Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
Join our value-added Diversity Talk! At this session, we will unpack information shared during our January 26 session on the impact of implicit bias on BIPOC Populations. Session collaborator, Jessica Isom, MD, MPH, will lead our talk and introduce a six-step framework for reducing disparities and fostering health equity. In preparation for this session, please review the video archive from our January 26 session and review the curated discussion resource, A Roadmap to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care.   watch our recording here: https://youtu.be/V0Jpn84VgbE   Our Diversity Talks offer a window of availability with thought leaders and provide the space and opportunity for small group conversations and discussions around curated resources that promote racial equity and culturally humble practices in behavioral health and recovery-oriented care.
Published: February 10, 2022
Multimedia
Objectives: Discuss suicide prevalence rates in tribal communities Identify suicide prevention strategies and programs for tribal communities Identify interventions to use when a member of the community is experiencing suicidal ideation Discuss culturally appropriate strategies to implement after a suicide occurs   Speakers: Patricia Cerda-Lizarraga, Ph.D., graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a double major in Cognitive Psychology and Spanish Language and Culture. She moved to the Midwest where she completed her Masters degree and doctoral degree in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Patricia previously worked as a staff psychologist at UNL where she provided individual and group therapy to college students. Patricia was the diversity coordinator at Counseling and Psychological Services at UNL and has a passion to work with issues of diversity and with people of color. She recently came on board at Morningstar to work with the American Indian population in Nebraska and expand her training in working with children and families. Dr. Patty was born and raised in Southern California. Together with her two young boys and her husband they have made Lincoln, Nebraska their home. Dr. Patty enjoys family time and taking trips to California and Mexico.   Dr. Katie Doud, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist, attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she completed her Bachelor of Psychology, and received her Master’s in Counseling Psychology. She completed her PhD in Counseling Psychology from Loyola University-Chicago. She works providing mental health services to the American Indian communities in Nebraska. Her previous experiences include; psychologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln college counseling center, a local private practice, Cook County Hospital and a pediatric developmental center in Chicago, domestic violence shelter and sexual assault and domestic violence crisis center. Katie’s areas of practice include working with individuals from diverse backgrounds, children, trauma, crisis management, survivors of interpersonal violence and sexual assault, family of origin issues, anxiety, depression and grief. Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities  
Published: February 8, 2022
Presentation Slides
Watch the webinar.   Objectives: Discuss suicide prevalence rates in tribal communities  Identify suicide prevention strategies and programs for tribal communities  Identify interventions to use when a member of the community is experiencing suicidal ideation  Discuss culturally appropriate strategies to implement after a suicide occurs    Speakers:   Patricia Cerda-Lizarraga, Ph.D., graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a double major in Cognitive Psychology and Spanish Language and Culture. She moved to the Midwest where she completed her Masters degree and doctoral degree in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Patricia previously worked as a staff psychologist at UNL where she provided individual and group therapy to college students. Patricia was the diversity coordinator at Counseling and Psychological Services at UNL and has a passion to work with issues of diversity and with people of color. She recently came on board at Morningstar to work with the American Indian population in Nebraska and expand her training in working with children and families. Dr. Patty was born and raised in Southern California. Together with her two young boys and her husband they have made Lincoln, Nebraska their home. Dr. Patty enjoys family time and taking trips to California and Mexico.     Dr. Katie Doud, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist, attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she completed her Bachelor of Psychology, and received her Master’s in Counseling Psychology. She completed her PhD in Counseling Psychology from Loyola University-Chicago. She works providing mental health services to the American Indian communities in Nebraska. Her previous experiences include; psychologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln college counseling center, a local private practice, Cook County Hospital and a pediatric developmental center in Chicago, domestic violence shelter and sexual assault and domestic violence crisis center. Katie’s areas of practice include working with individuals from diverse backgrounds, children, trauma, crisis management, survivors of interpersonal violence and sexual assault, family of origin issues, anxiety, depression and grief.    Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities    
Published: February 8, 2022
Multimedia
Bias and racism in health care impede scientific advancement, reduces the pipeline of diverse clinicians, and contributes to racial and ethnic health disparities. Learn how to advocate for proactive approaches that eliminate barriers impacting people of color, promote racial equity, and advance cultural humility.   To watch the recording, please go to: https://youtu.be/RxzrB2K-A3k. Other resources coming soon!   Presenter: Dr. Jessica Isom, MD, MPH
Published: January 26, 2022
Multimedia
Learning Objectives: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health,  Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and  Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens.    In addition, the concept of Native psychological brilliance will be highlighted through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series. View recordings of these events and register for future events.
