Products and Resources Catalog

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Toolkit
This handout complements Supporting the Mental Health Needs of Students Attending Tribal Colleges, part of the webinar series Healing Roots: Considerations for Mental Health Accessibility and Delivery of Services Across Tribal Communities.  
Published: November 3, 2021
Multimedia
  Suicide Prevention in Primary Care - Workshop Wednesday Session Access slide deck with the green download button above Click here to watch the recording   Session Description Statistics show that suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States, particularly in the Rocky Mountain region. Physicians and primary care staff are the most common point of contact for individuals struggling with their mental health. This training examines concerns within the clinical setting about suicide risk, assessment, and intervention. Using the Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Primary Care Practices as a guide, participants will learn about the assessment tools PHQ and Columbia, how to ask someone if they are considering suicide, and other intervention strategies.    Trainer Debra Brownlee, PhD
Published: October 20, 2021
Multimedia
  Access slide decks with the green download button above Recordings for each session posted below   Series Description Addressing Rural Co-Morbidities of Mental Health and Social Conditions   Individuals living in rural communities face unique challenges when attempting to access care for mental health concerns. The “three A’s” of rural treatment barriers often reference the difficulty of finding accessible, affordable, and acceptable care for persons in remote and rural settings. Co-morbid mental health and social conditions increase the complexity of treatment and make delivering evidence-based care challenging for mental health providers of all professions. This series will review practices that providers can utilize to support rural populations presenting with a variety of co-morbid conditions.   Part One: Employing Treatment and Environmental Interventions to Support Rural Populations Click here to watch the recording   Part Two: Supporting Rural Aging Populations Click here to watch the recording   Part Three: Using Faith Supports to Increase Mental Health in Rural Communities Click here to watch the recording   Trainer Ken Flanagan, PhD, LCSW
Published: October 5, 2021
Multimedia
  Implementing Farm Stress Grab-n-Go Kits in HHS Region 7 and 8 Communities Access slide deck with green download button above Click here to watch the recording Farm stress is the stress experienced by farmers and their families due to the unique agricultural work environment. This past year created escalating levels of mental health distress for everyone. In response to the pandemic, farming and ranching communities already dealing with high stress levels saw incidents of drug and alcohol abuse rapidly increase, as well as rising numbers of death by suicide.   In response to the increasing need for mental health tools designed to address the specific needs of farm and ranching communities, the Mid-America Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC), the Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC), and the Mountain Plains MHTTC collaborated to develop a set of easy-to-use ("Grab-n-Go") presentations and flyers for use by extension offices and behavioral health providers in farm communities. Based on interviews with extension agents in HHS Region 7 and HHS Region 8, the team identified four key areas of concern: mental health awareness, stigma, co-occurring disorders, and death by suicide.     During this presentation, participants will learn who could benefit from using these free resources, how to use the resources effectively, and a brief background on the conversations and research that spurred the resources' development.   After attending this session, participants can expect to:   Learn why the Farm Stress Grab-n-Go Kits were made and who can benefit from using these resources.  Learn how to effectively use the Farm Stress Grab-n-Go Kits, as well as other MHTTC Farm Stress resources.  Learn how to initiate difficult community conversations about mental health issues to support community-based solutions.    Trainers Brandy Clarke, PhD, LP, Director, Region 7 Mid-America MHTTC Erika Holliday, MPH, CHES, Sr. Program Support Coordinator, Region 7 ATTC, Maridee Shogren, DNP, CNM, CLC, University of North Dakota, Region 8 MHTTC and ATTC Genevieve Berry, Project Manager, Region 8 MHTTC 
Published: July 28, 2021
Presentation Slides
  Building Resilience Among Providers During a Global Health Pandemic (4-Part Series) Access slide decks and toolkit with the green download link above Session descriptions and recordings below   Providing physical or behavioral healthcare to others during the global health pandemic can lead to increased levels of stress, fear, anxiety, burnout, frustration, and other strong emotions. It is imperative that physical and behavioral healthcare providers recognize personal signs of mental fatigue, are given supports in their organization to ensure continued productivity and quality care, and are provided with tools to learn how to cope and build resilience. This training series has been developed to encourage self-care and to assist in building resilience among physical and behavioral healthcare providers amidst the global health pandemic.   Session One: Understanding the Impact of a Public Health Crisis on Medical and Behavioral Healthcare Providers   This session will outline common terms, introduce compassion fatigue, and discuss the impact of moral injury and traumatic stress. Speakers will also present a toolkit that has been developed to assist providers and their organizations in building resiliency.   Watch the recording here   Session Two: Home Life, Clinical Care, and Work Relationships: Causes of Stress and Resiliency Building for Providers   Presenters will discuss home life stressors, challenges of managing work relationships during a time of crisis, and the current issues facing providers as they work to provide quality care during a public health emergency. This session will also offer specific solutions and key resources for fostering resilience and balancing demands of home life, clinical care, and professional relationships during a pandemic.   