Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
Recording of the event Reducing Stigma Toward the Transgender Community, originally held on March 7, 2024. View Slides
Published: March 14, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHEMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description In this presentation, we will explore the dual nature of diagnoses as both helpful tools in healthcare and limiting labels that can impact self-perception and societal perception. We will examine the limitations of defining oneself or someone solely by a diagnosis and emphasize the importance of embracing a multifaceted identity. By recognizing the complexity and diversity of individuals' experiences, strengths, and aspirations, the goal is to empower individuals to advocate for themselves and others in matters related to mental health and well-being. Ultimately, we want to promote a broader understanding of identity that goes beyond labels and diagnoses, fostering a more inclusive and supportive environment for all. Trainer LaVonne Fox Peltier Dr. LaVonne Fox Peltier serves as a Research Assistant Professor within the Bureau of Evaluation & Research Service, situated in the Department of Education, Health, and Behavioral Studies at the University of North Dakota. A member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa reservation, she remains deeply connected to her roots. Drawing from her extensive background, she has dedicated her expertise to working with children, youth, and young adults facing mental health challenges both in rural and urban areas as well as within mental health facilities. Dr. Fox Peltier is particularly passionate about developing culturally rooted interventions inspired by Indigenous practices to address mental health issues. In her work, she emphasizes the importance of adopting strength-based approaches, advocating for alternatives to the commonly employed deficit-based practices. She is committed to bridging cultural understanding and mental health care for Indigenous peoples.
Published: March 14, 2024
Multimedia
Discover the transformative power of trauma-informed care in our Trauma-Informed Care Basics promotional video.
Published: March 14, 2024
Multimedia
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more and register for upcoming events in the series here. Becoming - The Journey of a Change Agent  Description: In part II of the series, participants will describe the value of belonging in their own self-awareness journey to creating transformative educational systems. What role will they play in the work of creating belonging for every learner? How will they create spaces in their roles to disrupt disproportionate outcomes for students and improve school climate? Ultimately, how can we create and support change agents in education? Objective: This session will offer strategies and considerations for ensuring newly recruited and current staff have empowerment to shift their climates.   About the Presenter: Nikole Y. Hollins-Sims, Ed.D. Technical Assistance Coordinator for the Midwest PBIS Network Nikole Y. Hollins-Sims, Ed.D.,is the senior educational consultant & strategist for Hollins-Sims Consultation. She formerly served as a technical assistance coordinator for the Midwest PBIS network and is a former Special Assistant to the Secretary of Education at the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). Dr. Hollins-Sims has been awarded as a Moral and Courageous Leader for Education by Cabrini University in 2021, the 2021 American Psychology Association (APA) Anti-Racism School Psychology Emerging Professional Award and was named the 2021 Pennsylvania School Psychologist of the Year. One of her career highlights is serving as the lead author of the book titled: Creating Equitable Practices in PBIS.     Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: March 12, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Download Session Slides Here This session is designed for local education agencies/school districts engaged in school mental health initiatives that provide students and families service referrals. The information will also be relevant to state education agencies seeking to advance policies and procedures that ensure a full spectrum of services are accessible to meet student and family wellness needs.   Learning Objectives Participants who join this session will be able to: 1. Understand and articulate the value of ongoing investment in effective school mental health referral pathways. 2. Leverage best practices to build and refine pathways linking schools, providers, students, and families to support student mental health. 3. Select and apply easy-to-implement tools and templates that improve school mental health referral pathways.   Session overview What level of need warrants referral to an outside provider? Does your team have a communication procedure for a student’s supported re-entry to campus? Are the school mental health providers you work with timely in their intake of students after they have received a referral? This session outlines the benefits off effective school mental health referral pathways. After reviewing best practices, you will be able to improve the consistency and efficiency with which your students are connected to appropriate levels of mental health support. Given the dynamic nature of schools and service agencies, establishing and maintaining good methods of contact and tracking requires regular attention. This session will also provide tools and templates to strengthen your referral pathways, and it will explain how these tools and templates can be adapted to the circumstances and culture of your school system.
Published: March 12, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Event Description This workshop will focus on learning how to demonstrate awareness of diversity, equity, and inclusion in service provision through strategies such as cultural humility. Participants will learn to acknowledge and improve responsiveness about decisions, actions, and policies that are shaped by their personal cultural perspective. The goal is for participants to develop an orientation and active engagement towards transitioning to more open and understanding healing environments while improving client engagement. Learning Objectives: Learn ways to validate the experience of others while identifying your own “blind spots” to increase empathy for those we serve. Acknowledge the need for cultural awareness and understanding, through self-reflection to create change and more supportive healing environments. Develop the ability to reframe interactions with others as one of collaborative equals. Trainer Lamarr Lewis Lamarr Lewis, is a dedicated advocate, author, and agent of change. With a focus on community-based mental and public health, he works with diverse groups including individuals living with psychiatric disabilities, people in recovery from substance abuse, and at-hope youth (He does not use the term at-risk). He is an alumnus of Wittenberg University graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with minors in Africana Studies and Religion. He later received his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Argosy University. His career spans over twenty years with experience as a therapist, consultant, public speaker, facilitator, trainer, and human service professional. He has been a featured expert for such organizations as; Boeing, Region IV Public Health Training Center, Fulton County Probate Court, Mississippi Department of Health, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and many more. His lifelong mission is to leave the world better than how he found it.