Published: January 25, 2022
Multimedia
While the statistics help to validate that the rates of mental health disorders are similar across racial groups, they also conceal a deeper inequity. What you can’t tell from the numbers is how the severity, persistence, contributing factors, and implications for the overall well-being of mental health conditions vary widely across demographic groups. Join us for a review of the stats and a discussion around ways to support the behavioral health needs of BIPOC individuals and communities.   To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/B51mS5hpxRs   Presenter(s): Mary Roary, PhD Taylor Bryan Turner Jessica Isom, MD, MPH Maria E. Restrepo-Toro Ingrid Padgett Timothy Jean
Published: December 15, 2021
Toolkit
This booklet gives teachers hands-on activities and learning opportunities to help your classroom better understand and appreciate Native American culture, both during Native American Heritage Month, or throughout the year! 
Published: November 20, 2021
Print Media
Although the United States of America recognizes November as Native American Heritage Month, we acknowledge along with our people across Indian country that our heritage is to be honored every day. Our Native peoples’ traditions, culture, and contributions exceed what any history book has ever documented. Our story has many beginnings with the various creation stories told among our tribes. Our story continues over hundreds of years of facing abuse and neglect. Our story remains one of time-honored traditions and a strong culture. Our story permeates all aspects of life today in the United States of America. Our purpose is to stay resilient and keep our culture alive!
Published: November 20, 2021
Multimedia
  Young people with intersecting LGBTQ+ A and BIPOC identities are incredibly resilient. At the same time, they face enormous stress related to the COVID 19 pandemic, racism, and discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation. While many LGBTQ+A BIPOC youth and young adults find support and connection amongst their peers, or through family, including families of choice, or communities grounded in faith, activism, or other shared interests and values, others struggle with isolation. Those who seek mental health treatment often face barriers such as a shortage of practitioners with relevant expertise, mistrust of the healthcare system, and inadequate insurance coverage. Many also experience logistical challenges related to transportation, scheduling, lack of privacy, and little access to technology required for successful telehealth engagement. Please join us and the LGBTQ+ Behavioral Health Equity Center of Excellence for an interactive conversation about the resilience of BIPOC LGBTQ+A young people, and explore how providers, practitioners, caregivers, and other adults can help these youth navigate challenges and thrive.    
Published: November 16, 2021
Multimedia
Objectives: Identify the unique challenges encountered by college students from tribal communities Discuss the importance of mental health and health equity related to students attending a tribal college Develop outreach efforts including counseling services to support the mental health of students attending tribal colleges Identify strategies to support the mental health needs of faculty and staff at tribal colleges   Speakers: Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, as well as in schools, communities, and other integrated care locations with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities.   Belinda Hinojos, Ph.D., received her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in counseling psychology from the University of Kansas. She completed her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is a staff psychologist and training director with Morningstar. In this role, she provides mental health services to American Indian communities in Nebraska. This includes outreach and services to the Little Priest Tribal College and the Nebraska Indian Community College. Dr. Hinojos previously held the position of training director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s (UNL) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Throughout her career, Dr. Hinojos has focused on increasing access to quality mental health services for people of color. She began her work at UNL-CAPS as the Diversity Coordinator and Latinx Outreach Specialist. Prior to starting her doctoral program, Dr. Hinojos worked at a community mental health agency in Kansas City providing mental health services to the Latinx community. She is an active member of the National Latinx Psychological Association. She currently serves on the Standing Committee on Diversity through the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies, in addition to the Training Advisory Committee for the Minority Fellowship Program through the American Psychological Association. Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities  
Published: November 6, 2021
Presentation Slides
Watch the webinar.   Objectives: Identify the unique challenges encountered by college students from tribal communities Discuss the importance of mental health and health equity related to students attending a tribal college Develop outreach efforts including counseling services to support the mental health of students attending tribal colleges Identify strategies to support the mental health needs of faculty and staff at tribal colleges   Speakers: Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, as well as in schools, communities, and other integrated care locations with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities.   Belinda Hinojos, Ph.D., received her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in counseling psychology from the University of Kansas. She completed her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is a staff psychologist and training director with Morningstar. In this role, she provides mental health services to American Indian communities in Nebraska. This includes outreach and services to the Little Priest Tribal College and the Nebraska Indian Community College. Dr. Hinojos previously held the position of training director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s (UNL) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Throughout her career, Dr. Hinojos has focused on increasing access to quality mental health services for people of color. She began her work at UNL-CAPS as the Diversity Coordinator and Latinx Outreach Specialist. Prior to starting her doctoral program, Dr. Hinojos worked at a community mental health agency in Kansas City providing mental health services to the Latinx community. She is an active member of the National Latinx Psychological Association. She currently serves on the Standing Committee on Diversity through the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies, in addition to the Training Advisory Committee for the Minority Fellowship Program through the American Psychological Association.   Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities
Published: November 6, 2021
Multimedia
This video shares information on traumas and risk of suicide among Native American youth, as well as resources for getting help.
