Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: As caring and competent providers, you realize the importance of having readily available tools to share with your clients whether you are meeting for the 1st or the 15th time. Few evidence based practices offer relevant and accessible skills for decreasing distress, or the vulnerability to distress, like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).  Although not a comprehensive DBT course, this 4 module seminar provides a snapshot of some of the foundational skills of DBT. Learn how you can integrate DBT-informed skills into your work with clients from a trauma psychologist trained in DBT approaches. Week 1: Learn how to assess clients' motivation for treatment and identify behavior in the first session Identify the three states of mind that govern behavior Analyze unhelpful behaviors to decrease their likelihood of recurring in the future Discover an overarching problem solving framework to use across situations Explore ways to integrate mindfulness practice into your work For access to all resources from this series, please visit our DBT resource page here.
Published: May 28, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: As caring and competent providers, you realize the importance of having readily available tools to share with your clients whether you are meeting for the 1st or the 15th time. Few evidence based practices offer relevant and accessible skills for decreasing distress, or the vulnerability to distress, like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).  Although not a comprehensive DBT course, this 4 module seminar provides a snapshot of some of the foundational skills of DBT. Learn how you can integrate DBT-informed skills into your work with clients from a trauma psychologist trained in DBT approaches. Week 2: Learn skills for helping clients validate their emotions  Discuss the importance of sensing, naming and managing emotions Identify ways to engage clients in their own assessment of their emotions Identify techniques to assist clients in developing practical strategies for addressing their emotions appropriately   For access to all resources from this series, please visit our DBT resource page here.
Published: May 28, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: As caring and competent providers, you realize the importance of having readily available tools to share with your clients whether you are meeting for the 1st or the 15th time. Few evidence based practices offer relevant and accessible skills for decreasing distress, or the vulnerability to distress, like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).  Although not a comprehensive DBT course, this 4 module seminar provides a snapshot of some of the foundational skills of DBT. Learn how you can integrate DBT-informed skills into your work with clients from a trauma psychologist trained in DBT approaches. Week 3: Learn skills for helping clients regulate their emotions  Discuss the purpose of emotions from a DBT informed perspective List at least two ways clients may benefit from improved emotion regulation Identify techniques to assist clients in developing practical strategies for regulating their emotions appropriately   For access to all resources from this series, please visit our DBT resource page here.
Published: May 28, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: As caring and competent providers, you realize the importance of having readily available tools to share with your clients whether you are meeting for the 1st or the 15th time. Few evidence based practices offer relevant and accessible skills for decreasing distress, or the vulnerability to distress, like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).  Although not a comprehensive DBT course, this 4 module seminar provides a snapshot of some of the foundational skills of DBT. Learn how you can integrate DBT-informed skills into your work with clients from a trauma psychologist trained in DBT approaches. Week 4: Learn skills for setting boundaries, practicing assertiveness and advocating for clients' needs  Differentiate characteristics of healthy vs unhealthy relationships Identify strategies to help clients clarify goals and objectives in interpersonal situations   For access to all resources from this series, please visit our DBT resource page here.
