Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our April newsletter spotlights Black Maternal Health week, Northwest MHTTC events, and other events & resources of interest to the workforce.
Published: April 8, 2024
Multimedia
To access resources from this session, click ATTACHMENT link Click here to watch the recording Event Description Overview: The workshop places a special emphasis on combating deficit thinking by encouraging participants to recognize and rectify assumptions, biases, and evaluations in their observations. By adopting a strengths-based approach, educators can contribute to a positive learning environment and promote equity. This workshop aims to empower education professionals with practical tools to enhance their observation skills, particularly in recognizing and addressing deficit thinking. The observation protocol provided will guide participants in unpacking their observations of students, encouraging a deeper understanding and awareness of assumptions before making recommendations to support student learning. Purpose: The purpose of this 90-minute workshop is to equip participants with the knowledge, skills, and strategies to conduct better observations by avoiding deficit thinking and fostering a strengths-based approach. By practicing objective description, participants will learn to recognize and challenge assumptions, leading to more informed and equitable observations. Why Training is Important: Training is crucial for education professionals to refine their observation skills, ensuring that the assessments made are fair, unbiased, and conducive to positive learning outcomes. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive observation protocol, helping them understand the importance of describing behaviors objectively and be mindful of where assumptions may influence interpretation and evaluation of students learning. What Training will Provide Participants: Skillsets: Objective detailing of observable behaviors. Differentiation between description, interpretation, and evaluation. Checking assumptions and biases during the observation process. Analysis of behaviors, considering alternative explanations.   Types of Resources Observation and Analysis Form for systematic recording and reflection. Guidelines for Distinguishing Description, Interpretation, and Evaluation. Practical steps on using the observation protocol effectively.   Learning Objectives: Participants will understand the concept of deficit thinking and how it can show up in learning observations (overt and nuanced ways) Participants will practice distinguishing between objective description, interpretation, and evaluation in their observations Learn One Approach for Implementing Systematic Observation and Analysis Trainer Alyson Kaneshiro, EdD Alyson Kaneshiro, Ed.D, is an educator based in the Bay Area. Currently serving as the Bay Area Regional SEED (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) Facilitator, she also holds the position of Associate Director of Learning Services at Urban School of San Francisco. Additionally, Alyson offers consulting and coaching services through her private practice, Learning Specialist LLC. Her extensive experience includes teaching as an adjunct professor in the Master of Arts Special Education Program at the University of San Francisco, conducting action research in Response to Intervention practices, and working in inclusive education and special education compliance at the Hawai’i Department of Education. With a rich educational background spanning 20 years, Alyson is passionate about designing equitable student support systems that prioritize relationships and compassionate care.
Published: April 5, 2024
Print Media
About this Resource: Given the large geographic area and diverse population of the Southeast region, the Southeast MHTTC recognizes that mental health priorities and training needs vary across providers, centers, communities, and states. With this context in mind, we assessed the mental health priorities of our region to inform our future TTA offerings. This infographic briefly outlines key findings from our assessment report that will guide the enhancement of our TTA offerings. For additional information, the full assessment report can be found here.
