Products and Resources Catalog

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Interactive Resource
The Comprehensive School Mental Health Case Examples Training Packet was developed to be utilized with multi-disciplinary school teams, including building, district, and/or community professionals, who are tasked with assessing the academic, mental, and behavioral health needs of students.
Published: April 12, 2024
Interactive Resource, Website
Objectives Discuss the prevalence and risk factors for anxiety disorders in youth Discuss DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and differences between anxiety disorders Identify anxiety screening and assessment measures and determine when referral for intervention is warranted Describe evidence-based intervention strategies to treat pediatric anxiety with modifications appropriate for IPC Learn more about HealtheKnowledge here: HealtheKnowledge Courses Authors and Contributors: Christian Klepper, PsyD - primary author Rachel Valleley - primary author Holly Roberts, PhD - contributor Kristen Johnson, PhD - contributor Alli Morton, PhD - contributor Erika Franta, PhD - contributor Britt Liebsack, PhD - contributor Hannah West, PhD - contributor Nichole Baker, PhD - contributor Jessica Mandell, PhD - contributor Brandy Clarke, PhD - contributor  
Published: March 14, 2024
Interactive Resource, Website
This 1-hour course provides an overview of both pediatric primary care services and behavioral health services, and makes a case for integration in the pediatric integrated primary care setting. Objectives: Define pediatric primary care including the five components that encompass it according to the American Academy of Pediatrics Explain the elements of the quadruple aim in healthcare Define pediatric behavioral and mental health Describe traditional behavioral/mental healthcare and the challenges with meeting the needs of children and families Describe the role of behavioral health and primary care in addressing overall health for children, adolescents and their families Learn more about HealtheKnowledge here: HealtheKnowledge Courses Authors: Holly Roberts, Ph.D. Nichole Baker, Ph.D. Christian Klepper, PsyD. John Vann, M.D. Brandy Clarke, Ph.D.  
Published: February 22, 2024
Interactive Resource
Positionality refers to the social positions we hold in our society that influence how we interact with the world. As mental health providers, researchers, and advocates, our social positions influence our approach to our work, and reflection on positionality can allow us to identify our limitations and advance equity. The Positionality Project at the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) aims to provide resources for the mental health workforce in Region 6 to understand and integrate positionality into their work. This brochure includes foundational information for mental health providers, researchers, and advocates to understand positionality. It provides a metaphor to understand positionality, explores how positionality can be used in mental health, provides a hypothetical example of applying positionality, and shares guiding questions for developing a positionality statement, which is one method for reflecting on positionality. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of the brochure. We hope that the brochure provides an introduction to this critical topic and inspires further learning.
Published: October 13, 2023
Interactive Resource
This 5-hour, self-paced course is the STRIDE Group Facilitator Training, a follow up to the popular Empowering Wellness in Mental Health: Helping People with their Lifestyle Changes, which outlines the principles and evidence behind the STRIDE Program, developed by Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research. What makes this course unique is that it was developed specifically for people living with mental illness, taking anti-psychotic medications to help reduce the cardiovascular risks often experienced by this population. Learn with the developers of the STRIDE Program to explore and understand the Group program curriculum. This online course was created by the Northwest Region 10 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).    Certificate of Completion/Contact Hours Available  Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUS with your licensing/credentialing entity.  The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, chemical dependency professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620,WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240. Registration and Technical Support How to register for a course at HealtheKnowledge and how to get technical support This online course was created by the Northwest Region 10 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: August 22, 2023
Interactive Resource
About this Resource: Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and 26% of the U.S. population. These states have large rural populations, high poverty rates, and face racial and cultural disparities in care. In addition the Southeast states have considerable clinical, geographic, workforce, and health system differences and often score below the median on state rankings for mental health outcomes. While these factors are important considerations when planning mental health care and support services, understanding these influences separately can be challenging. Similarly, determining the location of additional resources and the possibility of building or expanding upon mental health - public health partnerships may also be an important consideration. The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project provides information on Region IV priorities in an easy to understand graphical format. Click on the "View Resource" button above to