 2 3
Copyright © 2024 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network
map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down