Published: May 28, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT Housing isn't "one size fits all," and tenants with mental or behavioral health conditions might need adjustments to their housing so they, too, can have a stable, healthy home. Reasonable accommodations and modifications can help tenants make these necessary adjustments to their rental so their house can become a home. During this presentation, attorneys will review what reasonable accommodations and modifications are, how to talk to landlords about them, and provide tips on handling difficult cases. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides RA guide for medical professionals Washington Low Income Housing Alliance - want to get involved with WLIHA? Please email [email protected] King County Tenant Resource Line, open M-F (except holidays) from 9 AM to 1 PM: (206) 580-0762 Solid Ground classes: Webinars for tenants  FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation. Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: May 24, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT It’s estimated that 50 million adults in the United States have chronic daily pain and approximately 19.6 million of those adults are experiencing high impact chronic pain that interferes with daily life or work activities. Nation-wide the cost of chronic pain is estimated to be between $560-635 billion annually and our nation is facing an opioid crisis that, over the past two decades, has resulted in an unprecedented wave of overdose deaths associated with prescription opioids, heroin, and synthetic opioids. Multidisciplinary and biopsychosocial pain management has long been the gold standard for the treatment of care, yet most allied behavioral health professionals are not trained in evidence-based interventions for chronic pain. This 90-minute workshop will utilize the shared knowledge of the University of Washington Center for Pain Relief’s multidisciplinary team to provide education and training on evidence-based interventions to support those in chronic pain. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides painTRAINER - a free online tool for learning to manage pain TEDxAdelaide - Lorimer Moseley - Why Things Hurt Full Catastrophe Living (Revised Edition) by Jon Kabat-Zinn Palouse Mindfulness - a free online self directed MBSR course FACILITATORS Kaitlin Touza, PhD Kaitlin Touza is a pain psychologist and acting assistant professor at the University of Washington’s Center for Pain Relief. She provides evidence-based individual and group intervention, including CBT, ACT, EAET, and PRT.  She also provides consultation to a broad population in the Pacific Northwest region and Alaska through UW’s TelePain program. Kaitlin is fellowship trained at Stanford in clinical pain psychology and is committed to multidisciplinary care and education in pain management. She is passionate about educational outreach and program development for patients, family members, and healthcare providers, with the goal of improving access to specialized multidisciplinary pain management in rural and underserved populations. She believes in a patient-centered, evidence-based, and biopsychosocial approach to intervention, program development, and assessment.   Bethany Pester, PhD Bethany Pester is a pain psychologist and acting assistant professor at the University of Washington’s Center for Pain Relief. Her patient-centered approach incorporates evidence-based psychological treatments for chronic pain, such as CBT, ACT, EAET, and PRT, while partnering with each patient to understand their unique needs and tailor treatment accordingly. Bethany has collaborated with research teams at UW/Seattle Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical System, Medical University of South Carolina, and academic medical centers across Michigan to study biopsychosocial approaches to understand, treat, and prevent acute and chronic pain. She is passionate about advancing research to better understand these complex conditions and translate discoveries into effective personalized treatments for children, adolescents, and adults.   Eric Wanzel, MSW, LICSW Eric Wanzel is a masters-level therapist at the University of Washington’s Center for Pain Relief.  Eric has a special interest in the intersections between chronic pain and PTSD and provides evidence-based interventions to this population including CBT, ACT, PRT, CPT, PE, and WET.  He received his foundational training at the State University of New York and specialized training with the Neuro Orthopaedic Institute Australasia (i.e. noigroup) in pain neuroscience education and graded motor imagery.  Eric strives to provide whole person and multidisciplinary healthcare to underserved populations in addition to educational outreach and training for healthcare providers.   Elisabeth Powelson, MD, MSc Elisabeth Powelson is trained in anesthesia and pain medicine and treats patients at the University of Washington’s Center for Pain Relief and Harborview Medical Center. Additionally, she is an acting assistant professor in Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine and a T32 Research Fellow at the Pediatric and Sleep Innovations Lab.  She has a special interest in post-traumatic pain, PTSD, and pain in older adults. She believes that pain treatment requires a comprehensive multimodal approach and focuses on a partnership with her patients to improve their overall wellness and improve their quality of life.  Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: May 24, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Using Data to Promote Equity, originally presented on 5/14/2024. Slide presentation
Published: May 23, 2024
Multimedia
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare providers found themselves abruptly thrust into the world of telehealth services delivery. As agencies, clinicians, and clients increased the use of these new technologies and methods of clinical practice and collaboration, an apparent need for ethical best practices within this modality arose. This presentation will emphasize ethical best practices using technology and telehealth, ethical responses to unique challenges faced by clients and providers using this modality, and ethical concerns unique to using virtual methods in clinical practice.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this educational activity, learners will be able to: Identify ethical concerns specific to virtual service delivery in their clinical practice. Identify ethical responses to challenges associated with the use of virtual technologies. Identify and mitigate limitations in the use of technology and virtual platforms in their work.   PRESENTER:  Dr. Jill D. Stinson is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She received her dual doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Psychology, Policy, and Law from the University of Arizona prior to serving as the Director of Sex Offender Treatment at Fulton State Hospital with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Her teaching focuses on professional ethics, forensic psychology, and psychological assessment, while her research focuses on serious mental illness, personality disorders, self-regulatory problems, and histories of early childhood maltreatment in persons who have committed violent and sexual offenses, as well as issues related to community re-entry, stigma, and suicidality in justice-involved populations. Dr. Stinson has authored three books related to etiology and treatment of sexual offending and motivation to engage in therapy. She is the incoming Editor-in-Chief for Sexual Abuse, Chair of the ETSU Campus IRB, and Secretary of the Board of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 22, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Executive function symptoms are common effects of everyday stress, myriad psychological concerns and, crucially, trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Yet, Criterion E—that ADHD is a diagnosis of exclusion—is often ignored. How can we adequately assess for ADHD given the pervasiveness of trauma? Best practice considerations will be discussed.     Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP  Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology. 