access this map and learn more about the availability of public sector healthcare resources. Public Sector Healthcare Resources Relevant Factors: Locations of public sector healthcare resources, including Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and Mental Health facilities; provider shortage areas; and rural versus urban communities. Helpful Tips: To view each map in this visualization series, scroll using the gray scroller bar or gray arrows below. You may also click on each of the gray boxes (or tabs). Map 1 shows the location of FQHCs in Mental Health Provider Shortage Areas. Map 2 shows the location of FQHCs in rural versus urban areas. Map 3 shows the presence of healthcare facilities within each county. Map 4 shows the distance between FQHCs and Mental Health facilities within counties. References for Data Sources: ​​Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) Data Warehouse Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Behavioral Health Treatment Locator. 2023 County Health Rankings National Data Rankings data & documentation | County Health Rankings & Roadmaps
Published: August 8, 2023
Interactive Resource
This 5-hour, self-paced course is the STRIDE Group Facilitator Training, a follow up to the popular Empowering Wellness in Mental Health: Helping People with their Lifestyle Changes, which outlines the principles and evidence behind the STRIDE Program, developed by Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research. What makes this course unique is that it was developed specifically for people living with mental illness, taking anti-psychotic medications to help reduce the cardiovascular risks often experienced by this population. Learn with the developers of the STRIDE Program to explore and understand the Group program curriculum. This online course was created by the Northwest Region 10 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).    Certificate of Completion/Contact Hours Available  Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUS with your licensing/credentialing entity.  The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, chemical dependency professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620,WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240. Registration and Technical Support How to register for a course at HealtheKnowledge and how to get technical support This online course was created by the Northwest Region 10 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: February 21, 2023
Interactive Resource
This free interactive module walks participants through basic telehealth training capabilities.  Participants will... Learn about telehealth evolution, its current use, and legal and regulatory issues Identify various indications of telehealth service delivery Learn about telehealth etiquette  Discover ethical best practices for telehealth Learn the basic skills necessary to navigate the use of a telehealth platform    
Published: February 8, 2023
Interactive Resource
  The Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC have created an online flipbook for the Alcohol is STILL a Drug series. Alcohol is STILL a Drug is comprised of ten 30-minute videos recorded between September 2021–August 2022. Each video addresses the impacts of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and is presented by a leading professional in that field.    You can view the flipbook online or you can download a PDF version. The videos and supplemental resources are accessible in either format.      ABOUT THE SERIES: The opioid crisis, increasing stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization often dominate the news—yet alcohol remains the number one substance negatively impacting physical health, mental health, social engagement, and financial stability for individuals throughout the US.   While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from AUD, it will also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects everyone, even those who do not personally misuse alcohol.   The Alcohol Is Still a Drug series offers viewers the following learning objectives: Summarize the current impacts of problematic alcohol use in various/special populations, including pregnant women, youth, rural, and minority populations Assess and prioritize alcohol reduction efforts in targeted settings Describe the current efforts to curb problematic alcohol use, including best practices in providing treatment Understand the importance of person-centered approaches to treatment and recovery  
Published: September 19, 2022
Interactive Resource
Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated annually from September 15 to October 15 in the United States to recognize the contributions and influence of Hispanic Americans in the United States. While Hispanics have made and continue to make significant contributions to society, health inequities persist. This year, join the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities (OACBHA) and the Great Lakes MHTTC in our learning challenge as we seek to gain a better understanding of the Hispanic heritage, culture, barriers to behavioral health care, and how to address the systemic inequities faced by this growing population.   Connect with us on Facebook and share your most impactful and motivating takeaways from participating in the challenge!   This educational resource was created by OACBHA in partnership with the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: September 14, 2022
Interactive Resource
This resource booklet has many different resources for suicide prevention, including sections for crisis, learning about suicide and how to help yourself or a friend, finding a therapist, apps and interactive tools for keeping yourself safe, as well as resources for clinicians.