Published: March 12, 2024
Print Media
About this Resource: Given the large geographic area and diverse population of the Southeast region, the Southeast MHTTC recognizes that mental health priorities and training needs vary across providers, centers, communities, and states. With this context in mind, we assessed the mental health priorities of our region to inform our future TTA offerings. We focused on the ways in which we could further align the expertise and capacity of the Southeast MHTTC with the priorities and TTA needs of the providers and leaders in the Region IV States. This report outlines key findings from our assessment that will guide the enhancement of our TTA offerings and expand upon the reach of our current work.
Published: March 12, 2024
Multimedia
Hosts Joey Rodriguez and Lola Nedic discuss culturally responsive strategies and the future of culturally responsive care. This podcast episode is sponsored by the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network (MHTTC).
Published: March 11, 2024
Multimedia
Access the Recording of this Training Here The purpose of this presentation is to help Mental Health and Substance Use providers as well as the Recovery Community at large better understand the potential support needs of people with IDD with or without co-occurring Mental Health and/or Substance Use Challenges that they interact with either socially, academically, and/or professionally by providing examples of potential support needs and methods that can be used to help address support needs.  Learning Objectives:  By the end of the presentation attendees will be able to:  Define Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  Identify different potential support needs of people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities including vital support needs around Sensory Processing Disorders like Tactile Dysfunction and Proprioceptive Dysfunction  Execute a more trauma informed and person-centered approach to interacting with persons with Proprioceptive Dysfunction and/or Tactile Dysfunction About the Presenter:  Jordan Smelley is a Mental Health Peer Support Specialist in Texas and a person in long-term recovery from Intellectual and Developmental Differences with Co-occurring Mental Health challenges. Jordan partly defines his own recovery in relation to the opportunities available to present and educate the community on topics around supporting persons with IDD.  Jordan was awarded the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Texas Chapter’s Empowerment Award for Excellence in Promotion of Self-Advocacy at its 47th Annual Convention on November 16, 2023, in recognition of Jordan’s Self-Advocacy efforts around expanding supports available to persons with Intellectual and/or Developmental Differences.
Published: March 11, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The second issue of our Northwest MHTTC March newsletter highlights the 2024 Integrated Care Conference, our new podcast episode, and other events and resources of interest. View the new issue.
Published: March 11, 2024
Multimedia
    Session 1 - March 11 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to view the recording Session 2 - March 25 To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Session 3 - April 15 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 4 - April 22 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 5 - May 6 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Session 6 - May 20 Resources coming soon! Recording coming soon! Series Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP, is returning to lead our first Mindful Monday series, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice, for Spring 2024. Join us as we continue to explore and experience different mindfulness practices related to the topics of creativity, rest, and self-care. This series is for anyone who desires to improve their overall well-being, resilience, and mental health.  The practices that are presented in the training are designed for quick and effective implementation both personally and professionally.  For mental and behavioral health practitioners these techniques can be easily incorporate into their practice.  Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” Attendees who have participated in past Mindful Monday series have the following to say about the training: “Incredibly validating experience”, “Love doing this- can we do it indefinitely”, “Thank you for this training. It is hard to recognize we also deserve to be heard, have needs/wants and slow down and breathe for a while.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on March 11th and will run every other week through May 20th, 2024.  Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Trainer Christina Ruggiero Master’s Counselling Psychology  Registered Psychotherapist 
Published: March 11, 2024
Print Media
The New England MHTTC’s area of focus is the resilience and recovery of persons (and their loved ones) at risk for, living with or recovering from mental health challenges. During the reporting period, we continued to support and enhance the region’s capacity to provide equity-focused, recovery-oriented care across several dimensions. Our training and technical assistance (T/TA) explicitly aim to help promote recovery-oriented behavioral health systems of care and to move these systems beyond an acute care model to better meet the needs of persons with prolonged mental illness or substance use disorders (Davidson et al., 2021). A central aspect of recovery-oriented systems of care is the inclusion of people with lived experience at all levels of partnership–from service users, families, and direct peer support service providers to clinicians, managers, and administrators. Our T/TA aims to honor and promote those with lived experience in all our activities. The content and process of our work is grounded in our Guiding Principles on Resilience and Recovery. Consistent with these principles, we take an equity-minded approach to recovery-oriented care which recognizes that even the most progressive treatment systems exist within a social context where people of color and other historically marginalized groups often experience—both individually and collectively—an additional layer of trauma that has devastating consequences on their health and well-being. We are committed to proactively advancing social justice and racial equity as an essential component of recovery-oriented systems transformation across the New England region.