Published: April 4, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon!   Event Description Statistics reveal a concerning trend: a significant number of men who have died by suicide had visited a healthcare provider within 30 days prior to their death. This alarming fact underscores the urgent need for more effective mental health interventions and support systems within rural settings. This session aims to shed light on the critical intersection of masculinity, mental health, and rural life, and explore how everyday places—such as doctors' offices, churches, workplaces, and community gatherings—can become gateways to meaningful conversations and interventions. Key topics will include: Understanding the barriers to mental health support for rural men, including stigma, limited resources, and cultural norms. Strategies for healthcare providers to initiate mental health conversations and recognize warning signs during routine visits. The role of churches and faith-based organizations in providing support and breaking down the stigma associated with mental health issues. Integrating mental health awareness and support into workplaces, especially in industries predominant in rural areas. The importance of Integrated Behavioral Health positions in creating a holistic approach to health care in rural settings. Trainer Andrew Jordan Thayer, PhD, LP
Published: April 3, 2024
Multimedia
SMI Adviser is a 6-year initiative funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and administered by the American Psychiatric Association. SMI Adviser’s vision is to transform care for people who have serious mental illness so that they can live their best lives. To date, the website has been accessed over 1.9 million times and has been a resource for over 70,000 interdisciplinary learners.  In this presentation, we will provide clinicians a guide to the resources at SMI Adviser, with a focus on resources for working with individuals with early psychosis. We will also highlight resources that are found in our Centers of Excellence section, focusing on tools in the Clozapine and Long-Acting Injectable areas. We will also guide clinicians through our consultation service and share insights from the types of questions our users most commonly ask.   At the end of this presentation, participants were able to: Demonstrate knowledge of the available resources on SMI Adviser’s educational catalog and knowledge base. List and describe three tools in SMI Adviser’s Clozapine or Long-Acting Injectable Center of Excellence. Outline the process of accessing SMI Adviser’s consultation service, demonstrating the ability to effectively seek guidance to help make evidence-based treatment decisions. Presenters: Robert O. Cotes, MD, is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He serves as Physician Expert for SMI Adviser (www.smiadviser.org), which is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and administered by the American Psychiatric Association. SMI Adviser provides evidence-based resources to clinicians, individuals with serious mental illness, and their families. Sherin Khan, LCSW is Vice President of Operations and Strategy for Thresholds, Illinois’ oldest and largest provider of mental health services. Sherin also serves as the social work consultant as part of SMI Adviser, a SAMHSA funded clinical support system for people living with serious mental illness. She has over 10 years of experience in the non-profit sector with a focus on serving those who are disempowered. This webinar was co-hosted by the Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET, www.mapnet.online).
Published: April 2, 2024
Presentation Slides
Description: How did you learn about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery? What are the sources of information that shaped your views? This workshop will discuss how news, entertainment, and social media, as well as personal experience, influence how people understand substance use disorders and different pathways to recovery. It will also address common beliefs like, “You have to hit rock bottom” and “Recovery is rare,” and explain how attitudes, practices, and data collection have evolved. Information from the 2022 National Survey on Drug Use and Health and other sources will be presented, including prevalence of illicit substance use, substance use disorders, and co-occurring mental health challenges. Goals: Encourage participants to examine the sources of their attitudes and beliefs about substance use, addiction, treatment and recovery, reconsider any misperceptions, and expand their understanding of these topics by presenting current research and statistics. Workshop Outline: Discuss where participants learned about addiction, treatment and recovery (personal experience, news and entertainment media, etc.). Highlight themes that often appear in films, TV shows, books, music, and social media, including overview of research findings. Discuss critiques of media coverage of these topics. Address common beliefs and whether they’re supported by evidence (hitting rock bottom, enabling and co-dependency, tough love). Discuss how personal experience influences attitudes and beliefs. Present graphics illustrating types of substance use (experimental, social, risky, etc.). Discuss different reasons people use drugs, and how that varies for different substances over time. Present substance use and mental health statistics, using sources such as the 2022 NSDUH. Discuss criteria for diagnosing a substance use disorder (mild, moderate or severe). Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Session Recording:
