Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
  This presentation provides an introduction to the assessment and treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Access slide deck used during this presentation by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description It will include general information about the diagnosis, common symptoms that parents may raise during office visits, and tools to help providers with diagnosis. The session will also outline the current gold-standard treatment options, with particular focus on the behavioral strategies that are effective in treating symptoms of ADHD. Trainer Andrea Temkin-Yu, Psy.D. Andrea Temkin-Yu, Psy.D., is an Attending Psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine. She is a licensed psychologist with expertise in cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety, depression, attention-deficit, and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and related conditions. She offers individual and group therapy for children, teens, and young adults. She is a certified therapist in Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and offers therapy and groups for parents of youth exhibiting mood or behavioral difficulties. Dr. Temkin-Yu is a member of the Youth Anxiety Center at Weill Cornell Medicine where she participates in clinical care and research focused on youth and young adult populations. Her research has centered on ways to improve accessibility of services provided to parents and families, as well as the use of evidence-based practices across disorders.
Published: October 11, 2022
Multimedia
  Suicide among LGBTQ+ people is rampant. Help spread awareness on this critical topic. To access the slide deck used in this presentation, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description People who identify as LGBTQ+ have higher rates of both suicide attempts and suicidal ideation. LGBTQ+ youth, in particular, have seen significant increases in suicide attempts in the recent years, often aligning with the passing of discriminatory laws or policies. While LGBTQ+ people share many risk factors and clinical needs with heterosexual or cisgender peers, the development and implementation of preventative care and interventions should also address the additional minority stressors facing this community.   This webinar will provide an overview of the critical risk and protective factors, considerations for risk assessment, and intervention strategies specific to LGBTQ+ people. Trainer Keri Frantell   Dr. Keri A. Frantell (she/her/hers) is a licensed psychologist working with university counseling students. She earned her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Tennessee. Her integrated program of practice, research, teaching, and advocacy centers on multiculturalism and social justice. In both research and clinical practice, she has extensive experience working with suicidality and LGBTQ+ populations. She has published on factors related to transgender suicidal ideation and attempts, bisexual oppression and the impact on mental and physical health, and the connection between religiosity and suicidality for LGB young adults. 
Published: September 19, 2022
Multimedia
   Suicide is a growing problem in America's rural communities. Learn more during this one-hour webinar.  To access the slide deck from this presentation, please click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description Suicide has been identified as a serious public health issue that has significant impacts on families and communities. According to the Center for Disease Control suicide rates have increased with nearly 46,000 deaths by suicide in 2020 thus being the 12th leading cause of death in the United States. According to SAMHSA in the year 2020 1.2 million individuals attempted suicide. Individuals who reside in rural and agricultural communities experience higher than average rates of suicide. This webinar will address the issue of suicide in rural and agricultural communities as well as identifying strategies for suicide prevention and postvention intervention. Learning Objectives At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:  Identify the prevalence of suicide in rural communities  Describe conditions and risk/protective factors that contribute to suicide rates in rural communities  Identify successful suicide prevention approaches  Define postvention and identify strategies that can assist individuals, families, rural communities heal following a suicide loss  Trainer Ken Flanagan                       Dr. Kenneth Flanagan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. He currently serves as a curriculum developer for the Mountain Plains Mental Health and Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.  Dr. Flanagan holds a license as a clinical social worker and provides counseling and behavioral management services with a clinical focus on depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues, and chronic pain. He received his MSW and Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Dr. Flanagan has held a range of clinical and administrative positions in healthcare and community-based organizations.  
Published: September 6, 2022
Multimedia
To access resources used during this event, please click DOWNLOAD above Recording coming soon! Event Description Change is a constant in the work setting – developing new services, adapting to new requirements, responding to environmental issues like COVID, and conducting ongoing program improvement all create pressures to adapt. In this training, you will learn how to prepare yourself and your team for change. We’ll also talk about attitudes towards change, leadership qualities that facilitate change, crucial needs for effective transformation, strategic planning, and tools to support the change processes.    Ms. Gina Brimner and Mr. Robert Dare led this seminar. Ms. Brimner and Mr. Dare have extensive leadership experience in their respective fields, Behavioral Health, and the United States military.  They have facilitated the Mountain Plains MHTTC Leadership Academy for the past two years. Trainers Gina Brimner Robert Dare
Published: August 9, 2022
Multimedia
  This event was part of our ongoing Workshop Wednesday series.  To access slide deck, click on DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description Clinical training around suicide most often emphasizes intervention efforts and prevention skills, but rarely includes information about how to manage the aftermath of a death by suicide. This webinar will focus on how to develop and implement plans for postvention, or what to do in the aftermath of a death by suicide. Our discussion will emphasize creating a plan, designating key tasks and assigning roles, how to effectively (and with less stigma) communicate about suicide, and how to transition from postvention back to prevention.   Trainer Keri Frantell, PhD Dr. Keri A. Frantell (she/her/hers) is licensed psychologist working with university counseling students. She earned her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Tennessee. Her integrated program of practice, research, teaching, and advocacy centers on multiculturalism and social justice. In both research and clinical practice, she has extensive experience working with suicidality and LGBTQ+ populations. She has published on factors related to transgender suicidal ideation and attempts, bisexual oppression and the impact on mental and physical health, and the connection between religiosity and suicidality for LGB young adults.
