Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The April 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating National Minority Health Month and Alcohol Awareness Month. It also features links to upcoming trainings focused on supporting Black students experiencing racial trauma, harnessing AI for substance misuse prevention, and process improvement. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon!   Event Description Statistics reveal a concerning trend: a significant number of men who have died by suicide had visited a healthcare provider within 30 days prior to their death. This alarming fact underscores the urgent need for more effective mental health interventions and support systems within rural settings. This session aims to shed light on the critical intersection of masculinity, mental health, and rural life, and explore how everyday places—such as doctors' offices, churches, workplaces, and community gatherings—can become gateways to meaningful conversations and interventions. Key topics will include: Understanding the barriers to mental health support for rural men, including stigma, limited resources, and cultural norms. Strategies for healthcare providers to initiate mental health conversations and recognize warning signs during routine visits. The role of churches and faith-based organizations in providing support and breaking down the stigma associated with mental health issues. Integrating mental health awareness and support into workplaces, especially in industries predominant in rural areas. The importance of Integrated Behavioral Health positions in creating a holistic approach to health care in rural settings. Trainer Andrew Jordan Thayer, PhD, LP
Published: April 3, 2024
Presentation Slides
Description: How did you learn about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery? What are the sources of information that shaped your views? This workshop will discuss how news, entertainment, and social media, as well as personal experience, influence how people understand substance use disorders and different pathways to recovery. It will also address common beliefs like, “You have to hit rock bottom” and “Recovery is rare,” and explain how attitudes, practices, and data collection have evolved. Information from the 2022 National Survey on Drug Use and Health and other sources will be presented, including prevalence of illicit substance use, substance use disorders, and co-occurring mental health challenges. Goals: Encourage participants to examine the sources of their attitudes and beliefs about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery, reconsider any misperceptions, and expand their understanding of these topics by presenting current research and statistics. Workshop Outline: Discuss where participants learned about addiction, treatment and recovery (personal experience, news and entertainment media, etc.). Highlight themes that often appear in films, TV shows, books, music, and social media, including overview of research findings. Discuss critiques of media coverage of these topics. Address common beliefs and whether they’re supported by evidence (hitting rock bottom, enabling and co-dependency, tough love). Discuss how personal experience influences attitudes and beliefs. Present graphics illustrating types of substance use (experimental, social, risky, etc.). Discuss different reasons people use drugs, and how that varies for different substances over time. Present substance use and mental health statistics, using sources such as the 2022 NSDUH. Discuss criteria for diagnosing a substance use disorder (mild, moderate or severe). Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Session Recording:
Published: April 2, 2024
Multimedia
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic.   Participants were able to: Define PCRP and its essential elements Increase familiarity with existing and emerging state and federal requirements regarding PCRP Articulate a minimum of three differences between traditional methods of treatment planning and best-practice PCRP Learn more about how the MHTTC PCRP Consultation Corner series can provide tools and resources to support the implementation of PCRP at your organization Presenters: Janis Tondora, Amy Pierce, and Amanda Bowman   Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   Amanda Bowman, LCSW-S, PSS (she/her) is a clinical social worker, certified peer specialist supervisor, and WRAPⓇ facilitator, using her professional and lived experience with mental health challenges to promote person-centered practices in behavioral health care. Coming from direct social work practice and administrative leadership within the public mental health system, she joined Via Hope in 2013, where she served as Recovery Institute Director until 2023. In this role, she oversaw the development and delivery of organizational change programs, which included statewide initiatives to support the implementation of person-centered planning, peer support services, and trauma-responsive work environments. As the owner of Sidecar Consulting, Amanda now facilitates collaborative learning events and serves as a subject matter expert for programs designed to support change within and across agencies. Outside of work, you may find Amanda with her family hiking the Barton Creek Greenbelt or enjoying live music.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs. More information about the series.  
