Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
About this Resource: The Southeast MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events and recently released products as well as shares information on available resources from SAMHSA and the MHTTC network.  The November 2022 issue recognizes Native American Heritage Month, highlights our upcoming events, celebrates efforts being done by Region IV states, and provides resources available through the MHTTC Network and SAMHSA to connect individuals to needed treatment and support. 
Published: November 8, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The November issue of Northwest News provides information on Native American Heritage Month, National Family Caregivers Month, Veterans Day, and other observances throughout the month. We also include information on an upcoming MHTTC webinar titled Intersectionality of the Transitioning Veteran, upcoming SAMHSA and partner events, online courses, free resources, and our latest podcast episode on Social Justice and Inclusion.
Published: November 7, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The October issue of Northwest News provides information on Mental Illness Awareness Week, Substance Abuse Prevention Month, and other observances throughout the month. We also include information on upcoming MHTTC, SAMHSA and partner events, a new online course, free resources, and a survey for providers using telehealth in behavioral health services.
Published: October 5, 2022
Toolkit
This is toolkit accompanies the Cultural Competence and Community Inclusion webinar. Watch the webinar and view the presentation here.  
Published: August 11, 2022
Multimedia
Description: In this webinar we will discuss ways to integrate cultural competence and community inclusion into the services that are provided by your organization. Oftentimes, services are delivered to communities, with little attention to integrate their cultural practices and community norms. When communities are not responsive to the services that are being offered, it leads to a disconnect between those providing the service and those expected to receive them.  This webinar will present creative ways to engage community members by integrating their cultural practices into the services that are being offered.   Objectives:  Identify the community norms and cultural practices of those you serve. Develop an outreach and implementation plan utilizing the cultural practices of your community for the delivery of services. Identify strategies for incorporating cultural values and norms when collaboratively providing evidence-based practices.   Presented By:  Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, as well as in schools, communities, and other integrated care locations with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities.   Belinda Hinojos, Ph.D., received her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in counseling psychology from the University of Kansas. She completed her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is a staff psychologist and training director with Morningstar. In this role, she provides mental health services to American Indian communities in Nebraska. This includes outreach and services to the Little Priest Tribal College and the Nebraska Indian Community College. Dr. Hinojos previously held the position of training director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s (UNL) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Throughout her career, Dr. Hinojos has focused on increasing access to quality mental health services for people of color. She began her work at UNL-CAPS as the Diversity Coordinator and Latinx Outreach Specialist. Prior to starting her doctoral program, Dr. Hinojos worked at a community mental health agency in Kansas City providing mental health services to the Latinx community. She is an active member of the National Latinx Psychological Association. She currently serves on the Standing Committee on Diversity through the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies, in addition to the Training Advisory Committee for the Minority Fellowship Program through the American Psychological Association. Learn more about this series: Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities  
Published: August 8, 2022
Print Media
This is a comprehensive document that includes mental health resources specifically for Native and Indigenous people. It includes resources for crisis support, general and specific mental health needs, therapist locators, and mental health facts and information, as well as resources for awareness, education, and mental health practitioners.
Published: July 29, 2022
Multimedia
The South Southwest MHTTC hosted the State Spotlight Series: Native American Peer Recovery and the Value of Connection on July 28 from 1:30-2:30 CST. Lyndi Seabolt and Casey Ward-Freeman facilitated this session on how the recovery process is unique for Native Americans and the importance of culture in peer services. It explored the history of Native peer support and the progress of peer programs in Oklahoma. This session highlighted the importance of the culture, connection, and decolonization by examining The Indian Country Peer Recovery Specialist ECHO program (Peer ECHO). A sample Peer ECHO case presentation was discussed during this presentation.  
Published: July 29, 2022
Multimedia
July 26, 2022 The United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and the New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance, a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held throughout 2022 on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length that will provide an opportunity for participants to:  Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health,  Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and  Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens.    In addition, the concept of Native psychological brilliance will be highlighted through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.    Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. 