Published: November 4, 2021
Toolkit
This handout complements Supporting the Mental Health Needs of Students Attending Tribal Colleges, part of the webinar series Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities.  
Published: November 3, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
Electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  The November 2021 issue features the Counselor's Corner blog series, new products from SAMHSA, and a complete calendar of events. 
Published: November 2, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
About this Resource:  The Southeast MHTTC Newsletter highlights upcoming events and recently released products as well as shares information on available resources from SAMHSA and the MHTTC network.  The November 2021 issue raises awareness of several national events (including Native American Heritage month), highlights Southeast MHTTC upcoming events and recent products, and provides resources available to connect individuals to needed treatment and support. 
Published: November 1, 2021
Print Media
The K-12 Program created fact sheets for both Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) to educate individuals on the data surrounding SMI and SED in Native populations and to share best practices for working with Native peoples living with SMI and Native children and youth with SED. Both of the fact sheets can be downloaded above.    
Published: October 29, 2021
Multimedia
    Resources shared: Sky World Nurse Practitioners are Human Too Dream Feat Native Wellness Institute      
Published: October 28, 2021
Print Media
Please enjoy this report which gives a review of the National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC's Year 3.
Published: October 27, 2021
Print Media
The annual Red Ribbon Week is a week-long campaign to support and promote a drug-free life. This week is a great opportunity to raise awareness and promote strength and resilience in your students and community. The National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC has designed the following resources for you to use: Red Ribbon Week Flyer: Celebrate Native style with the individual and school-wide activities provided in this Red Ribbon Week Flyer! Red Ribbon Week Pledge Poster: Have students take a pledge to stay drug free! Personalize the poster below with your school's name by opening the PDF and typing directly into the shaded box.
Published: October 22, 2021
Multimedia
The purpose of the sessions is to support tribal health care providers, and non-tribal health care providers who serve tribal people, in today’s critical environment. Trauma, stress, fear, and anxiety touches health care workers, just as it is felt by the patient or person you are helping. Longer hours and extra shifts, and the deep concern for family and patients, can weigh heavy on us as we continue to do our jobs. Our goal is to continue the supportive environment we enjoyed last month; where we remembered our strengths and learned new ways to renew during the most stressful of times, enriched by a series of Native music videos.   To watch the recording, click here.   Other Resources: National Day of Rememberance for U.S. Indian Boarding Schools Sky World - performed by Teio Swathe Home to Me - Grassy Narrows Native Quarantine Dance Native Wellness Institute  
Published: September 30, 2021
Print Media
The National American Indian and Alaska Native School Mental Health Program would like to share with you this fact sheet which includes data on suicide rates among Native people, as well as helpful resources on programs that are raising awareness and reducing risk among Indigenous nations. Please take a few moments to explore this document. It is available at the link below to download.