Published: April 2, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This webinar will highlight key points from the “Supervising Clinical Mental Health Providers” guide published by the University of Washington’s CoLab for Community & Behavioral Health Policy and informed by both the research literature and experiences of community providers, behavioral health leaders, and systems partners. Quality supervision is paramount to quality mental health care. Clinical supervision for behavioral health providers has three primary aims: to develop competent clinicians, to support clinicians in their own experience of the work, and to promote safe and effective therapy, thereby ensuring client welfare. Clinical supervisors are ethically responsible for evaluating and ensuring clinicians are competent and do not pose risk of harm to the clients they are serving. This webinar and the referenced guide lead from the perspective that regardless of one’s supervision style or approach, all aspects of competent and ethical supervision are inherently trauma informed, intersectional, culturally responsive, and rooted in equity. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides Guide: “Supervising Clinical Mental Health Providers” Behavioral health needs of youth in WA state Black women talk about stereotypical transference enactments in cross-cultural supervision FACILITATORS Minu Ranna-Stewart, LICSW Minu Ranna-Stewart, LICSW has provided leadership and clinical oversight in multiple settings including an educational service district, accredited child advocacy center, community sexual assault program, and crime victim service center. She has provided training to mental health providers across Washington State on evidence based mental health treatment models for children and adults, participated in clinical research projects, delivered trauma and trauma informed trainings to the community, and provided direct clinical therapy services to children and adults. Minu is the co-founder of Milestone Behavioral Health Consulting where she proudly provide consultation to programs and organizations and direct services in the form of therapy services to children, adults, and families with a keen interest in treating race-based traumatic stress and ensuring race and identity are included as essential and necessary aspects of prevention, intervention, and therapeutic services. She is a certified TF-CBT therapist and supervisor. Naomi Leong, LMHC Naomi Leong, LMHC, is a registered yoga instructor, licensed Yoga Calm instructor, and a Certified Member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). Naomi also holds certifications in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sports and Fitness Psychology, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, and is a Child Mental Health Specialist. Naomi has a long history working in community mental health and is in private practice at Browne's Addition Wellness Center in Spokane, WA. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: April 1, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The first April issue of the Northwest MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events with NAMI Seattle, Tenant Law Center, and Rebekah Demirel; provides resources for April observances; and other events and resources of interest.
Published: April 1, 2024
Other, Print Media
These documents provide information about Peer Specialists in crisis settings, including general competencies for Peer Specialists in crisis work, Peer Run Warmlines, Peer Navigation, Crisis Respite programs, Mobile Crisis Units, and Crisis Stabilization Units. Subject Matter Experts were consulted on this project and are referenced within each document in quotes as well as recognized as contributors. The content provided in these documents is not exhaustive. Contributors provided expertise; their contribution does not imply endorsement nor does it imply opposition to the document.
Published: April 1, 2024
Multimedia
Raúl Condemarín shares culturally responsive strategies that he uses as a psychiatrist with host Lola Nedic. This podcast episode is sponsored by the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network (MHTTC).
Published: March 31, 2024
Multimedia
The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic.   Participants were able to: Define PCRP and its essential elements Increase familiarity with existing and emerging state and federal requirements regarding PCRP Articulate a minimum of three differences between traditional methods of treatment planning and best-practice PCRP Learn more about how the MHTTC PCRP Consultation Corner series can provide tools and resources to support the implementation of PCRP at your organization Presenters: Janis Tondora, Amy Pierce, and Amanda Bowman   Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   Amanda Bowman, LCSW-S, PSS (she/her) is a clinical social worker, certified peer specialist supervisor, and WRAPⓇ facilitator, using her professional and lived experience with mental health challenges to promote person-centered practices in behavioral health care. Coming from direct social work practice and administrative leadership within the public mental health system, she joined Via Hope in 2013, where she served as Recovery Institute Director until 2023. In this role, she oversaw the development and delivery of organizational change programs, which included statewide initiatives to support the implementation of person-centered planning, peer support services, and trauma-responsive work environments. As the owner of Sidecar Consulting, Amanda now facilitates collaborative learning events and serves as a subject matter expert for programs designed to support change within and across agencies. Outside of work, you may find Amanda with her family hiking the Barton Creek Greenbelt or enjoying live music.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs. More information about the series.  