Published: July 20, 2022
Print Media
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This document addresses the culture of homelessness and the impact of mental illness upon unhoused individuals with an eye towards strategies and tips to provide person-centered, trauma-informed, strengths-based and culturally appropriate services and supports. It was developed in conjunction with the "Homelessness and Mental Health: Impacts and Strategies for Effective Care" webinar held on April 19, 2022. View the recorded webinar and other related resources here.     Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: July 19, 2022
Multimedia
See each session below to access resources. Event Description This 4-part series is designed for the first responder community including law enforcement, parole, and probation personnel, EMTs, and any other members of the community engaged in emergency and front-line efforts.     The series kicks off with a 90-minute foundational introduction to Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). In this session, participants will learn what TBI is, its common signs and symptoms, how it can occur, and why conventional intervention methods often don't work with individuals living with TBI. We encourage all participants to attend the first session, it will establish a baseline of understanding for all participants as we move thru the series.    This training series will provide participants with tips and strategies for first responders who may encounter individuals living with a history of brain injury when responding to calls in the community. People living with brain injury have higher rates of mental health conditions and problematic use of substances and are often overrepresented among vulnerable populations. First responders may encounter individuals and their family members affected by brain injury when responding to crisis situations such as individuals expressing suicidal ideation and intent, those who are homeless, victims and perpetrators of intimate partner violence, and justice-involved individuals. Participants will become familiar with common clues of a history of brain injury and strategies to engage with individuals and deescalate as needed when encountering those living with this often-hidden disability.    Training Series Dates (participants must register for each session):    June 9th - Introduction - Kick-Off 10:00 am MST - 11:30 am MST  To access slide deck and associated resources, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   June 16th: Intensive Workshop 1 for Law Enforcement and EMT Personnel 9:00 am MST - 10:00 am MST  To access slide deck and associated resources, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Intensive Workshop 2 for Probation and Parole Personnel 1:00 pm MST - 2:00 pm MST  To access slide deck and associated resources, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   July 14th: Wrap-Up Panel  10:00 am MST - 11:30 am MST  To access slide deck and associated resources, click DOWNLOAD above Learning Objectives Attendees will be able to describe at least 3 common brain injury-related impairments  Attendees will be able to identify three signs that an individual may have a history of brain injury  Attendees will learn 3 strategies to safely engage with and redirect individuals living with a history of brain injury  Trainer Anastasia Edmonston, MS, CRC    
Published: July 14, 2022
Multimedia
This one-hour conference session discusses training and technical assistance for the rural mental health/behavioral health workforce. ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Speakers: Christina Clayton, LICSW, CDP, Co-Director, Northwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Dr. Phillip Hawley, Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic Stephanie Hoffman, Family Support Partners & Training  Slides from this session The Northwest Rural Health Conference brings together rural healthcare professionals and subject matter experts from the field to collaborate, educate, and brainstorm innovative ways to bring quality care to our rural communities. Through collaboration of the Washington State Department of Health State Office of Rural Health, the WWAMI AHEC Programs, the Washington Rural Health Association and the Rural Health Clinic Association of Washington this annual conference brings together a consortium of rural healthcare professionals from around the region to provide an experience that expands professional knowledge, promotes partnership, and explores the new and emerging opportunities to advance rural health. Learn more about the 2022 conference.