Published: September 2, 2022
Interactive Resource
This 2-hour self-paced course is designed to introduce the evidence-based practice of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) for ACT team members, and those who oversee ACT teams at various levels (e.g., agency, state). Covering the origins and philosophy, and core elements of high-fidelity ACT, this course provides an overview for those new to the model or who have limited experience with ACT. It can also be used as a 'refresher' training for existing team members. The model is discussed in application through three fictional ACT service recipients, that have been informed by decades of experience by the course creators, Lorna Moser, PhD (UNC), and Maria Monroe-DeVita, PhD (UW).   Learning Outcomes Describe how ACT originated within the mental health system Identify the population for whom ACT is intended to serve Name at least 4 key features of ACT     List at least four team member roles within a fully staffed ACT team Describe the importance of fidelity to the ACT model   Certificate of Completion/Contact Hours Available  Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUS with your licensing/credentialing entity.  The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, chemical dependency professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620,WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240.   Trainers     Lorna Moser, PhD, Lorna Moser, PhD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Director of the Institute for Best Practice, Center for Excellence in Community Mental Health.         Maria Monroe-DeVita, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Co-Director of the SPIRIT Lab and the Washington State Center of Excellence in Early Psychosis.   Registration and Technical Support How to register for a course at HealtheKnowledge and how to get technical support This online course was created by the Northwest Region 10 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: August 3, 2022
Interactive Resource
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This FREE online course was developed by the AIMS Center at the University of Washington with funding provided by HealthierHere. People living with serious mental illness die on average 25 years earlier than people in the general population, largely due to cardiovascular diseases like strokes and heart attacks. In recent years, behavioral health agencies have taken on responsibility to monitor and support the health status of their clients. Case managers in behavioral health agencies form the backbone of efforts to improve the medical outcomes of people living with serious mental illness. This course is designed to prepare case managers for this work. This free online course reviews the reality of increased premature mortality in people living with serious mental illness, explores the medical and social causes of this increased mortality as well as approaches to reducing it and introduces some practical tools and approaches to improving health in the populations case managers serve. CLICK "VIEW RESOURCE" BUTTON ABOVE TO LEARN MORE AND TAKE THE COURSE      
Published: August 1, 2022
Interactive Resource
The Great Lakes MHTTC has created a supplemental discussion guide for educators who are using Classroom WISE, a free 3-part training program for K-12 teachers and school staff.   The Classroom WISE Discussion Guide contains the following information: Using the NIATx model for process improvement to implement Classroom WISE strategies in schools Best practices for collecting data and measuring change Establishing and facilitating Classroom WISE discussion groups Considerations for implementing and applying Classroom WISE strategies Book study activities for continued education, including reading recommendations Group discussion guides for each of the six Classroom WISE modules   Download the Classroom WISE Discussion Guide by clicking on the button above, and visit classroomwise.org to begin engaging in this valuable, self-paced training opportunity!  
Published: July 25, 2022
Interactive Resource
La Comunidad LGBT+ Latinx: Las consecuencias de la interseccionalidad El material de este libro subraya la necesidad crítica de comprender cómo las intersecciones entre cultura, estatus de minoría étnica, identidad de género y la orientación sexual influyen sobre la salud psicológica y el bienestar de las poblaciones LGBTQ+ Latinx.   Celebrando la diversidad y nuestras identidades a través de año para fortalecer la salud mental
Published: July 20, 2022
Interactive Resource
  The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The consequences of intersectionality The material in this curriculum underscores the critical need to understand how intersections between culture, ethnic minority status, gender identity, and sexual orientation influence the psychological health and wellbeing of LGBTQ+ Latinx populations.   Celebrating diversity and our identities throughout the year to strengthen mental health
Published: July 20, 2022
Interactive Resource
About this Resource: Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and approximately one-quarter of the U.S. population. These states have large rural populations, high poverty rates, and face racial and cultural disparities in care. In addition the Southeast states have considerable clinical, geographic, workforce, and health system differences and often score below the median on state rankings for a variety of mental health outcomes.  These factors are important considerations when planning mental health care and support services; however, understanding the interplay of these influences can be challenging.  The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project demonstrates the potential ways these factors intersect as well as areas where measures could be taken to remove barriers and improve mental health. Many counties in Region IV are doubly disadvantaged with a high degree of mental health burden co-exiting with mental health provider shortages. These counties should be a high priority in efforts to expand the mental health workforce in the Southeast.    Potential Impact of Workforce Shortages on Mental Health Care Relevant Factors: Availability of mental health professionals and mental health outcomes (i.e., rates of suicide, mental health distress). How to Use: Click on "VIEW RESOURCE" above to access our interactive map and visualize the intersection of these factors.    
Published: June 13, 2022
Interactive Resource
Since its release in June 2021, over 10,000 participants have completed the Classroom WISE online course. This map provides a geographic breakdown of where participants are completing the course. Note: This map is updated quarterly, with the last update occurring on March 31, 2024.    