Published: May 20, 2024
Multimedia
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic. The topic of webinar session 3 was "Peer Specialist Roles in PCRP-Aligning with Peer Ethics & Values." We know that in person-centered recovery planning (PCRP), the person receiving services makes decisions and takes ownership of their plan for recovery. This can be a new and uncomfortable role for people initially, for a variety of reasons. Peer supporters join with individuals to discover and advocate for what they want and need. This does not mean that the peer provider will always agree with people’s choices — however, it’s ALWAYS their ethical responsibility to support individuals in their unique recovery journey as that individual defines it. This 90-min webinar highlighted the mutually beneficial relationship between PCRP and peer support, as well as how staff at clinical provider organizations can intentionally enhance this connection. Participants were invited to explore tensions that arise when peer professionals work to maintain their never-directive, non-clinical stance while immersed in an environment that is heavily defined by clinical professionals, processes and services.   At the end of the session, participants were able to: Describe a “must do” and a “must not do” related to the role of peer support in PCRP, Name one way that professional peer support ethics supports a person-centered approach, and Identify two resources to support and promote peer provider role clarity in PCRP.   Presenters: Janis Tondora, Amy Pierce, and Amanda Bowman Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs.  
Published: May 16, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Review the increased nutritional needs of pregnancy and lactation. Learn about obstacles to achieving optimal dietary intake during pregnancy and after birth.  Explore the link between worsened mental health and poor or limited dietary intake in mothers and infants. Describe some steps clinicians can take to support people during the perinatal period through the lens of nutrition.    Trainer Nathaniel Johnson, PhD  Dr. Nathaniel Johnson is in his second year as an assistant professor at the University of North Dakota. He received his doctorate only a year and a half ago in Nutrition and Exercise Sciences from NDSU. He has published 14 research papers across a diverse set of journals such as Nutrition and Metabolic Insights, The Journal of Clinical Medicine, and Sensors. He is the founder and organizer of the UND Disability Affinity Network for Employees and is passionate about nutrition, disability, and equity. On a personal note, he loves his family, enjoys sports and competitions of all varieties, and has never met a dog that he doesn’t like.     
Published: May 15, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: Georgia has had a reputation for being a standard bearer of peer support for many years, and that reputation has been on display over the past 36 months with the launch of the new national 988 and 988lifeline.org. In this series, '988 in Every State', presenters explore the emerging needs and implementation of peer support services in areas where the traditional medical model remains dominant.
Published: May 15, 2024
Multimedia
  This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and communities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy, participants will learn: Key strategies for effective behavioral health advocacy Skills to engage using these key strategies   TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT   PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 14, 2024
Multimedia
The Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET) and the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) host a virtual monthly “Early Psychosis Prescriber Consultation Series” led by Dr. Matcheri Keshavan on prescribing practices for early psychosis, including a review of a selected monthly topic. Our May topic was “Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics (LAIs)." ​​Dr. Keshavan is Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, as well as Academic Head of the department. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Schizophrenia Research (Elsevier) and serves on the editorial board for journals such as Early Intervention in Psychiatry and Asian Journal of Psychiatry. His main areas of research include the neurodevelopmental basis of schizophrenia, neuroimaging, and early intervention. He has an active clinical practice.