Published: June 15, 2022
Multimedia
To access slide deck, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording This event was held on May 25th, 2022 from 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. MT/12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. CT.  Event Description May is Maternal Mental Health Awareness month.  As many as 1 in 5 new mothers experience some type of perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMADs). These illnesses frequently go unnoticed and untreated, often with long-term consequences to both mother and child.  No one is immune to experiencing PMADS. Women of every culture, age, income level and race can develop perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Symptoms can appear any time during pregnancy and the first 12 months after childbirth. There are effective and well-researched treatment options available to help women recover, but stigma often prevents women from seeking help.     Join us this month as we offer two 1-hour training sessions that address sensitive topics that are often missed in the perinatal mental health conversation: Grief and Loss, and Birth Trauma.    Learning Objectives: ·      Define birth trauma and related experiences during the perinatal period  ·      Recognize symptoms and  screening tools for birth trauma and PTSD  ·      Examine effective ways to support individuals who have experienced trauma during birth  Trainer Marianela Rodriguez-Reynaldo  Marianela Rodriguez-Reynaldo is a mother, postpartum doula, Certified Lactation Educator and Clinical Psychologist specialized in Perinatal Mental Health. She completed her Master’s degree at Xavier University in Ohio and went on to complete her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the Carlos Albizu University in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has been a PSI Coordinator in Puerto Rico since 2009, has a private practice and led a monthly support group for parents who have experienced perinatal loss for 11 years. She is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal infant care. Provides training on perinatal mental health and trauma for health and birth professionals, is part of the expert panel for the Observatory of Obstetric Violence in Puerto Rico and serves as a Psychology Consultant for the Puerto Rico Health Department, Mother, Child and Adolescent Division (Title V). In 2020 she co-founded the first Center for Perinatal Mental Health in Puerto Rico that focuses on research, awareness, and service for this population. 
Published: May 25, 2022
Multimedia
May 25, 2022 The U.S. is facing a national mental health crisis among youth due to the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Rural communities face unique challenges and barriers developing treatment and recovery options, which can lead to increased rates of mental illness. This webinar features experts who will address challenges faced in reducing barriers to mental health services in rural communities and share innovative ideas for bringing mental health services to youth. They will also address how social connections are crucial to eliminate the red tape and establish mental health services in these areas.   Panelists:  Alicia Casey-McCall, Research Associate, Community Health Systems Development at Georgia Health Policy Center Sean Perry, Founder, We R H.O.P.E. Shea Haury, Executive Director, ComWell
Published: May 25, 2022
Multimedia
To view slide deck, click DOWNLOAD above Recording coming soon! This event was held on May 17th, 2022 from 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. MT/12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. CT.  Event Description May is Maternal Mental Health Awareness month.  As many as 1 in 5 new mothers experience some type of perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMADs). These illnesses frequently go unnoticed and untreated, often with long-term consequences to both mother and child.  No one is immune to experiencing PMADS. Women of every culture, age, income level and race can develop perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Symptoms can appear any time during pregnancy and the first 12 months after childbirth. There are effective and well-researched treatment options available to help women recover, but stigma often prevents women from seeking help.     Join us this month as we offer two 1-hour training sessions that address sensitive topics that are often missed in the perinatal mental health conversation: Grief and Loss, and Birth Trauma.    Learning Objectives: ·      Identify key concepts related to perinatal loss  ·      Consider the impact of grief and loss during the perinatal period  ·      Examine effective ways to support individuals who have experienced perinatal loss  Trainer Marianela Rodriguez-Reynaldo  Marianela Rodriguez-Reynaldo is a mother, postpartum doula, Certified Lactation Educator and Clinical Psychologist specialized in Perinatal Mental Health. She completed her Master’s degree at Xavier University in Ohio and went on to complete her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the Carlos Albizu University in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has been a PSI Coordinator in Puerto Rico since 2009, has a private practice and led a monthly support group for parents who have experienced perinatal loss for 11 years. She is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal infant care. Provides training on perinatal mental health and trauma for health and birth professionals, is part of the expert panel for the Observatory of Obstetric Violence in Puerto Rico and serves as a Psychology Consultant for the Puerto Rico Health Department, Mother, Child and Adolescent Division (Title V). In 2020 she co-founded the first Center for Perinatal Mental Health in Puerto Rico that focuses on research, awareness, and service for this population. 
Published: May 17, 2022
Print Media
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This document addresses the disparities in mental health care for Native populations in rural areas and how cultural elements can improve mental health care delivery. It was developed in conjunction with the "Cultural Elements of Native Mental Health with a Focus on Rural Issues" webinar held on March 15, 2022. View the recorded webinar and other related resources here.     Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: April 20, 2022
Multimedia
Innovative Recruitment Strategies for Behavioral Health Careers   Description:  Join us to learn about best practices involving retention efforts within the behavioral health workforce. This webinar discusses recruitment strategies that are essential to enhance behavioral health pathways for a successful career while addressing the shortage of this specialty in rural communities.  Many resources will be explored to assist with recruitment of behavioral health students in rural communities through academic training programs, rural partnerships to collaborate on common goals, and support networks through residences, internships, and practicum placements within a community. Discussion will explore the options available for students to engage within student advisory boards, the BHECN app, and other engagement opportunities in the effort to maintain and strengthen the rural behavioral health care workforce throughout the states.   Learning Objectives: Discuss the importance of retention within the behavioral health workforce and what resources are accessible to support these health care professionals. Explain best practices for improving staff retention rates within behavioral healthcare as derived from BHECNs' ongoing efforts to maintain and strengthen rural partnerships and satellite locations.   Identify how opportunities for networking amongst community members and other behavioral healthcare professionals can enhance retention in health care and benefit the community.   Speaker:   Christine Chasek, PhD, LIMHP, LADC, LPC   Dr. Tina Christine Chasek is an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha and Associate Workforce Director for UNMC’s Behavioral Healthcare Center of Nebraska. Dr. Chasek is a practicing mental health and addictions counselor with over 20 years of experience in treating substance use disorders. Dr. Chasek serves on the Nebraska Alcohol and Drug Licensing Board, Past President of the International Association of Alcohol and Drug Counselors, and coordinates Project ECHO in Nebraska.   Learn more about the Growing More Than Corn: Nebraska Behavioral Health Workforce Development series. 