Watch the recording here   Session Three: Preventing and Responding to Grief, Loss, and Secondary Traumatic Stress among Providers   Providers are experiencing loss of normalcy, loss of routine, and other ambiguous loss. Many may also be dealing with grief over the loss of a loved one, or the loss of numerous patients. Compounding this sense of loss and grief, providers commonly carry their patients’ stories with them. It is important that providers connect with their patients. If providers feel nothing, then they cannot connect as strongly and may not be able to optimize patient care. However, this connection, especially during a pandemic, can lead to secondary traumatic stress (STS). This session will address signs and symptoms of grief and loss among providers that have been present during the pandemic, and will describe secondary traumatic stress. Presenters will also offer ways to prevent and respond to these experiences at both an organizational and individual level.   Watch the recording here   Session Four: Promoting Resiliency at an Organizational Level   Research indicates that, although efforts to promote resilience at an individual level are important, addressing characteristics of the external environment are at least as important. Absence of organizational and leadership support for provider distress during COVID-19 may adversely impact organizational resilience, patient safety, and staff retention. Providers cannot sustain their own well-being without the support of their leadership. Targets for improvement at the organizational level include ensuring:   Organizational efficiency through identifying inefficient workplace processes. A transformational work culture. Correction of any negative leadership behaviors.   Watch the recording here
Published: June 16, 2021
Multimedia
Mid-America MHTTC trainer Holly Roberts, PhD, LP, sits down with Jason Medows of Ag State of Mind to talk about rural mental health and telehealth. Episode description: Back to interview podcasts today. A few months ago, Elizabeth Lewan from American Psychological Association reached out to me regarding the impact COVID has had on America’s farmers. She put me in contact with Dr. Holly Roberts from the Psychology Department at University of Nebraska Medical Center. Holly and I chatted about her background in a farming community and how getting mental health care treatment into farming communities is often a challenge. We discuss that although COVID is a challenge, it also produced the opportunity to showcase that Telehealth can really work. I am very flattered that APA reached out to me and put me in touch with Holly. I’m also quite impressed that APA is recognizing this need and is going to work on it. To get in contact with Holly send her a message at [email protected]. Learn more about Ag State of Mind
Published: June 15, 2021
Multimedia
Overcoming Mental Health Stigma - Workshop Wednesday Session Access slide decks with the green download button above View Recording   Session Description May is Mental Health Awareness Month and the Mountain Plains MHTTC hosted a session on overcoming mental health stigma. Marvis Doster, CARN, and Chris Harsell, DNP, ANP-BC, examined ways to identify and address mental health stigma. The Mountain Plains MHTTC supports research and information gathering on mental health stigma in rural communities and we invite you to learn more here.   Trainers Chris Harsell, DNP, ANP-BC Marvis Doster, CARN  
Published: May 19, 2021
Toolkit
  Hard copies of the toolkit are also available. If you'd prefer a hard copy, please reach out to us at [email protected]. Toolkit Description Healing Our Protectors: Building Resilience Among Tribal Law Enforcement Officers Through Cultural Interventions is a Mountain Plains MHTTC resource that serves behavioral health treatment providers in gaining a deeper understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of their work as a law enforcement officer. Co-authored by Leo Belgarde, Sr., it provides a first person account of his experiences as a tribal officer, Bureau of Indian Affairs officer, city officer, and county police officer. It describes events that precipitated him seeking treatment for PTSD and the consequences he faced due to accessing treatment. Healing Our Protectors is a resource that has been developed to provide strength-based, positive, culturally responsive strategies for Indigenous law enforcement officers. If the officer does not connect with this aspect of their culture, this resource still supports a cultural representation of where they are policing and can be modified to meet their needs.   Authors LaVonne Fox, PhD Leo Belgarde, Sr. Thomasine Heitkamp, LCSW   Editor Shawnda Schroeder, PhD, MA
Published: May 4, 2021
Toolkit
    Hard copies of the toolkit are also available. If you'd prefer a hard copy, please reach out to us at [email protected]. Toolkit Description Providing physical or behavioral healthcare to others during the global health pandemic can lead to increased levels of stress, fear, anxiety, burnout, frustration, and other strong emotions. It is imperative that physical and behavioral healthcare providers recognize personal signs of mental fatigue, are given supports in their organization to ensure continued productivity and quality care, and are provided with tools to learn how to cope and build resilience.   This toolkit has been developed to encourage self-care and to assist in building resilience among physical and behavioral healthcare providers amidst the global health pandemic. It walks the reader through a case scenario of one rural primary care provider who learns to identify signs of common mental, emotional, and psychological concerns that have arisen because of the global health pandemic. Following the case presentation are strategies for developing a personal mental health and wellness plan as well as recommendations for the health systems who employ these essential, frontline workers. Organizations can and should consider adaptations to support their employees during the pandemic, and to follow. Authors Shawnda Schroeder, PhD, MA Per Ostmo, BA Robin Landwehr, DBH, LPCC, NCC Andy McLean, MD, MPH Thomasine Heitkamp, LCSW
Published: April 29, 2021
Presentation Slides