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia
At the end of this presentation, participants were able to: Recognize the importance of understanding the historical context of the lives of older African Americans Recognize the importance of eliciting the older African American’s perspective of his/her mental and physical health challenges Elicit socio-cultural and spiritual beliefs that could influence an older African American’s health care choices and access to care Enhance knowledge of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of major mental health disorders when working with older African Americans   Presenter: Martha Crowler, PhD   This webinar was presented in collaboration with the Massachusetts Mental Health Center GrandRounds series.
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia
The one-hour Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance virtual series provides an opportunity for participants to: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health, and Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.   February's topic was "Native Crisis Response (Part Two) – Escalation and De-escalation and Native Implications."
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia
This webinar provided tips for working with families of individuals with psychosis in outpatient community settings. Questions that were addressed include:   How can I develop a good working relationship with families in order to support care even though I don’t have a lot of experience working with families and I have a large caseload? How can I manage confidentiality? How can I help families develop a better understanding of their relative and their symptoms and treatment? What are some important considerations for providing culturally responsive care when working with families? What can I learn to feel more equipped to support families entering care in the context of a recent onset of psychotic symptoms?   Presenter: Julie M. McCarthy, PhD, is a clinician-scientist in the Division of Psychotic Disorders at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. Her research aims to identify neurobiological and psychosocial treatment targets and develop/evaluate treatments for individuals and families experiencing co-occurring psychotic and substance use disorders.
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Participants will be able to define a school-wide crisis and an individual student emergency, understand incident management guidelines at each phase, and identify possible barriers to school emergency responses in order to positively engage leadership/staff during an emergency.
Published: March 7, 2024
Multimedia
Recording for the National Center for School Mental Health led event Understanding and Preventing Youth Suicide, originally held on February 13, 2024. Slide presentation
Published: March 6, 2024
Multimedia
March 6 (Session 1) To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording March 7 (Session 2) To view resources from this training, please click ATTACHMENT links Click here to watch the recording Series Description Implicit bias is insidious in nature; we all have them. Many of these biases are formed through inaccurate information, such as stereotypes, the patterns established by oppressive systems, and even by internalized oppression. Since implicit biases operate outside our conscious control, they can be harmful yet unrecognized barriers to collective liberation and to our individual wellbeing. This interactive workshop will cover concepts and strategies for participants to heal from bias and systemic racism in order to better live our values on an individual and systemic level. We will engage in various forms of mindful and contemplative practices and spend time strategizing to embed them into our lives to support our collective healing. Due to time constraints in this workshop, we will not be covering foundational concepts of DEI in these sessions. We will focus on practices to mitigate bias and to interrupt it in others. Therefore, participants must already have a baseline understanding of implicit bias, systemic oppression, social identities, intersectionality, systemic privilege and marginalization, and equity. Learning Objectives: Participants will delve deeper into how implicit bias is formed, how to recognize and redress it in one’s self, and practice talk moves to support them in addressing others’ biases. Participants will explore how to address microaggressions and strategies to scale up their response in order to establish a culture of belonging for every student, family, and staff. Participants will have an open frame to explore the culmination of their learning, delve into resources to continue their work in this topic, and examine scenarios to authentically push their theoretical understanding of implicit bias into praxis. Trainer Dr. Rana Razzaque Dr. Rana Razzaque’s commitment to improving opportunity, access, and inclusion for all children has driven her educational and professional journey. This commitment has deepened over time due to her own lived experiences and the continuous learning she seeks out on a variety of topics related to equity and inclusion, the persistent disparities for marginalized communities, and the deep need to build understanding and empathy through courageous conversations with people from multiple perspectives. Rana was born in Bangladesh, raised in Maryland, spent her adolescence in Texas, and spent a couple of years in Arizona before moving to Denver in 2011. In the warmer months, you might find Rana hiking with her husband, Rob, and her dog Eeyore. She also loves reading (especially fiction and poetry), trying out new recipes to cook, going to concerts, boxing, and indoor rock climbing (even though she is afraid of heights). Rana received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Literature from the University of Texas at Austin and Arizona State University, respectively, and focused her thesis research on the impact of literary influence on colonizing South Asia in the 17th century. In 2017, she earned her Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Denver and focused her dissertation research on how mindfulness influences the culturally responsive practices of educators. Rana has served as Social Emotional Learning Partner in Denver Public Schools, Program Development Coordinator with Sources of Strength, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Specialist at Jeffco Public Schools, and is now the Director of Opportunity, Access, and Inclusion at Englewood Schools in Colorado. Her work intersects culturally responsive and sustaining practices with social-emotional learning and transformative educational leadership. Rana’s mission is to ensure that youth and educators have an intentional focus on honoring diverse cultures and identities, utilizing challenges as opportunities to build resilience, and holistically supporting themselves and others to equitably reach their highest potential.