Published: May 14, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
The Community Resiliency Model (CRM) is a skill-based wellness and prevention program that provides a biological, non-stigmatizing perspective on normal human reactions to stress and trauma. In this webinar we will apply CRM to schools by teaching skills for educators, administrators, and the school mental health workforce to reduce burnout and promote staff retention. Attendees will gain knowledge of concepts to understand stress responses in themselves and others as well as learn skills to help regain emotional balance after experiencing strong negative emotions. The knowledge and skills gained will help attendees avoid burn-out and promote cultures of resiliency in schools to better support student mental health.   Learning objectives: 1. Describe how stress and trauma affect mental and physical health. 2. Describe how CRM can protect and heal via sensory-motor awareness. 3. Explain the 6 CRM skills. 4. Understand how CRM can help reduce burnout and promote resiliency.
Published: May 14, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Autism in the Black Community, originally held on April 18, 2024. Presentation Slides
Published: May 11, 2024
Multimedia
Recording of the event Providing Weight-Inclusive Care: From Diet Culture and Weight Stigma to Health At Every Size, originally held on April 4, 2024. Presentation slides
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
Recording for the National Center for School Mental Health led event Mental Health Literacy: What Is It and Why Is It Important?, originally held on April 9, 2024. Slide presentation
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Due to the various barriers that children and adolescents often experience when accessing in-person mental healthcare (e.g., stigma, transportation, cost, insurance), digital interventions have been identified as an alternate and promising modality to facilitate evidence-based intervention service delivery for young people. Youth digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) are defined in this presentation as publicly available, online self-administered intervention programs that do not require a clinician or caregiver to implement. This area of literature is rapidly growing and specifically supports the effectiveness of the modification of cognitive-behavioral therapy into a digital/blended self-administered format. This presentation will outline the general evidence-base of youth DMHIs across settings, with a focus on CBT-based DMHIs and general best practices based on the current state of the literature. Specific guidance will be provided regarding which subpopulations of children and adolescents may be good candidates for DMHIs, along with subpopulations with less evidentiary support. Additionally, this presentation will provide introductory guidance for providers regarding how to use DMHIs within stepped models of care across various care settings (i.e., integrated pediatric primary care settings, schools, etc.). Further, this presentation will discuss practical considerations and limitations of using these tools in real world clinical and school settings, with step-by-step recommendations for ways to put these tools into practice. Finally, the DMHI literature will be discussed within the larger context of culturally sensitive behavioral and mental healthcare. Presented by: Maddy Esterer Maddy has a Master's degree in School Psychology and is a Provisionally Licensed Mental Health Practitioner in Nebraska. Maddy will be earning her PhD in School Psychology in 2024. Maddy currently works for the Munroe-Meyer Institute providing behavioral health services to youth, adolescents, and families in an integrated primary care setting. Maddy has experience providing behavioral and mental health supports to youth in schools and primary care settings in both Michigan and Nebraska. Maddy is also a team member of the Mid-America Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network, which assists mental health programs and providers in establishing evidence-based programs that are locally supported and sustainable in the Mid-America region. Maddy has been building her expertise in digital interventions for mental health for several years, which complements her other interests in trauma-informed care and equitable service provision across school and clinical settings.
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Download Session Slides Here Medicaid is a leading source of financing for school mental health services and programs, and in most states Medicaid-enrolled youth receive their benefits through Medicaid Managed Care plans.  This webinar will provide an enhanced understanding of how school mental health services can be paid for through Medicaid, with a special focus on Medicaid Managed Care.  Through this webinar, our presenter Dr. Adam Wilk (Emory University) will clarify how it can be determined whether a given service will be reimbursable through Medicaid, and highlight how school mental health care providers can have different experiences when working with Medicaid Managed Care plans to pay for their services. Learning Objectives: Specify the requirements that must be met in order to bill Medicaid or Medicaid Managed Care plans for school mental health services. Discuss ways in which these requirements may vary across states as well as, within a given state, across Medicaid Managed Care plans. Describe opportunities to learn about the Medicaid Managed Care plans in your state and how to meet their requirements to pay for school mental health services.    