Published: September 23, 2021
Multimedia
  The purpose of the sessions is to support tribal health care providers, and non-tribal health care providers who serve tribal people, in today’s critical environment. Trauma, stress, fear, and anxiety touches health care workers, just as it is felt by the patient or person you are helping. Longer hours and extra shifts, and the deep concern for family and patients, can weigh heavy on us as we continue to do our jobs. Our goal is to continue the supportive environment we enjoyed last month; where we remembered our strengths and learned new ways to renew during the most stressful of times, enriched by a series of Native music videos.   To watch the recording, click here.   Other resources: Nakoa Heavy Runner - Warriors Prayer  Twin Flames - Human Tunchai Redvers - "You Matter" Spoken Word Poem 9 Terms to Avoid in Communications with Indigenous Peoples  
Published: August 26, 2021
Multimedia
Native people define spirituality as central to their culture and traditions. Spirituality, culture, and healing ceremonies not only reinforce the core beliefs of tribal life but also restore personal balance when life stressors threaten to overwhelm. The COVID-19 pandemic added enormous anxiety and fear into many tribal communities. Tribal health care providers needed to assume expanded and urgent responsibilities, and physical isolation of tribal community members meant that they were cut off from their traditional gatherings, dances, and ceremonies. Many tribal families lost relatives and friends to COVID-19, or other tragedies, which brought new levels of grief to our communities. We are now beginning to see light at the end of the pandemic tunnel and many Native people are taking stock of the past 15 months of physical separation and emotional strain. This discussion with Native spiritual and cultural leaders provides an opportunity to applaud the bravery of our health care providers and community members, and to discuss how Native spirituality can support our ability to regain our health and balance. For many, Native spirituality can be a potential antidote that minimizes the consequences of anxiety, fear, depression, and other stresses caused during the coronavirus crisis.   To watch the recording, click here.    Other Resources: Introductory Tribal Video: “Why” Native Dads Network Terry Cross/NICWA podcast (Jan. 11, 2021): Intentional Resilience White Bison Wellbriety Native Wellness Institute Native American Music Awards   Moderator:  Holly Echo-Hawk, Pawnee Nation, Tribal Behavioral Health SME, New England MHTTC   Presenters: Chief Mutáwi Mutáhash (Many Hearts),  Dr. Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba, Mohegan Tribe Jennifer ‘Healing Waters’ Harding, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Tribal Council Member Mike Duncan, Maidu/ Wailaki / Wintun and Western Band Shoshone
Published: July 29, 2021
Multimedia
Healthcare workers with all levels of education and training provide essential care and support to our New England population. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, this workforce has worked harder and longer to ensure that we were able to access healthcare services, often putting their physical and mental health and well-being on the line. Now, after more than a year of working during this ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease and managing their own personal challenges, healthcare providers are experiencing high levels of stress, vicarious trauma, emotional exhaustion, compassion fatigue, and burnout. This added burden puts them at risk for stress-related medical problems, mental conditions, and substance misuse, as well as increased risk for leaving their profession altogether. The pandemic has disproportionately affected Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) employees and their families, who are also experiencing racial inequality in the workplace and society. On July 28, the second webinar in our series will feature presenters that recognized the struggles faced by their BIPOC employees and colleagues during COVID-19 and took steps to address their needs proactively. Our presenters will discuss emerging and best practices specific to creating equitable supports that promote the well-being of BIPOC employees.   Event moderated by: Daryl McGraw, MS, Senior Manager of Racial Justice and Equity, C4 Innovations   Presenter(s): 1) Machiste L. Rankin was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and raised in Providence, R.I.  The youngest of seven, Machiste's father is a career U.S. Navy veteran, and his mother was a homemaker who sadly lost her battle with cancer in 1993.  Machiste attended school in the City of Providence Public School System.  A former State of R.I. Correctional Officer (13 years of service), and graduate of Bristol Community College (degree in Criminal Justice and certificate of Law Enforcement) and member of Phi Theta Kappa, he now acts as the Chairman of the Advocacy Committee for RICares (Rhode Island Communities for Addiction and Recovery Efforts), Community Engagement Coordinator, and Outreach Specialist.  He is also a former Acting Chairman, Vice-Chairman, and current member of The Providence External Review Authority. He is the father of two incredible children who inspire his every deed.  Lastly, he is a man in long-term recovery from Alcohol Use Disorder.    2) Regina P. Wilson, PhD completed her Master’s Degree and Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Connecticut.  She has been licensed by the State of Connecticut since 2000.  Dr. Wilson has been in private practice for the past 17 years but she has over 25 years of clinical work experience. In her professional career, Dr. Wilson has worked in variety of settings including child guidance, and inpatient and outpatient psychiatric facilities.  She has also provided clinical and administrative supervisor for clinical graduate students at the University of Connecticut, Department of Psychology Mental Health Clinic.   Her therapeutic approach is a more integrative, dynamic and holistic approach that involves a partnership with her clients to utilize their strengths and assets in meeting their therapeutic goals using evidence-based treatment modalities.  She tends to utilize a variety of techniques including but not limited to Trauma-informed treatment approaches, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Solution Focused, Psychoeducation, Behavior Modification, and Dialectic Behavioral Therapy.  While Dr. Wilson has worked with a multitude of clinical issues and diverse populations, she has specialty in the areas of trauma, sexual abuse, and domestic violence.   Besides psychotherapy, she also conducts psychological evaluations.  In addition, she is trained in EMDR. Dr. Wilson is also a board member and Vice President of the CT BIPOC Mental Health & Wellness Initiative where she has conducted numerous psychoeducational and healing forums for the BIPOC community.   In addition, she is a Level 2, Reiki healer who seeks to bridge energy healing with psychotherapy.  Dr. Wilson has sought to expand her knowledge of alternative healing practices through trainings on Shamanism, involvement in Indigenous practices such as sweat lodges, and sound healing.     
Published: July 28, 2021
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