Published: April 20, 2022
Multimedia
This event was held on April 13th, 2022, from 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. MT.  CLICK HERE to view the recording Event Description Suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth ages 10-24 per data gathered in 2019, with rates increasing 61.7% between 2009-2018 (Ivey-Stephenson et al., 2020).  Panelists represented perspectives from professionals working with youth in crisis in both the school and community. This panel discussed how some schools and communities are responding to this increasing epidemic and considerations specific to rural communities based on learned experiences. The targeted audience for this session was school mental health professionals and educators from Region 8, which takes in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.  Trainers McKinley Withers, Ed.D., M.Ed.                   I have had the privilege of working as teacher, counselor, and administrator. I received a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Science Teaching from Brigham Young University, a Master’s Degree in Psychology with an emphasis in School Counseling from Utah State University, and a Doctoral Degree in Educational Leadership and Policy from the University of Utah. I currently work as Jordan District’s Health and Wellness Consultant. If you don’t find me in public schools then you’ll find me with my amazing wife and beautiful children, running (preferably on trails), or trying some other outdoor hobby. I hope to meet you out in our schools or out in the wild!    Christin "Kiki" Quarry, BSN, MSN, PHN, RN                   Kiki Quarry has been practicing in the Emergency Department as an RN for 7 years in a rural community. She has earned her accelerated BSN from Samuel Merritt University graduating cum laude in 2013. And completed her MSN from UH Manoa in public health nursing graduating cum laude in 2016. She has applied to the University of Minnesota for her PhD in nursing focusing on research disparities of rural and indigenous communities. Kiki Quarry currently works at Maui Memorial Medical Center-Kaiser run community Hosptial level three trauma center. During her time there, she has worked in behavioral health and emergency medicine in the rural community of Maui. She has also spent time working in the community for Aloha house Licensed Crisis Residential Services and detox Center. She has focused trainings in Crisis Prevention Intervention, Trauma Nursing Core Certification, Advanced Trauma Certified Nurse, and community health liaison. Currently, she is a member of the DMAT team for Hawaii deployed during disasters, an OR RN for international delegations with Aloha Medical Missions, and continues to keep her 100-ton USCG-certified master/mater Captain’s License current with 20 plus years working professionally on boats.    Tina Boteilho, LMFT                   Tina Boteilho, LMFT is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist. Tina was born and raised on Maui. Tina lived in California for several years but couldn’t resist the invitation to go back to Maui after college. Over the past 20 years Tina has worked for several non-profit agencies and the state of Hawaii with children 0-18 years old, children with special health needs/disabilities and their families, individuals reintegrating back into their communities and families after several years of incarceration, emergency responders, military families, individuals needing crisis interventions, and individuals with serious and persistent mental illness. Tina currently runs her own private practice, contracts with several non-profits as a qualified mental health practitioner, has created several trainings for children, adolescents, couples, families, and individuals, and volunteers with several local non-profits. Tina has been invited to several trainings and conferences as a guest speaker to talk about best practices with people experiencing trauma and crisis, grief and loss, working in isolated rural areas, community resource building, pandemic relief, blending families, coparenting, LGBTQIA issues, and cultural sensitivity. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family hiking, going to the beach, landscaping, ranching, and farming.