Published: March 29, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Event Description We are excited to welcome back Alison Malmon, Founder and Executive Director of Active Minds, the nation’s premier nonprofit organization supporting mental health awareness and education for young adults, for a training that presents new insights about college mental health in 2024. While many people view the pandemic as something that has come and gone, college campuses across the country, particularly community colleges, are continuing to grapple with the ongoing, and in some cases accelerating, student mental health needs. Recent studies conducted on college campuses found that of the students interviewed, 60% of college students meet the criteria for at least one mental health condition, and 81% of students indicate that their mental health negatively impacted their academic performance in the past four weeks. Alison will present insights gathered from activities Active Minds hosts and coordinates with students on college campuses. These insights don’t necessarily dispute the statistics presented in the last paragraph but instead provide a clear picture of how effective mental health education, advocacy, and awareness are in changing the conversation around mental health, which in turn can positively impact statistics. In addition to the data Active Minds has collected, Alison will share some of the most innovative and effective approaches that Active Minds chapters use to support young adult well-being, particularly on college campuses. This training is for anyone who works with young adults and college-age youth. Trainer Alison Malmon Active Minds Founder & Executive Director
Published: March 28, 2024
Multimedia
    Session 1 - March 11 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 2 - March 25 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Session 3 - April 15 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 4 - April 22 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 5 - May 6 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 6 - May 20 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Series Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP, is returning to lead our first Mindful Monday series, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice, for Spring 2024. Join us as we continue to explore and experience different mindfulness practices related to the topics of creativity, rest, and self-care. This series is for anyone who desires to improve their overall well-being, resilience, and mental health.  The practices that are presented in the training are designed for quick and effective implementation both personally and professionally.  For mental and behavioral health practitioners these techniques can be easily incorporate into their practice.  Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” Attendees who have participated in past Mindful Monday series have the following to say about the training: “Incredibly validating experience”, “Love doing this- can we do it indefinitely”, “Thank you for this training. It is hard to recognize we also deserve to be heard, have needs/wants and slow down and breathe for a while.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on March 11th and will run every other week through May 20th, 2024.  Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Trainer Christina Ruggiero Master’s Counselling Psychology  Registered Psychotherapist 
Published: March 11, 2024
Multimedia
At the end of this presentation, participants were able to: Recognize the importance of understanding the historical context of the lives of older African Americans Recognize the importance of eliciting the older African American’s perspective of his/her mental and physical health challenges Elicit socio-cultural and spiritual beliefs that could influence an older African American’s health care choices and access to care Enhance knowledge of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of major mental health disorders when working with older African Americans   Presenter: Martha Crowler, PhD   This webinar was presented in collaboration with the Massachusetts Mental Health Center GrandRounds series.
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia
  To view resources from this training, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording   Event Description As part of our ongoing efforts to support the mental health needs of college students, we are proud to present a workshop focused on understanding how to effectively support young people as they move from high school into young adulthood. This workshop will provide information about anxiety in children, adolescents, and emerging adults. Attendees will gain a deeper understanding of psychosocial developmental milestones (e.g., independence, emotion regulation, identity formation) and the ways in which anxiety, stress, and sociocultural factors can interfere with the successful transition to young adulthood. Practical strategies for assessment and tools to support youth independence and college or workforce readiness will be reviewed. Dr. Lauren Hoffman will lead this training.  She is a clinical psychologist in New York City, who previously worked at the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CUCARD).  She has an extensive background and a passion for working with children and young adults. Please note:  This Workshop Wednesday training was moved due to scheduling conflicts.  This training will be recorded for later viewing. Trainer Lauren Hoffman, Psy.D. Clinical Psychologist Dr. Hoffman is a New York City-based licensed clinical psychologist specializing in treating anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and related challenges, including perfectionism, stress, sleep issues, and school or work problems. I have expertise in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Exposure and Response Prevention (ExRP), as well as mindfulness and acceptance-based techniques. I work with children, teens, and adults, with a particular emphasis on young adults navigating developmental transitions and challenges. Dr. Hoffman received her B.A. with honors in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University. Dr. Hoffman completed her predoctoral clinical internship at NYU Child Study Center/Bellevue Hospital Center and her postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders at Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Hoffman has advanced training and expertise in evidence-based treatment approaches, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Exposure and Response Prevention (ExRP), and Behavioral Activation. She regularly integrates mindfulness, acceptance techniques, and values-based approaches into her practice. For more information, click here.