Published: March 29, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Event Description We are excited to welcome back Alison Malmon, Founder and Executive Director of Active Minds, the nation’s premier nonprofit organization supporting mental health awareness and education for young adults, for a training that presents new insights about college mental health in 2024. While many people view the pandemic as something that has come and gone, college campuses across the country, particularly community colleges, are continuing to grapple with the ongoing, and in some cases accelerating, student mental health needs. Recent studies conducted on college campuses found that of the students interviewed, 60% of college students meet the criteria for at least one mental health condition, and 81% of students indicate that their mental health negatively impacted their academic performance in the past four weeks. Alison will present insights gathered from activities Active Minds hosts and coordinates with students on college campuses. These insights don’t necessarily dispute the statistics presented in the last paragraph but instead provide a clear picture of how effective mental health education, advocacy, and awareness are in changing the conversation around mental health, which in turn can positively impact statistics. In addition to the data Active Minds has collected, Alison will share some of the most innovative and effective approaches that Active Minds chapters use to support young adult well-being, particularly on college campuses. This training is for anyone who works with young adults and college-age youth. Trainer Alison Malmon Active Minds Founder & Executive Director
Published: March 28, 2024
Curriculum Package
The Healing & Power in Peer Support training provides an overview of Healing-Centered Engagement and its principles as ways to deepen and advance the practice of peer support. Participants will explore concepts like holding space, radical acceptance, meaning-making, and power dynamics through deep reflection, experiential activities, and facilitated discussion. This curriculum is helpful for new peer supporters or any peer supporters who are looking to refresh and deepen their skills. This curriculum should be facilitated by experienced peer specialists who are looking to support the peer support workforce in their community. Healing & Power in Peer Support is the prerequisite training for the Virtual Facilitation through a Healing-Centered Lens training, another curriculum created by the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center. Learning Objectives At the end of this training, participants will be able to: Integrate the principles of Healing-Centered Engagement in peer support practice; Practice radical acceptance in relation to self and others; Employ Healing-Centered techniques when facilitating difficult conversations in peer support groups; and Analyze power dynamics within interpersonal and group relationships to promote autonomy and self-determination. This curriculum package includes: a Facilitator Manual, participant handouts, and a training slide deck. For questions about the Healing & Power in Peer Support curriculum or how to implement this training in your community, please contact the South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center at [email protected].
Published: March 28, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
The Community Resiliency Model (CRM) is a skill-based wellness and prevention program that provides a biological, non-stigmatizing perspective on normal human reactions to stress and trauma. In this webinar we will apply CRM to schools by teaching skills for educators, administrators, and the school mental health workforce to reduce burnout and promote staff retention. Attendees will gain knowledge of concepts to understand stress responses in themselves and others as well as learn skills to help regain emotional balance after experiencing strong negative emotions. The knowledge and skills gained will help attendees avoid burn-out and promote cultures of resiliency in schools to better support student mental health.   Learning objectives: 1. Describe how stress and trauma affect mental and physical health. 2. Describe how CRM can protect and heal via sensory-motor awareness. 3. Explain the 6 CRM skills. 4. Understand how CRM can help reduce burnout and promote resiliency.
Published: March 27, 2024
Print Media
By adopting trauma-informed practices, schools can create environments that empower students, support healing, and break the cycle of bullying. This infographic illustrates the different approaches to address bullying in schools.
Published: March 26, 2024
Multimedia
  Additional resource: National School Mental Health Implementation Guidance Modules and Related Projects   Presented by: Jessica Christensen, M.Ed, holds a bachelor’s degree in Secondary English Education and a master’s in Education. With over a decade of middle school teaching experience, she moved from the classroom to the non-profit sector. Following the conclusion of Please Pass the Love in May 2023, she transitioned from Please Pass the Love to a full-time role at MHTTC. Jessica offers valuable insights to enhance mental well-being in education, empowering educators, and guiding districts to strengthen their mental health frameworks.    
Published: March 26, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This training is designed to help leaders prevent and address burnout in the Mountain Plains behavioral health workforce. Participants will learn about holistic integration of their physical, mental, and spiritual well-being to help improve engagement and presence in their leadership. By providing a space for facilitated group learning, reflection, and support, the goal is to identify opportunities for self-management and personal development and improve performance outcomes. After this training, participants will learn the following, Describe how attention to holistic wellness can reduce Behavioral health workforce burnout and impact on the lives of their communities. Learn ways to apply resilience and compassion as a part of their leadership style to nurture, promote, and cultivate healthier work environments. Develop increased self-awareness to recognize how strengths, aptitudes, and potential areas of growth can impact day-to-day functioning and work outcomes Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 26, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The final issue of the Northwest MHTTC March newsletter features new NW MHTTC webinars, a news update about our website, other events and resources.