  Mental Health and Substance Use Co-Occurring Disorders – An Overview of Skills and Best Practices (5-Part Series) Access slide decks with the green download link above Session descriptions and recordings below   Only 7.4% of individuals with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders receive treatment for both disorders and approximately 55% are receiving no treatment at all (Priester, et al 2016). Access, availability, and affordability to behavioral health treatment is even more difficult when residing in rural areas. This series offers strategies and interventions to address the challenges faced by providers working in rural and remote communities and explore skills and practices that can help support interventions for this population. This series builds on the previous work of the Mountain Plains MHTTC and Mountain Plains ATTC developed product "Depression, Alcohol and Farm Stress: Addressing Co-Occurring Disorders in Rural America."   Session One: Mental Health and Substance Use Prevalence in Populations and Key Barriers   Co-occurring disorders (individuals with both mental health concerns and substance use disorders) have a large societal impact on people living in rural communities where access to resources may be limited. This session will provide a review of key prevalence rates of mental health and substance use disorders with particular attention given to understanding the barriers to care that exist in rural communities. View Recording   Session Two: Case Management Practices for Supporting Substance Use and Mental Health Treatment   Effectively accessing care and leveraging case management services ensures positive outcomes for patients experiencing co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. This session will explore crucial case management skills that minimize duplication of services, support access to care, and ensure a client-centered approach is maintained throughout interventions. View Recording   Session Three: Contingency Management with Serious Mental Illness   Contingency management is an evidence-based treatment approach focused on the principles of behavior management and cognitive-behavioral therapy that provides incentives for meeting treatment goals. This session will describe how contingency management can be utilized when working with individuals with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders to improve treatment outcomes. View Recording   Session Four: Clinical Supervision Practices for Mental Health and Substance Use Providers   Clinical supervision is critical in achieving a well-functioning clinical community. This training will focus on assessment and treatment planning (looking at the client/patient holistically) when conducting supervision sessions. In addition, this session will address the importance of expanding counselors/therapists’ clinical capacity with patients who present with complex diagnoses utilizing clinical supervision strategies. View Recording   Session Five: Providing Mental Health and Substance Use Treatment in an Integrated Care Setting   Integrated physical, mental health, and substance use care is effective in supporting the needs of individuals experiencing co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. This session will describe effective integrated care models that promote long-term interventions for individuals experiencing co-occurring disorders. View Recording
Published: April 22, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Staff from the Lummi Tribal Health Center describe and discuss the unique challenges to providing psychiatric care in a coordinated and collaborative way to a tribal community during the coronavirus pandemic. Learning Objectives briefly describe intergenerational trauma experienced by Native Americans understand complex components to behavioral health and medical services as a part of some tribal health systems review how Lummi Psychiatry adapted to the pandemic and how this has provided challenges and opportunities Find out more about our integrated care webinar series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Our facilitators always make reference to great resources during sessions.  Presentation slides   FACILITATORS George "Bud" Vana, MD George "Bud" Vana, MD, is a Triple Boarder – having taken three board exams as a general pediatrician, adult psychiatrist and child psychiatrist – practicing at the Lummi Tribal Health Center in Bellingham, Washington.  He and his psychiatric team are integrated and collocated (before coronavirus) in the medical clinic, substance abuse program, pediatrics department, school based health clinic and behavioral health department. He finished his BA and MA at Harvard University in Near Eastern Languages and Civilization. He completed medical school at the University of Vermont and completed residency training at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. He completed his outpatient psychiatry training at the Providence Rhode Island Veterans Administration.  He has worked to develop a telehealth infrastructure at the Lummi Tribal Health Center as well as a child psychiatry consultation service for other tribal health clinics. His other professional interests include family-based psychiatry, acceptance and commitment therapy, treatment of co-occurring disorders, treatment of developmental disabilities and integrated medical and behavioral healthcare. Outside of work he enjoys canoeing, hiking and curling (as in the Olympic ice sport) with his family in Bellingham. Jessica McLendon, CMA Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Jessica first received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Global Studies at Pacific Lutheran University. After moving to Bellingham, she started working in the non-profit field for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwest Washington and later, at Northwest Youth Services, a housing provider for homeless youth. In 2017 she completed her certification in Medical Assisting and started working at Lummi Tribal Health Clinic in 2018. Jessica is passionate about witnessing peoples’ stories and connecting individuals to the appropriate resources to help them achieve their goals. Cedric Robertston Cedric Robertson serves as a Peer Recovery Coach at the Lummi Tribal Health Center.