Published: April 13, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Improving mental health care for Native people in rural areas is the focus of this 90-minute webinar presented by the National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC in collaboration with the Northwest MHTTC. The disparities between urban and rural areas in mental health care are well-documented. Native populations in rural areas suffer even more from these disparities, but cultural elements can improve mental health for Native people living in rural areas. Facilitator Raymond Daw, MA, Diné (Navajo), addresses the following learning objectives: Provide an overview of rural mental health disparities in the United States Provide an overview of Native American mental health disparities Describe Native American cultural elements for improved rural mental health This webinar is most relevant to those who: currently work with Native/Tribal communities OR work some with Native/Tribal clients OR want to learn more about Native/Tribal issues ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation and Summary Presentation slides Highlights and Key Concepts summary document - coming soon! Bibliography & Resources Cited in Presentation What is Rural America? - The United States Census Bureau The Future of Rural Behavioral Health, a policy brief by the National Rural Health Association Urban Indian Health Program: Fact Sheets Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), CDC: Suicide Trends Among and Within Urbanization Levels by Sex, Race/Ethnicity, Age Group, and Mechanism of Death — United States, 2001–2015 Surveillance Summaries / October 6, 2017 / 66(18); 1-16.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.ss6618a1 Honoring Children, Mending the Circle. Childhood Trauma in Indian Country. Presentation by Dolores Subia Bigfoot, PhD, Presidential Professor, director of the Indian Country Child Trauma Center within the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Overcoming Adverse Childhood Experiences, from the Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, a project of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIP) 61: Behavioral Health Services for American Indians and Alaska Natives, a SAMHSA publication Integrating Spirituality into Treatment: Resources for Practitioners by William R. Miller, PhD, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Decolonizing Mental Health  Decolonizing Mental Health. This series examines the transformative work of therapists and individuals of color, and calls for a redefining how we define psychiatric illness and health. Through 20 profiles, the digital series discusses what a more responsive mental health care system should look like. Historical Trauma Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart: Historical Trauma in Native American Populations (video) Indian Health Service webinar archives; topics include historical trauma Prevention Culture-Based Prevention Resources Good Medicine Bundle, from Operation Prevention. Use the wisdom of Native practices of wellness combined with the insights of modern science to help Native and non-Native students avoid the dangers of substance misuse. Tribal Opioid Response Resources, from the National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Suicide Prevention Native and Strong. Native and Strong is designed to inform and educate tribal communities about suicide prevention. This campaign is funded by the Washington State Department of Health. For 24/7 support, call (800) 273-8255 or text NATIVE to 741741. Transforming Tribal Communities: Indigenous Perspectives on Suicide Prevention, from Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). Organizations The Native Center for Behavioral Health is a research center at the University of Iowa College of Public Health committed to developing programs to support the behavioral health workforce in Native American and Alaska Native communities across the country. The National American Indian and Alaska Native MHTTC works with organizations and treatment practitioners involved in the delivery of mental health services to American Indian and Alaska Native individuals, families, and tribal and urban Indian communities to strengthen their capacity to deliver effective evidence-based and experience-based practices. This includes the full continuum of services spanning mental illness, prevention, treatment, and recovery support. The National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC provides education and training opportunities for individuals and groups involved in providing substance abuse treatment and counseling, including health professionals in primary prevention and treatment for substance abuse. The center offers services nationwide for consulting, technical assistance, and continuing education seminars. The National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center provides training and technical assistance services to the substance abuse prevention field including professionals, para-professionals, organizations and others in the prevention community focused on American Indian and Alaska Native communities. FACILITATOR Raymond Daw, MA, Navajo Nation Mr. Daw is a member of the Navajo Nation and is bilingual in Navajo and English. He is a trainer and web designer for the Takini Institute on the historical trauma intervention model, and he formerly worked as the Administrator of Behavioral Health at the Yukon-Kuskokwim Healthcare Corporation in Bethel, Alaska. During his tenure as Executive Director of Na’nizhoozhi Center, Inc. (NCI), he participated in research with the NIDA Clinical Trials Network through the University of New Mexico. NCI was recognized as a model and innovative program for AI/AN substance abuse treatment.