Published: July 26, 2022
Multimedia
This training was held on June 28th, 2022, from 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. MT/1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT. Access resources by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description This presentation will discuss the neuroscience of trauma and how trauma impacts development in childhood. Attendees will learn how trauma manifests in problems with behavior, emotions and addictions. This presentation will highlight indigenous wisdom in understanding and healing trauma.   Learning Objectives Learn how trauma impacts development.   Understand neuroplasticity and its role in changing behavior  Identify trauma related reactions  Learn how to respond to individuals with trauma in a manner that facilitates healing  Recognize Indigenous practices as valuable interventions for traumatized individuals  Trainer Tami De Coteau                     Dr. DeCoteau obtained a doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology in 2003 from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with specialization in the cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders for adults, adolescents and children.    Dr. De Coteau is a Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) practitioner. TBRI is a therapeutic model that trains caregivers to provide effective support for at-risk children. She is also trained in various other trauma treatment modalities including EMDR, EFT, somatic processing, attachment intervention, NMT (neurosequential model of therapeutics), and TF-CBT. Dr. De Coteau has extensive experience working with patients who suffer from complex trauma, neurodevelopmental disorders, grief, anxiety, depression, and suicidal thinking.    Dr. DeCoteau has worked in a variety of outpatient settings and with a diverse patient population, including Veterans and Native Americans. She received the Indian Health Service 2009 Health Professional of the Year Award for outstanding service and the American Psychological Foundation 2010 Early Career Award for providing culturally competent practice techniques for Native Americans and for developing training programs in rural, underserved areas. Dr. DeCoteau was appointed by a member of the U.S. congress to serve the Commission on Native Children to help address the challenges faced by Native children.    Aside from clinical work, Dr. DeCoteau has given numerous lectures on how trauma impacts attachment and brain development, in-school strategies for working with traumatized children, and historical trauma. She is an enrolled member of the American Psychological Association, an enrolled member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation and a descendant of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa.
Published: June 28, 2022
Multimedia
June 28, 2022   The United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and the New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance, a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held throughout 2022 on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length that will provide an opportunity for participants to:  Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health,  Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and  Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens.    In addition, the concept of Native psychological brilliance will be highlighted through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.    Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. 
Published: June 28, 2022
Multimedia
May 26, 2022 Using data to drive decision-making is critical to ensuring that behavioral health services improve the lives of all people, no matter their race, background, or circumstance. During the Using Data for Equity webinar on Thursday, May 26, our partners at Third Sector shared a five-step process of using data to operationalize equity. Check out the video archive and make plans to extend your learning at the connected Diversity Talk on June 14 at 1:00 p.m., ET. To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/WS_afNwJgbE   Presenter(s): Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. Third Sector is a national nonprofit technical assistance organization that advises government agencies on ways to reshape their policies, systems, and services toward better outcomes for all people no matter their race, background, and circumstances.  
Published: May 26, 2022
Multimedia
May 24, 2022 The United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and the New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance, a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. This no-cost telehealth series will be held throughout 2022 on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length that will provide an opportunity for participants to:  Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health,  Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and  Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens.    In addition, the concept of Native psychological brilliance will be highlighted through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.    Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. 