Published: April 12, 2021
Interactive Resource
About this Resource: Region IV is the largest HHS region, comprised of eight states and 26% of the U.S. population. These states have large rural populations which tend to have reduced access to mental health care.  Assessing the availability and accessibility of mental health services, in particular evidence-based practices, for rural residents can be challenging. The Southeast MHTTC Data Visualization Project provides information on Region IV priorities in an easy to understand graphical format.   Potential Impact of Rurality on Mental Health Care Access Relevant Factors: Mental health facility availability and evidence-based practice offerings How to Use: Click on "VIEW RESOURCE" to access interactive map and visualize the intersection of these factors by county, state or region.
Published: April 9, 2021
Multimedia
Dr. Phillip Hawley from the Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic outlines the foundations of the primary care behavioral health (PCBH) model of integration in this webinar, the second in our integrated care webinar series. Dr. Hawley also discusses a variety of clinical applications to why meeting patients where they are at and working within the primary care system provides holistic and quality to patient care. The presentation includes statistics and case examples highlighting how this approach covers gaps in our healthcare system and works towards true population health strategies. Find out more about our integrated care webinar series here. Learning objectives: Understand what PCBH is and how this is defined See examples of how this model address social determinants of health to reduce healthcare disparity Learn clinical applications about how holistic primary care that encompasses behavioral health allows for improved outcomes in behavioral health and physical health metrics.   Resources Presentation slides Presenter Dr. Phillip Hawley is the Primary Care Behavioral Health Director for the Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic (YVFWC). Phillip is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and has worked in primary care for the past 6 years. Phillip manages the Primary Care Behavioral Health program, consisting of 17 BHCs across Washington and Oregon who provide behavioral health service within the PCBH model of integration. Phillip’s role as director includes: Site visits and ongoing support of BHC within the organization, reporting for internal and external stakeholders, supervision for the BHC post-doctoral residents, hiring/ onboarding and training of newly hired BHCs, coordination with regional healthcare and behavioral health organizations through sub-committees and workgroups, direct patient care through same day consultation, and providing in-service trainings to assess mental health concerns to staff and the community. Phillip is focused on assisting in complete health care for patients. Phillip and his wife reside in Naches, WA. Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: March 29, 2021
Multimedia
Participants for this webinar will develop an understanding of mental health inequity in rural communities and reservations. This webinar will describe unique components such as challenges to financial sustainability, integration of culture, provider recruitment and retention, and overall health conditions of these communities. Strategies to overcoming these barriers will be described by current practices of clinics in a rural and reservation setting.    Learning Objectives: Discuss overall health disparities including rates of comorbidities and factors contributing to inequities in behavioral health across rural areas and reservations.  Identify strategies for decolonizing service delivery and incorporating cultural values and norms of communities served.  Identify challenges related to the sustainability of funding and the limitations on specialty providers for the community and how each member of the interdisciplinary health care team can help strategically to maintain quality service delivery in sparsely populated areas.    Describe the benefits and challenges of telehealth during a pandemic.    Speaker(s):   Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, schools, communities and in integrated care with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities. Kay Bond, PhD, LP, is the co-founder of Tidal Integrated Health, Inc., and co-director of Behavioral Pediatrics in Primary Care at NOVA Behavioral Healthcare Corporation in Goldsboro, N.C. Dr. Bond is passionate about providing high-quality behavioral health services to young people and their families in rural, low-income, and underserved communities. She is also an experienced behavioral health supervisor. Most recently, Dr. Bond established two pediatric integrated behavioral health clinics designed to increase children’s access to behavioral health treatment and reduce the stigma involved in participating in therapy. Dr. Bond’s clinical and research interests include sleep, elimination disorders, and disruptive behavior and noncompliance. Dr. Bond is also interested in integrating behavioral health into primary care practices and clinical supervision. She earned her Ph.D. in Pediatric School Psychology at East Carolina University in 2016, and she completed her internship and fellowship in Behavioral Pediatrics/Integrated Primary Care at the Munroe-Meyer Institute at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 2018. Coming Home to Primary Care: Pediatric Integrated Health  