Published: March 17, 2022
Multimedia
Resources Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   988 is the new three-digit dialing code that will route callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. When people call, text, or chat 988, they will be connected to trained counselors that are part of the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network.    Learn more about March's Workshop Wednesday as we welcomed Charles Smith,PhD, MA, SAMHSA Regional Administrator, Region 8, as he presented an update on the status of 988, including the difference between 988 and 911, models for how 988 can work in your community, and additional state resources.    There was a Q&A session after the presentation.    Trainer Charles Smith, PhD, MA
Published: March 16, 2022
Multimedia
Each session will go from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. MT.  Event Description Depression is a condition experienced by a significant number of individuals, from children, adolescents, and adults. With the ongoing pandemic, the prevalence of depression has increased significantly. This three-part series reviewed evidence-based screening, diagnosis, and treatment of depression within primary care settings.    Session 1 - February 15, 2022 Screening for and Diagnosis of Depression in Primary Care   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives   Identify the use of common screening tools for depression/suicide risk in primary care  Utilize or recall common treatments for depression  Identify common medical differentials/co-morbidities of depression    Session 2 - March 1, 2022 Evidence-Based Treatment of Depression   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives   Identify evidence-based interventions for depression and suicide response  Utilize both pharmacologic and therapeutic interventions in treating to target  Identify practices in depression prevention planning    Session 3 - March 15, 2022 Pathways of Care: Building a Depression Follow-Up Program   View the slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to view the recording   Learning Objectives    Identify high-risk behavioral health patients  Recognize and define the roles of providers in a collaborative care model  Utilize a registry in order to track patient response to care    Trainers Dr. Andrew McLean                     Dr. McLean is Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He obtained his medical degree from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, completed a psychiatry residency at the University of Wisconsin and an M.P.H. degree from the University of Minnesota. He has been recognized as a UND School of Medicine Distinguished Alumnus, has received the American Psychiatric Association Bruno Lima award for outstanding contributions to Disaster Psychiatry, and has been conferred with numerous teaching excellence awards. Dr. McLean previously was the Medical Director of the ND Department of Human Services. He has served on numerous clinical, administrative and regulatory boards including medical licensing and professional health programs. He has lectured internationally on pertinent behavioral and public health issues. Dr. McLean has a particular interest in collaborative models of care. He also is interested in individual and community resilience.    Robin Landwehr, LPCC                     Robin is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) who holds a Master of Science degree in mental health counseling from Capella University, and a Doctor of Behavioral Health (DBH) degree from Arizona State University. She previously served as the behavioral health director at a Federally Qualified Health Center where she helped establish a Medication Assisted Treatment Program for individuals with opioid use disorder. During her career, she has been fortunate enough to be involved in numerous writing projects, provided many trainings, practiced as part of a collaborative care team, and provided clinical supervision. Her experience as a clinical counselor includes assisting individuals struggling with trauma, depression, anxiety, health behaviors, substance abuse, and other issues. She is a certified instructor in the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) and Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) suicide prevention programs.    Ken Flanagan                       Dr. Kenneth Flanagan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. He currently serves as a curriculum developer for the Mountain Plains Mental Health and Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.  Dr. Flanagan holds a license as a clinical social worker and provides counseling and behavioral management services with a clinical focus on depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues and chronic pain. He received his MSW and Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Dr. Flanagan has held a range of clinical and administrative positions in healthcare and community-based organizations.   
Published: March 15, 2022
Multimedia
This event was held on February 23, 2022. Access slide deck and other resources by clicking DOWNLOAD above Recording coming soon! Event Description According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people living in rural communities are at higher risk of suicide than their urban counterparts. The combination of greater access to firearms, high rates of drug and alcohol abuse, and limited access to psychologists and other mental health professionals form a lethal triad that contributes to the significantly higher numbers of suicide in rural communities.   In addition to these factors, many people living in rural community’s struggle with the stigma associated with mental health and seeking help.    For rural communities, confronting the reality of higher suicide numbers and the lingering impact on their communities while identifying and understanding how to address the relationships between these factors is key to addressing the problem.  This 4-hour seminar gave providers and anyone providing mental health support to individuals a working knowledge, resources, and community-based solutions for addressing suicide in rural communities. Participants learned about the signs and symptoms of suicide, the impact of stigma on seeking and maintaining treatment, the role of harm reduction, and suicide postvention for providers and families.        The seminar explored the following topics:  Stigma  Signs & Symptoms  Risk Factors vs. Protective Factors  How to Approach the Conversation as an individual and community.  Post-suicide - survivorship of the family "Nothing goes away in rural communities."    Content for this seminar was drawn from multiple sources including Mental Health First Aid, the Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Primary Care Practices, and the American Indian Addendum to the Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Primary Care Practices.     Due to the intensive and interactive nature of the seminar, registration was limited to 25 participants.    For more information, please contact:  [email protected]    Trainer Debra Brownlee, PhD
Published: February 23, 2022
Multimedia