Published: May 24, 2022
Multimedia
Description: This webinar will provide an explanation of cultural competency along with the strengths and challenges of implementation. Participants will develop an understanding of both professional and consumer experiences of cultural competency within the workplace.   Learning Objectives Describe cultural competence including the challenges encountered in the workplace. Discuss strategies to incorporate cultural competence and diversity in healthcare to deliver effective quality care for all patients. Identify strengths of cultural competence in your workplace and how the team provides successful patient centered care.   Download the Toolkit: Cultural Competence Toolkit Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities  
Published: May 9, 2022
Presentation Slides
  Watch the webinar.    Description: This webinar will provide an explanation of cultural competency along with the strengths and challenges of implementation. Participants will develop an understanding of both professional and consumer experiences of cultural competency within the workplace.   Learning Objectives Describe cultural competence including the challenges encountered in the workplace.  Discuss strategies to incorporate cultural competence and diversity in healthcare to deliver effective quality care for all patients. Identify strengths of cultural competence in your workplace and how the team provides successful patient centered care.    Download the Toolkit: Cultural Competence Toolkit   Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities
Published: May 9, 2022
Multimedia
April 26, 2022  
Published: April 26, 2022
Print Media
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This document addresses the disparities in mental health care for Native populations in rural areas and how cultural elements can improve mental health care delivery. It was developed in conjunction with the "Cultural Elements of Native Mental Health with a Focus on Rural Issues" webinar held on March 15, 2022. View the recorded webinar and other related resources here.     Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: April 20, 2022
Multimedia
April 5, 2022 To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/aSMdXmDRzus   Presenter:  Miraj U. Desai, PhD - Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Yale. 
Published: April 5, 2022
Multimedia
March 22, 2022 This webinar focused on the impact of western world view on Native American Behavioral Health standards.
Published: March 22, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Improving mental health care for Native people in rural areas is the focus of this 90-minute webinar presented by the National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC in collaboration with the Northwest MHTTC. The disparities between urban and rural areas in mental health care are well-documented. Native populations in rural areas suffer even more from these disparities, but cultural elements can improve mental health for Native people living in rural areas. Facilitator Raymond Daw, MA, Diné (Navajo), addresses the following learning objectives: Provide an overview of rural mental health disparities in the United States Provide an overview of Native American mental health disparities Describe Native American cultural elements for improved rural mental health This webinar is most relevant to those who: currently work with Native/Tribal communities OR work some with Native/Tribal clients OR want to learn more about Native/Tribal issues ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation and Summary Presentation slides Bibliography & Resources Cited in Presentation What is Rural America? - The United States Census Bureau The Future of Rural Behavioral Health, a policy brief by the National Rural Health Association Urban Indian Health Program: Fact Sheets Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), CDC: Suicide Trends Among and Within Urbanization Levels by Sex, Race/Ethnicity, Age Group, and Mechanism of Death — United States, 2001–2015 Surveillance Summaries / October 6, 2017 / 66(18); 1-16.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.ss6618a1 Honoring Children, Mending the Circle. Childhood Trauma in Indian Country. Presentation by Dolores Subia Bigfoot, PhD, Presidential Professor, director of the Indian Country Child Trauma Center within the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Overcoming Adverse Childhood Experiences, from the Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, a project of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIP) 61: Behavioral Health Services for American Indians and Alaska Natives, a SAMHSA publication Integrating Spirituality into Treatment: Resources for Practitioners by William R. Miller, PhD, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Decolonizing Mental Health  Decolonizing Mental Health. This series examines the transformative work of therapists and individuals of color, and calls for a redefining how we define psychiatric illness and health. Through 20 profiles, the digital series discusses what a more responsive mental health care system should look like. Historical Trauma Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart: Historical Trauma in Native American Populations (video) Indian Health Service webinar archives; topics include historical trauma Prevention Culture-Based Prevention Resources Good Medicine Bundle, from Operation Prevention. Use the wisdom of Native practices of wellness combined with the insights of modern science to help Native and non-Native students avoid the dangers of substance misuse. Tribal Opioid Response Resources, from the National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Suicide Prevention Native and Strong. Native and Strong is designed to inform and educate tribal communities about suicide prevention. This campaign is funded by the Washington State Department of Health. For 24/7 support, call (800) 273-8255 or text NATIVE to 741741. Transforming Tribal Communities: Indigenous Perspectives on Suicide Prevention, from Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). Organizations The Native Center for Behavioral Health is a