Published: February 27, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The February 2024 issue features content from the Great Lakes ATTC celebrating Black History Month, including our upcoming 2024 Black History Month Panel Presentation. It also features a new educational brief on health equity in crisis systems, upcoming prevention trainings on drug trends in the region, and updates to the Classroom WISE curriculum for 2024. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: February 12, 2024
Print Media
  Mid-America Mental Health Technology Transfer Center. (2023). Mid-America MHTTC Year 5 School Mental Health Report.    
Published: February 7, 2024
Print Media
  Mid-America Mental Health Technology Transfer Center. (2023). Mid-America MHTTC Year 5 Report.    
Published: February 7, 2024
Multimedia
    Session 1 - January 11 To view resources from this training, please click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording Session 2 - January 25 To view resources from this training, please click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording Series Description This 2-part webinar series addresses the current trends of mental health on college campuses and technology-based options that can effectively address them. As colleges and universities move to address the ever-growing student mental health needs on and off campus, coupled with complex hybrid learning environments as a result of the pandemic, many institutions are now offering a plethora of student support resources across multiple modalities. Despite the increases in offered services, many counseling centers continue to be stretched thin. The causes are many including, but not limited to continuously increasing student behavioral health needs (with onsets both prior to and post-enrollment), disconnected messaging of offered services; and unintentional systemic barriers that can disproportionately impact underrepresented student populations. Given these dynamics, it is essential that campus communities focus on behavioral health models that meet students on their terms, connecting them with the right level of care at the right time. In Session 1, using current data, this presentation will review and analyze macro behavioral health trends on campus over the past decade. In Session 2, we will follow up with an explanation of the benefits of implementing an integrated multi-modal stepped-care model to support and sustain student mental health and well-being. These models ensure effective use of available student support resources, decrease institutional/systemic barriers with a “no wrong door approach,” and thus increase engagement, health outcomes, and student success. This will be presented through case studies of several campuses highlighting successes, challenges, and replicable insights. Several interactive components will be utilized including live polls and interactive whiteboarding allowing participants to identify strengths, growth, edges, and ways to impart change on their campuses in real time. Learning Objectives:   Analyze macro behavioral health trends on campus over the past decade, leading to correlated changes in student help-seeking behaviors and expectations of available support services on campus. Reflect upon participants’ campus strengths and growth edges with respect to mental health and wellness offerings. Evaluate the benefits of implementing a stepped-care model to decrease stigma, increase student engagement, and maximize available mental health and well-being resources to support student health and subsequent success. Analyze the benefits, as well as challenges, of offering evidence-based, inclusive, multiple-modality student support services on campus aimed at supporting mental health and well-being. Trainer Nathaan Demers, Psy.D., Director of Strategic Partnerships, Mantra Health Nathaan is a clinical psychologist with experience in a variety of clinical settings including community mental health, therapeutic boarding schools, integrated primary care, and most notably college counseling. In addition to his clinical work, he has implemented a variety of programs at the state/regional/national level, and completed his dissertation on the construct of “maturity” with adolescent and young adult populations. For the past decade, Nathaan has been a thought leader, national speaker, and innovator in the digital behavioral health space, specifically researching and developing holistic behavioral health interventions for institutions of higher education. Currently, Nathaan is the Director of Strategic Partnerships with Mantra Health, the preeminent digital mental health provider bringing accessible, high-quality mental health and wellness solutions to colleges and universities.
Published: January 25, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording Event Description The training will cover the following learning objectives: - Identify stigma around mental health. - Understand stigma as a barrier to early intervention among youth seeking mental health services. - Discuss causes and solutions to mental health stigma among adolescents. Trainer Bobbi Perkins Bobbi Perkins joined the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) in September 2021 as a Technical Expert Lead with the Rural Communities Opioid Response Program and as the Project Director for the Mountain Plain Rural Opioid Technical Assistance Center. Prior to joining WICHE, she worked at the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS), Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Division (BHDDD) since 2014. In this role, she represented MT as the Single State Authority (SSA) for substance use disorder continuum of care and was responsible for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grants and SAMHSA discretionary grants (Partnership for Success, State Opioid Response, FEMA Crisis Counseling, Pregnant and Post-Partum Women Pilot). Through this work she worked with partners and experts in the field to identify prevention, treatment and recovery support needs for individuals and families at risk for or struggling with substance, opioid, and stimulant use disorders. Collaboratively, she designed training and technical assistance to enhance access to evidence-based treatment across the behavioral health continuum. Bobbi has worked in the EMS, healthcare, and public health systems since 1995 and earned an undergraduate degree in Organizational Communication from Montana State University, a certificate in Public Health Management from the University of Washington, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in public health and public administration through the University of Montana.