Access slide deck with the green DOWNLOAD button above CLICK HERE to watch the recording This event was held on February 22nd, 2022.  Event Description Everyone can all think of things they want to change about themselves or their behavior. Why is it so difficult for many people to make those desired changes? In a word, motivation. When someone is motivated, changing their behavior for the better is no longer a matter of “if” but of “how.”  This understanding is the essence of Motivational Interviewing (MI), a popular psychotherapy technique that helps individuals make positive changes to their health, relationships, and quality of life.     Motivational Interviewing is a person-centered, non-confrontational counseling technique that prompts behavior change.  Behavioral and Cognitive Psychotherapy defines MI as “a directive, client-centered counseling style for eliciting behavior change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence.”  Originally MI was designed to address alcohol or other drug addictions but has recently been effective in situations where people may feel ambivalent about making positive behavioral changes. Motivational Interviewing is widely used to help patients address eating disorders, thoughts of suicide, smoking, gambling, hoarding, substance use disorder, and co-occurring disorders.  In this one-hour training, participants went away with a clear understanding of what Motivational Interviewing is and what it is not. Including steps on how to begin to use it most effectively to assist patients in discovering ways to make positive changes in their lives.     Trainer Ivory Tubbs, PhD Technical Expert, RCORP WICHE Behavioral Health Program                 Prior to earning his doctorate in psychology, Ivory served in the United States Air Force during Operation Desert Shield in logistics in 1991. Prior to his discharge from the military, Ivory’s career in the mental/behavioral health field began in Las Vegas, Nevada as a crisis intervention specialist. Later, he transitioned to the role of child development assistant with Clark County Family Services.  In 1999 he was appointed as the Executive Director of Windsor Village Social Services, an agency working in conjunction with FEMA to provide emergency food, shelter and utility assistance for area residents. In addition to fulfilling his duties as Executive Director, Ivory was also a Senior Public Health Investigator with the City of Houston, Bureau of Epidemiology conducting psycho-social assessments regarding sexual practices and opioid use within the HIV/AIDS community for the CDC. After his simultaneous roles as Executive Director and Senior Public Health Investigator, Ivory began adding to his knowledge base by joining the University of Texas School of Health Sciences, Psychiatric Center working with acute and subacute psychosis patients as well as patients in the forensic psychology unit for the Houston Police Department.  Ivory was also a Psychological Assessor focusing on dual diagnosis patients as well as outpatient therapy to monitor psychotropic drug interactions. Ivory took a hiatus from behavioral health to become an HR Manager in compliance and performance management for Walmart US. Ivory has served on several boards of directors and has done extensive work in the homeless community. He has also held the role of director working with the developmentally delayed population. 
Published: February 22, 2022
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Access slide deck with the green DOWNLOAD button above CLICK HERE to watch the recording This event was held on January 19, 2021.  Event Description The brain affects how a person thinks, feels, and acts. A TBI can affect physical functions, thinking abilities, behaviors, and more. TBI's are common among vulnerable populations including, veterans, athletes, homeless communities, and people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.    Join Judy Dettmer, Director for Strategic Partnerships at the National Association of State Head Injury Administrators (NASHIA), as she once again explored the intersection of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Mental Health. This training provided participants with a brief introduction to TBI and updates on data surrounding the relationship and intersectionality with mental health.      In this training, participants gained clarity about TBI's including, what a TBI is, how TBI's occur, their classification and severity, ways to help identify TBI's and recognize how misdiagnosis contribute to inappropriately targeted treatment and rehabilitation, and steps to help patients with a TBI.   Trainer Judy Dettmer, Director for Strategic Partnerships, NASHIA                       Judy Dettmer has been working in the field of brain injury for 30 years. Ms. Dettmer serves as NASHIA’s Director for Strategic Partnerships and a Technical Assistance Lead for the Traumatic Brain Injury Technical Assistance and Resource Center. Ms. Dettmer has worked extensively with adults, children and family members of individuals with brain injury. She has provided direct and systems consultation to improve the lives of individuals with brain injury. Judy has also assisted with research efforts related to brain injury and has conducted countless presentations, classes and seminars on brain injury both in the state of Colorado and nationally. Ms. Dettmer has provided technical assistance to numerous states on topics including but not limited to; screening on brain injury; developing infrastructure within state systems; interagency partnership development; and creation and management of advisory boards and councils. Judy has become a national leader in the field of criminal justice and brain injury, developing screening, identification and accommodations protocols in Colorado that have been routinely modeled by states. Ms. Dettmer is currently a co-facilitator for the National Collaborative on Children’s Brain Injury. 
Published: January 19, 2022
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  Event Description The holiday season can be stressful for many people, particularly as we prepare for the 2021 holiday season, with all its complexities.  Research indicates that mindfulness therapy and practices are very effective in helping to reduce levels of stress and feelings of being overwhelmed.  With this in mind, we are excited to present a mindfulness training series, Mindfulness Monday, for individuals working in high-stress situations or anyone looking to support their mental health and overall well-being by understanding and adopting mindfulness practices.  This training provided participants with a quick break and easy-to-use strategies that can help mitigate feelings of stress, especially during the holiday season.  It also used evidence-based practices from Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Dialectal Behavioral Therapy Evidence-based therapy and provided people with a basic understanding of how this practice works.    Session 1 - December 6, 2021 Access slide deck and handout by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session 2 - December 20,2021 Access slide deck and handout by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session 3 - January 10, 2022 Access slide deck and handout by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session 4 - January 24, 2022 Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session 5 - February 7, 2022 Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session 6 - February 21, 2022 Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Trainer Christina Ruggiero, CCC, RP   Christina developed this training and facilitated the sessions.  She is a Psychotherapist currently working at McMaster University in Ontario, CA.  Christina provided participants with practical tips and experiential activities that can be incorporated into daily routines and easily shared with others. 