research center at the University of Iowa College of Public Health committed to developing programs to support the behavioral health workforce in Native American and Alaska Native communities across the country. The National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC works with organizations and treatment practitioners involved in the delivery of mental health services to American Indian and Alaska Native individuals, families, and tribal and urban Indian communities to strengthen their capacity to deliver effective evidence-based and experience-based practices. This includes the full continuum of services spanning mental illness, prevention, treatment, and recovery support. The National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC provides education and training opportunities for individuals and groups involved in providing substance abuse treatment and counseling, including health professionals in primary prevention and treatment for substance abuse. The center offers services nationwide for consulting, technical assistance, and continuing education seminars. The National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center provides training and technical assistance services to the substance abuse prevention field including professionals, para-professionals, organizations and others in the prevention community focused on American Indian and Alaska Native communities. FACILITATOR Raymond Daw, MA, Navajo Nation Mr. Daw is a member of the Navajo Nation and is bilingual in Navajo and English. He is a trainer and web designer for the Takini Institute on the historical trauma intervention model, and he formerly worked as the Administrator of Behavioral Health at the Yukon-Kuskokwim Healthcare Corporation in Bethel, Alaska. During his tenure as Executive Director of Na’nizhoozhi Center, Inc. (NCI), he participated in research with the NIDA Clinical Trials Network through the University of New Mexico. NCI was recognized as a model and innovative program for AI/AN substance abuse treatment.
Published: March 17, 2022
Multimedia
Learning Objectives: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health,  Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and  Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens.    In addition, the concept of Native psychological brilliance will be highlighted through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series. 
Published: February 22, 2022
Multimedia
The dual public health emergencies of structural racism and the coronavirus pandemic continue to challenge communities of color across New England. The 2022 Innovations Conference will highlight providers implementing groundbreaking mental health and substance use programming amidst these crises to support resilience and recovery. Join thought leaders from our region to celebrate innovative approaches to supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery by and for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) across New England. Presenters will share successes, lessons learned, and strategies for supporting whole-person care and recovery during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.   Day 4 - February 17, 2022: Pathways of Recovery - Innovations in Supporting Recovery, Resilience, Purpose, and Opportunities   To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/9bwLxqeBHuY.  
Published: February 17, 2022
Multimedia
The dual public health emergencies of structural racism and the coronavirus pandemic continue to challenge communities of color across New England. The 2022 Innovations Conference will highlight providers implementing groundbreaking mental health and substance use programming amidst these crises to support resilience and recovery. Join thought leaders from our region to celebrate innovative approaches to supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery by and for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) across New England. Presenters will share successes, lessons learned, and strategies for supporting whole-person care and recovery during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.   Day 3 - February 16, 2022: Pathways of Recovery - Innovations in Engagement, Connection, and Programming   To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/IH1oGBeDRjo.   
Published: February 16, 2022
Multimedia
The dual public health emergencies of structural racism and the coronavirus pandemic continue to challenge communities of color across New England. The 2022 Innovations Conference will highlight providers implementing groundbreaking mental health and substance use programming amidst these crises to support resilience and recovery. Join thought leaders from our region to celebrate innovative approaches to supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery by and for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) across New England. Presenters will share successes, lessons learned, and strategies for supporting whole-person care and recovery during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.   Day 2 - February 15, 2022: Innovative Prevention Approaches   To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/SsPoBzgFHE0.  
Published: February 15, 2022
Multimedia
The dual public health emergencies of structural racism and the coronavirus pandemic continue to challenge communities of color across New England. The 2022 Innovations Conference will highlight providers implementing groundbreaking mental health and substance use programming amidst these crises to support resilience and recovery. Join thought leaders from our region to celebrate innovative approaches to supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery by and for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) across New England. Presenters will share successes, lessons learned, and strategies for supporting whole-person care and recovery during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.   Day 1 - February 14, 2022: Laying the Groundwork- Foundations of Whole Person Care   To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/ALVqdlNqivc    
Published: February 14, 2022
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