Published: January 16, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The January 2024 issue features the third installment of the Counselor's Corner blog series: Integrating Spirituality and Counseling with African American Clients, information on the Opioid Response Network's 2022-2023 regional summits, and a call for applications for the upcoming HEART (Healing Ethno And Racial Trauma) Training for Behavioral Health Providers Serving Hispanic & Latinx Communities intensive training series. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: January 11, 2024
Print Media
In 2022, the MHTTC Network was asked to amplify and disseminate existing programming and resources related to school violence for the school mental health workforce (e.g., crisis intervention teaming, school violence trauma and grief response, cultural considerations for school violence), and develop responsive training and technical assistance to address additional needs identified. Through the MHTTC School Mental Health Initiative, we conducted an environmental scan and gap analysis, through which we aimed to 1) compile existing programming/resources on school violence, especially those developed by the MHTTCs and other SAMHSA-funded organizations; 2) identify the gaps that exist in school violence-related programming/resources available in the field; and 3) consider the development of new training, technical assistance activities, and/or resource(s) with a focus on addressing the gaps identified via the environmental scan and gap analysis. This summary highlights the findings from that work, including the free resources and resources lists, as well as organizations of interest that provide free resources, that were compiled through the environmental scan.
Published: December 15, 2023
Multimedia
This 3-part series provided a detailed understanding of trauma and the various types trauma individuals experience. Sessions explored the impact of secondary/vicarous trauma on corrections staff by examining the various ways exposure to traumatic events impacts the individual, the work they do, and the individuals they engage with on a daily basis. This series also explored what is needed to establish a trauma-informed organization, the impact of stigma and bias, and finished with the interplay of two groups of trauma survivors - corrections staff, inmates, and/or parole/probation supervisees - and strategies to mitigate or reduce trauma activation potential among staff and those they supervise for more successful overall outcomes.   Session 2 discussed the impact of dual trauma survivors (officers and inmates), understanding the power differential and toxic stress, and how trauma interplays between inmates and officers to increase the tension and challenges of life within jail or prison, as well as probation and parole. Explored strategies to shift the interactions between corrections deputies and parole/probation officers and the supervisees under their purview from adversarial to collaborative. Presenters: Emil Caron, and Steven Samra, MPA, C4 Innovations.   View a recording of this session here. 
Published: December 13, 2023
Multimedia
This event discussed the New England MHTTC's work assisting organizations with racial equity and efforts to make web-based content reflective of the mission & values of the organization. With intersectionality in mind, Ashley Stewart, Director of the Center for Health Equity informed attendees about the methods used to ensure inclusivity, cultural awareness, and attunement via a web auditing process.   The second part of the webinar series on December 12, 2023 covered: Assessment of the general tone and essence of a website related to engagement around equity, inclusion, and diversity. In addition to the use of intentional terminology, there is the need to assess how the terms are used, the stories they tell, the messages they imply, the depth or superficiality of the use of narrative or terms, and the broader impact on community engagement.
Published: December 13, 2023
Multimedia
This 3-part series provided a detailed understanding of trauma and the various types trauma individuals experience. Sessions explored the impact of secondary/vicarous trauma on corrections staff by examining the various ways exposure to traumatic events impacts the individual, the work they do, and the individuals they engage with on a daily basis. This series also explored what is needed to establish a trauma-informed organization, the impact of stigma and bias, and finished with the interplay of two groups of trauma survivors - corrections staff, inmates, and/or parole/probation supervisees - and strategies to mitigate or reduce trauma activation potential among staff and those they supervise for more successful overall outcomes.   Session 1 discussed mass incarceration and a “lay of the land” overview for justice-involved people of color. The subcultures of incarceration, urban and historical trauma and its relation to Trauma-Informed Corrections Care, and the impact on recidivism and recovery for reentering citizens were also discussed. Presenters: Steven Samra, MPA, C4 Innovations, and Daryl McGraw, MA, C4 Innovations.   View a recording of this session here. 