Published: December 6, 2021
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  Supporting Mental Well-Being of Farmers and Their Families; HHS Region 8 Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE for the recording   Session Description As part of our ongoing effort to address farm stress in rural agricultural communities, the Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC), in collaboration with the Colorado AgrAbility Project, is proud to present Supporting Mental Well-Being of Farmers and Their Families, a training on suicide awareness and prevention for farmers and their families.    Our producers work in high-stress, variable environments with careers and income dependent on weather conditions, variable commodity pricing, tariffs, and more. As a result, many farmers (to include owners, producers, ranchers, and seasonal workers) experience significant stress that can challenge their mental well-being. This session will provide a clear and relevant definition of farm stress and explain how farm owners, ranchers, agricultural workers, and migrant farmers experience farm stress. Dr. Andrew McLean, a clinical professor and chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, will discuss the prevalence of mental illness (to include substance misuse), as well as barriers to mental health care access, and utilization among rural and agricultural communities. Additional topics include specific information about how to prevent and screen for the risk of suicide; and behavioral health care prevention and treatment models that have worked for rural agricultural communities.    Trainer Andrew McLean, MD, MPH Dr. McLean is a Clinical Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences. He is also a hospital surveyor for The Joint Commission. He previously was the Medical Director of the ND Department of Human Services. Dr. McLean has served on a number of clinical, administrative, and regulatory boards including medical licensing and professional health programs. He has lectured internationally on pertinent behavioral and public health issues. Dr. McLean has a particular interest in individual and community resilience and collaborative care.  
Published: November 17, 2021
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Objectives: Identify the unique challenges encountered by college students from tribal communities Discuss the importance of mental health and health equity related to students attending a tribal college Develop outreach efforts including counseling services to support the mental health of students attending tribal colleges Identify strategies to support the mental health needs of faculty and staff at tribal colleges   Speakers: Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, as well as in schools, communities, and other integrated care locations with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities.   Belinda Hinojos, Ph.D., received her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in counseling psychology from the University of Kansas. She completed her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is a staff psychologist and training director with Morningstar. In this role, she provides mental health services to American Indian communities in Nebraska. This includes outreach and services to the Little Priest Tribal College and the Nebraska Indian Community College. Dr. Hinojos previously held the position of training director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s (UNL) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Throughout her career, Dr. Hinojos has focused on increasing access to quality mental health services for people of color. She began her work at UNL-CAPS as the Diversity Coordinator and Latinx Outreach Specialist. Prior to starting her doctoral program, Dr. Hinojos worked at a community mental health agency in Kansas City providing mental health services to the Latinx community. She is an active member of the National Latinx Psychological Association. She currently serves on the Standing Committee on Diversity through the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies, in addition to the Training Advisory Committee for the Minority Fellowship Program through the American Psychological Association. Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities  
Published: November 6, 2021
Presentation Slides
Watch the webinar.   Objectives: Identify the unique challenges encountered by college students from tribal communities Discuss the importance of mental health and health equity related to students attending a tribal college Develop outreach efforts including counseling services to support the mental health of students attending tribal colleges Identify strategies to support the mental health needs of faculty and staff at tribal colleges   Speakers: Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, as well as in schools, communities, and other integrated care locations with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities.   Belinda Hinojos, Ph.D., received her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in counseling psychology from the University of Kansas. She completed her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is a staff psychologist and training director with Morningstar. In this role, she provides mental health services to American Indian communities in Nebraska. This includes outreach and services to the Little Priest Tribal College and the Nebraska Indian Community College. Dr. Hinojos previously held the position of training director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s (UNL) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Throughout her career, Dr. Hinojos has focused on increasing access to quality mental health services for people of color. She began her work at UNL-CAPS as the Diversity Coordinator and Latinx Outreach Specialist. Prior to starting her doctoral program, Dr. Hinojos worked at a community mental health agency in Kansas City providing mental health services to the Latinx community. She is an active member of the National Latinx Psychological Association. She currently serves on the Standing Committee on Diversity through the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies, in addition to the Training Advisory Committee for the Minority Fellowship Program through the American Psychological Association.   Learn more about Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities
Published: November 6, 2021
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