Published: March 25, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This presentation will provide an overview of the Structural Competencies model, which was first articulated in the medical education literature and more recently has been proposed for a more culturally and structurally responsive approach of mental health. The five principles of structural competencies will be discussed, and examples provided of how the structural competencies approach differs from the multicultural competencies approach. Trainer Melanie Wilcox, PhD, ABPP Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology.
Published: March 25, 2024
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Sometimes mental health conditions can make maintaining a tenancy difficult. Things can get even more complicated when a housing voucher is involved and an incident results in the tenant facing the loss of not only their housing, but also the subsidy they rely on to help keep a roof over their head. This presentation will talk about the challenges many tenants face when balancing their mental health and a housing voucher, as well as an overview of what tools a tenant and their provider can use to help maintain housing stability. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  Slides HUD fact sheet, mental health Other Resources Washington State: Fair Housing Center of WA Human Rights Commission Overview of types of subsidies Northwest Hoarding Coalition Washington Law Help Washington Low Income Housing Alliance - want to get involved with WLIHA? Please email [email protected] King County Tenant Resource Line, open M-F (except holidays) from 9 AM to 1 PM: (206) 580-0762 Solid Ground classes: Webinars for tenants For any other questions, or to get in touch with the Tenant Law Center: Kacey Burton: [email protected] Elizabeth Powell: [email protected] FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation. Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: March 21, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or ADHD often experience areas of significant executive dysfunction, which can adversely impact their educational performance. In order for these students to meet with more success in school, they will likely require evidence-based intervention, specific to their areas of executive dysfunction, to be implemented. This presentation will help participants to gain a broad understanding of what executive functions are, and how areas of executive dysfunction can negatively impact a student in school if interventions are not in place to assist them. It will take a deeper look at the areas of executive dysfunction commonly associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD, and finally, it will discuss best practices (evidence-based interventions) to assist with the specific areas of executive dysfunction often found in students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD. After attending this session, participants will be able to: 1. Obtain a general understanding of what executive functions (EFs) are. 2. Be able to identify specific areas of executive dysfunction commonly associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD, and understand how they may adversely impact a student’s educational performance. 3. Gain an understanding of best practices (evidence-based interventions) to implement to assist students with Autism Spectrum Disorder or ADHD, specific to their areas of executive dysfunction. Trainer Amanda Garrett, Psy.D., NCSP Dr. Amanda Garrett is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist who has practiced School Psychology for the Department of Education (DOE) for over 16 years across New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Hawaiʻi. After earning her Ed.S. in School Psychology at Rider University (NJ), she continued on to obtain her doctorate in School Psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PA). Dr. Garrett’s doctoral program had an emphasis in School Neuropsychology, which became an area of passion for her. In addition to working for the DOE, Dr. Garrett spent three years as the Southeast Delegate on the executive board of the Association of School Psychologists of Pennsylvania (ASPP), and she is currently in her sixth year as an executive board member of the Hawaiʻi Association of School Psychologists (HASP), where she has served multiple positions, including Past President.
Published: March 21, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This training focuses on building collaboration and cultivating a culture of inclusivity where everyone feels valued and heard. By learning how to invest in meaningful relationships, participants will work to create a positive and sustainable impact on their workplace environment. The hope is that they will learn ways to identify common goals and interests and empower all members to be a part of the change-making process. Learning Objectives: - Identify opportunities for collaboration and person-centered engagement. - Develop openness towards different perspectives to create a culture of shared decision making. - Enhance communication to reduce misunderstanding and achieve identified goals. Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 21, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
About this Resource: The Southeast MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events and recently released products as well as shares information on available resources from SAMHSA and the MHTTC network. The March 2024 issue promotes Developmental Disabilities Month, Social Work Month, and Women's History Month. This issue also highlights our upcoming events and recently developed products, celebrates efforts being done by Region IV states, and provides resources available through the MHTTC Network and SAMHSA to connect individuals to needed treatment and support.
Published: March 19, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The third issue of our Northwest MHTTC newsletter features webinars on mental health topics such as clinical supervision, leadership, and service animals. It also highlights a call for presentations for the Re-Imagining Behavioral Health: Race, Equity & Social Justice Conference.
Published: March 18, 2024
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