Published: May 23, 2022
Interactive Resource
About this Resource: Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and 26% of the U.S. population. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide continues to be a leading cause of death and rates are increasing across the US, including the Southeast region. Populations at risk in Region IV states may face geographical disparities in accessing care, in particular crisis services. Visualizing relevant factors such as county-level suicide rates and available resources (e.g., crisis services), can be a challenge in a large, diverse region. The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project provides information on Region IV priorities in an easy to understand graphical format.   Suicide and Crisis Services Access Relevant Factors: County level suicide rates, behavioral health facilities providing crisis services. To view each map in this visualization series, scroll using the grey scroller bar or grey arrows below. You may also click on each of the grey boxes (or tabs) below. Map 1 shows the suicide rates by county. Map 2 shows the availability of crisis intervention teams. Map 3 shows the availability of emergency mobile services. References for data sources are provided in the last tab.
Published: December 3, 2021
Interactive Resource
The Adult Resilience Curriculum (ARC) Workbook for Professionals is a resource for professionals experiencing stress and burnout to use in conjunction with the ARC. Learners can use the workbook whether following along with the modules individually or as part of an organization. The workbook covers the core modules and provides space for activities and note-taking. The ARC is a 10-module model for implementing well-being at both the individual and organizational level. The curriculum is rooted in adult positive psychology and organizational well-being theories, and it has been adapted to apply across medical and educational settings. You might like: ARC for Health Professionals ARC for Educators Professional Well-Being  
Published: September 22, 2021
Interactive Resource
This 12 hour course offers recommendations to cultivate a compassionate school community that will buffer against the negative effects of trauma, build resilience for all students, and provide stress-relief and enhanced well-being for teachers and other school personnel as well as students. Participants will learn how to implement the Compassionate School Mental Health model being used to enhance services to schools and districts in the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center's Childhood Trauma-Learning Collaborative. Learn about the neurobiology of trauma and toxic stress, how it affects staff and student well-being, and best practices for preventing, responding to, and alleviating the effects of trauma. Get guidance on developing a vision to transform into a compassionate school community that includes the voices of many stakeholders. Gain an understanding of how a compassionate school mental health support system can help schools create systems, policies, and protocols to prevent, address, and recover from tragedies and crises including staff or student suicide, school violence, natural disasters, and global pandemics. All of these activities, including case studies, will allow for knowledge application and prepare participants to consider implications for schoolwide implementation.   This course was developed by the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center with funding by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).   12-hour CEs available
Published: August 10, 2021
Interactive Resource
About this Resource:  Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and 26% of the U.S. population. These states have large rural populations, high poverty rates, and face racial and cultural disparities in care. In addition the Southeast states have experienced considerable growth in Asian American communities in recent decades. Cultural and linguistic factors are important considerations when planning mental health care and support services for clients and families in these communities. Visualizing influences such as country of origin, race/ethnicity, and access to linguistically and culturally competent care can be a challenge in a large, diverse region. The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project provides information on Region IV priorities in an easy to understand graphical format.   Asian American Communities and Mental Health Care Access Relevant Factors: Countries of origin, mental health facilities providing language services How to Use: Click on "VIEW RESOURCE" to access interactive map and visualize the intersection of these factors by Region IV State or County. To view each map in this visualization series, scroll using the grey scroller bar or grey arrows below. You may also click on each of the grey boxes (or tabs) below. Map 1 shows population by county. Map 2 shows distribution of people identifying as Asian. Map 3 shows mental health facilities offering language services. References for data sources are provided in the last tab.
Published: July 1, 2021
Interactive Resource
About this Resource: Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and 26% of the U.S. population. These states have large rural populations which tend to have reduced access to mental health care.  Assessing the availability and accessibility of mental health services, in particular evidence-based practices, for rural residents can be challenging. The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project provides information on Region IV priorities in an easy to understand graphical format.   Potential Impact of Rurality on Mental Health Care Access Relevant Factors: Mental health facility availability and evidence-based practice offerings How to Use: Click on "VIEW RESOURCE" to access interactive map and visualize the intersection of these factors by county, state or region.
Published: April 9, 2021
Interactive Resource
As we’re all adapting activities, meetings and content to online platforms, we want to ensure that accessibility, diversity, equity, and inclusion are a priority. This product provides a list of suggestions regarding equitable and inclusive practices for online events. It will guide you through things to consider while evaluating dates and times for your event, the registration process, marketing and communications materials, inviting speakers and reach out for attendees, trauma informed considerations and final feedback with the organizing team and participants.
Published: March 2, 2021
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