Published: December 11, 2023
Presentation Slides
A major concern in school communities across the country is school violence. This symposium provides an overview of the MHTTC Network's School Mental Health Initiative, and highlights training and technical assistance (TA) that the MHTTC Network is leading on addressing school violence and school mental health. NOTE: This was originally presented at the 2023 Advancing School Mental Health Conference, hosted by the National Center for School Mental Health in New Orleans, LA.
Published: December 8, 2023
Multimedia
The Embracing Authenticity: A Guide to Authenticity and Cultural Awareness at Work webinar series provided guidance and support for the use and implementation of the accompanying workbook, which is intended to be used as a guide for deeper levels of processing and to support healthier conversations in the workplace around identity and wellness. This resource can be used as a tool to address the unique experiences of work-related stress compounded with being a person of color and also as a resource for folks seeking to be more accountable for reducing harm and creating a more equitable work environment. This comprehensive guide is designed to support you in cultivating authenticity, promoting inclusion, and prioritizing wellness in the workplace. Whether you're an organizational leader, a colleague, or an individual who has experienced marginalization, this workbook provides practical insights, exercises, and resources to make meaningful progress. Presenters: Ashley Stewart, PhD, MSSW, LSW, Director of the Center for Health Equity, C4 Innovations Ronitia Hodges, Senior Project Manager, C4 Innovations
Published: December 8, 2023
Multimedia
The Embracing Authenticity: A Guide to Authenticity and Cultural Awareness at Work webinar series provided guidance and support for the use and implementation of the accompanying workbook, which is intended to be used as a guide for deeper levels of processing and to support healthier conversations in the workplace around identity and wellness. This resource can be used as a tool to address the unique experiences of work-related stress compounded with being a person of color and also as a resource for folks seeking to be more accountable for reducing harm and creating a more equitable work environment. This comprehensive guide is designed to support you in cultivating authenticity, promoting inclusion, and prioritizing wellness in the workplace. Whether you're an organizational leader, a colleague, or an individual who has experienced marginalization, this workbook provides practical insights, exercises, and resources to make meaningful progress. Presenters: Ashley Stewart, PhD, MSSW, LSW, Director of the Center for Health Equity, C4 Innovations Ronitia Hodges, Senior Project Manager, C4 Innovations
Published: December 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The December 2023 issue shares recorded content on wound care and xylazine, social media basics for preventionists, an infographic on providing behavioral healthcare to people living with HIV, and SAMHSA's tips for supporting your mental health through the holidays. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: December 7, 2023
Multimedia
This event discussed the New England MHTTC's work assisting organizations with racial equity and efforts to make web-based content reflective of the mission & values of the organization. With intersectionality in mind, Ashley Stewart, Director of the Center for Health Equity informed attendees about the methods used to ensure inclusivity, cultural awareness, and attunement via a web auditing process. The first part of the webinar series on December 5, 2023 covered: The inclusion of language addressing, responding to, and advocating around equity-related topics. C4 equity audits also assess for all forms of identity-based oppression, including, but not limited to, sexism, ageism, ableism, heterosexism, and linguistic and religious-based oppression.
Published: December 7, 2023
Multimedia
Series Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP is returning to lead our fall Mindful Monday series entitled, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice. The Mindful Monday series continues to be extremely popular as we explore different mindfulness practices, related to overall well-being, resilience, and mental health. According to studies conducted by the National Institute of Health (NIH), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, mindfulness practices may help people manage stress, cope better with serious illness, and reduce anxiety and depression.  Many people who practice mindfulness report an increased ability to relax, a greater enthusiasm for life and improved self-esteem. Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on October 9th and will run every other week through December 4th, 2023. This series of Mindful Monday sessions features a wide range of evidence-based practices from different disciplines and topics, including, sound healing, self-compassion, creativity, and setting boundaries. Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Dates October 9th - Sound Healing To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording October 23th - Grounding To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording November 6 - Creativity and the Inner Critic To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording November 20 - Self-Compassion HEAL Acronym To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording December 4 - Boundary Meditation To view resources from this session, click DOWNLOAD Click here to watch the recording Trainer Christina Ruggiero, RP
Published: December 4, 2023
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