Published: March 6, 2024
Multimedia
​VIEW WEBINAR RECORDING ABOUT THIS RESOURCE White Trauma: Creating space for white people’s vulnerability with the hopes of undoing the perpetuation of structural/systemic racism. Racism, at its most basic level, is a lens though which people interpret, naturalize, and reproduce inequality. We all struggle to truly see one another due to the conditioning and trauma that has been imposed upon us, which becomes the breeding ground for implicit bias and racial disconnection. This is one of the factors that makes it so difficult for us, as mental health professionals, to have real conversations about things that matter; things that heal. Racism is not a “white” issue it is a systematic/structural issue designed to keep in place white cultural dominance. This system has caused harm to us all.  All of us have biases and they go where we go--in our homes, workspace, schools, community etc. It is critical for space to be created for white people to be able to acknowledge and address their own trauma, without shame or guilt, so true racial healing and mental health healing can begin. If the trauma in white bodies is not healed, then it will be passed on to the next generation and continue the cycle. What is in us will come out, unintentionally or intentionally, because The Body Keeps the Score. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Resources  White Trauma Slides Race Baiting 101 Video White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo,PhD Project Implicit - IAT Implicit Association Tests Fire in the Ashes by Jonathan Kozol The Pain We Carry - Healing from Complex PTSD for People of Color by Natalie Y. Gutiérrez, LMFT Caste by Isabel Wilkerson A Space for Us - A Guide for Leading Black, Indigenous, and People of Color Affinity Groups by Michelle Cassandra Johnson Why People of Color Need Spaces Without White People by Kelsey Blackwell   FACILITATOR Sherronda Jamerson, MA, SUDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement ​
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT link Click here to watch the recording Event Description This didactic lecture will review the conceptual basis and empiric evidence linking firearm access to suicide risk and provide clinicians with basic knowledge, language, and strategies to facilitate secure firearm storage solutions among patients identified as having elevated suicide risk. Trainer Joe Simonetti Joe Simonetti is a clinician investigator with the VA Rocky Mountain MIRECC for Suicide Prevention and Director of Mentorship and Education for the Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative at the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine. His research focuses on developing patient-centered firearm injury prevention interventions for individuals at risk of suicide. As an educator, he works locally and nationally to support VA and community-based clinicians in delivering evidence-based and culturally informed counseling interventions.
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: This is the on-demand recording from part 1 of our 4-part series that introduces participants to the tenets of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and guides them from the introductory stage to applied practice with different mental health conditions and scenarios. Participants learn and practice strategies from each tenet of ACT ranging from brief interventions to more in-depth processes. The first session introduces the complete ACT framework and ACT hexaflex and provides an overarching discussion of the goals of this psychotherapy orientation. Similarities and differences with other orientations are discussed to contextualize the ACT perspective. This session also introduces the area of Creative Hopelessness and begins the discussion around case conceptualization. Resources for ongoing learning are shared.
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource:  This on-demand recording is from the 2nd session in our 4-part series "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): From Introduction to Applied Practice." Throughout the series, participants are introduced to the tenets of ACT and guided from the introductory stage to applied practice with different mental health conditions and scenarios. Participants learn and practice strategies from each tenet of ACT ranging from brief interventions to more in-depth processes. The second session focuses on Values and Committed Action in the ACT framework. Rationale, underlying processes, and strategies for practice are discussed with an opportunity for experiential practice.
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource:  This on-demand recording is from the 3rd session in our 4-part series "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): From Introduction to Applied Practice." Throughout the series, participants are introduced to the tenets of ACT and guided from the introductory stage to applied practice with different mental health conditions and scenarios. Participants learn and practice strategies from each tenet of ACT ranging from brief interventions to more in-depth processes. The third session focuses on Present Moment Awareness and Self as Context in the ACT framework. Rationale, underlying processes, and strategies for practice are discussed.
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource:  This on-demand recording is from the final session in our 4-part series "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): From Introduction to Applied Practice." Throughout the series, participants are introduced to the tenets of ACT and guided from the introductory stage to applied practice with different mental health conditions and scenarios. Participants learn and practice strategies from each tenet of ACT ranging from brief interventions to more in-depth processes. The final session focuses on Acceptance and Defusion in the ACT framework. Rationale, underlying processes, and strategies for practice are discussed.
Published: March 5, 2024
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