Published: May 9, 2024
Multimedia
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more about other sessions from the series here. Bullying Prevention in Elementary and Middle Schools: Leveraging Experts in Your Building Description: Session attendants will learn about the types of bullying, strategies to disrupt bullying in schools, and focus specifically on how to leverage school resource officers, bus drivers, and other safety personnel in your bullying prevention efforts. Objectives: Participants will be able to describe at least four different types of bullying and their characteristics Participants will be able to identify a schoolwide strategy to disrupt bulying Participants will be able to train school resource officers, bus drivers, and other safety personnel in the schoolwide prevention strategy   Presentation Materials Recording Now Available!   About the Presenter: Sara McDaniel, Ph.D. Professor of Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Multiple Abilities, and Director of the Center for Interconnected Behavioral and Mental Health Systems at the University of Alabama Dr. McDaniel is a professor of Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Multiple Abilities at the University of Alabama and is the Director of the Center for Interconnected Behavioral and Mental Health Systems (CIBMHS). The CIBMHS is a research center that engages in rigorous research in schools and focuses on supporting schools and districts in implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and school-based mental health services. Dr. McDaniel conducts research and teaches in the areas of: (a) PBIS, (b) classroom management assessment and coaching, (c) Tier 2 social, emotional, and behavioral supports, and (d) preventative treatments for diverse populations of students placed at high risk.       Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: May 6, 2024
Multimedia
Recording for the National Center for School Mental Health led event Strategies for Discussing Race, Racial Discrimination, and Racial Trauma with Youth, originally held on March 12, 2024. Presentation Slides
Published: May 4, 2024
Multimedia
Springfield College MSW students hosted a virtual discussion about Social Emotional Learning (SEL.) There was also an opportunity for Q&A.   Presenter: Dr. Jean Conway is a graduate of Northeastern University (BS in Psychology), Boston College (MSW), and Concordia University (MS Ed). Jean brings over three decades of dedicated service as a social worker within the Worcester Public School system, demonstrating her strong commitment to supporting student social and emotional well-being.   This event was co-sponsored by Springfield College.
Published: May 3, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS EVENT People often think about sex as something that happens in our bodies, but much of our sex life occurs in our brains. It is critical to understand that for all genders our feelings and thoughts play a significant role in our sexual health. Anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, and psychosis all include symptoms that affect sexual life, such as decreased arousal, desire, or sexual satisfaction. Living with a mental illness can harm a person's self-esteem and make them feel undeserving of sexual attention or a healthy relationship. Medications to treat mental disorders can cause or exacerbate sexual dysfunction. Behavioral health providers play a unique role in their clients’ lives, and treatment relationships provide opportunities to support client sexual health. Session 1 of the series will provide the rationale for integrating sexual health and behavioral health care, and an overview of the research highlighting the importance of this issue. Part 1 of the Sexual Health Series (click to view all sessions in this series). ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides Sexual Health and Your Patients: A Provider’s Guide FACILITATORS Lydia Chwastiak, MD, MPH Dr. Chwastiak is a psychiatrist, internist and health services researcher who is a Professor in the UW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  Over the past 22 years, her research has focused on improving care and outcomes for people with complex needs in low resource settings, such as low-barrier primary care clinics and community mental health centers in the US, and primary and secondary medical settings in India and Nepal. Dr. Chwastiak is co-directs the UW Behavioral Research in HIV (BIRCH) Center, an NIMH-funded AIDS Research Center, and is the PI and co-director of the Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (NW MHTTC). Christina Clayton, MSW, LICSW, SUDP Christina Clayton has been in the behavioral health field since 1993, primarily serving adults who live with severe mental health issues, substance use, experience chronic homelessness, suffer from poor physical health, trauma and any number of co-occurring issues. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use, and highly values her direct service experience. Prior to joining the MHTTC in 2018, she spent 25 years working in and managing numerous clinical programs. She has provided licensure supervision, training and consultation, and has been a SW Field Instructor since 2000 She is Co-Director for the Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and Interim Assistant Dean & Director of Field Education for the UW School of Social Work. Victor Ramirez, MSPH Mountain West AETC, Washington State Training Coordinator Mountain West AETC Local Partner University of Washington, Washington State Training Coordinator   Laurie Sylla MHSA Laurie Sylla has been involved with AIDS since the early 1980s, as an agency/program director, direct service provider, advocate, researcher, coalition leader, and educator. She is a co-founder of the AIDS Council of Northeastern New York and the Community Research Initiative of New England (CRI). She is currently the Director of the Mountain West AIDS Education & Training Center, based at the University of Washington. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: May 3, 2024
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