Published: March 26, 2021
Presentation Slides
Participants for this webinar will develop an understanding of mental health inequity in rural communities and reservations. This webinar will describe unique components such as challenges to financial sustainability, integration of culture, provider recruitment and retention, and overall health conditions of these communities. Strategies to overcoming these barriers will be described by current practices of clinics in a rural and reservation setting.    Learning Objectives: Discuss overall health disparities including rates of comorbidities and factors contributing to inequities in behavioral health across rural areas and reservations.  Identify strategies for decolonizing service delivery and incorporating cultural values and norms of communities served.  Identify challenges related to the sustainability of funding and the limitations on specialty providers for the community and how each member of the interdisciplinary health care team can help strategically to maintain quality service delivery in sparsely populated areas.    Describe the benefits and challenges of telehealth during a pandemic.    Speaker(s):   Dr. Anitra Warrior is the owner of Morningstar Counseling and Consultation in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology in 2015 and has operated her clinic since 2012. Since receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Warrior has established four additional clinics that are now located throughout eastern Nebraska. Morningstar offers counseling on two college campuses, schools, communities and in integrated care with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Clinic sites are based on reservations and in rural and urban settings. Dr. Warrior specializes in treating trauma in children through the utilization of evidenced based practices that have been adapted to the American Indian population. Most recently, Morningstar has become a training site for doctoral candidates with the Munroe-Meyer Institute. This track will focus on integrated care on the reservation as well as provide additional clinical training opportunities in schools, colleges, and in the tribal communities. Kay Bond, PhD, LP, is the co-founder of Tidal Integrated Health, Inc., and co-director of Behavioral Pediatrics in Primary Care at NOVA Behavioral Healthcare Corporation in Goldsboro, N.C. Dr. Bond is passionate about providing high-quality behavioral health services to young people and their families in rural, low-income, and underserved communities. She is also an experienced behavioral health supervisor. Most recently, Dr. Bond established two pediatric integrated behavioral health clinics designed to increase children’s access to behavioral health treatment and reduce the stigma involved in participating in therapy. Dr. Bond’s clinical and research interests include sleep, elimination disorders, and disruptive behavior and noncompliance. Dr. Bond is also interested in integrating behavioral health into primary care practices and clinical supervision. She earned her Ph.D. in Pediatric School Psychology at East Carolina University in 2016, and she completed her internship and fellowship in Behavioral Pediatrics/Integrated Primary Care at the Munroe-Meyer Institute at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 2018. Coming Home to Primary Care: Pediatric Integrated Health  
Published: March 26, 2021
Presentation Slides
This webinar will share best practices and lessons learned about creating permanent supportive housing programs for rural communities that meet SAMSHA fidelity guidelines. The presentation covers the philosophy, funding, and solutions for program challenges and potential next steps for interested communities.   Learning objectives: Introduce the permanent supportive housing (PSH) model Explore PSH models through a rural lens Analyze lessons learned from establishing rural PSH Describe the next steps for communities interested in implementing rural PSH   Speaker: Jennifer Lopez is a permanent supportive housing consultant with 22 years of experience in the field of affordable housing and homelessness programming. Based in Durango, Colorado, Lopez brings significant experience and ideas from multiple communities in her role as the co-founder and manager of Project Moxie, a consulting firm that helps communities plan for the implementation of permanent supportive housing. Since 2017, she has provided technical assistance to develop permanent supportive housing (PSH) in New Mexico, Colorado and Mammoth Lakes, California. In 2019, Lopez helped to facilitate the first affordable housing investment strategy for the Colorado Health Foundation as part of its health equity work in Colorado. Lopez also brings significant experience in affordable housing finance and program development to her work with local communities. This includes structuring complex bond and tax credit financing for affordable housing and supportive housing. From 2014-2017, Lopez worked across Colorado’s state agencies as the Director of Homelessness Initiatives for then-Gov. John Hickenlooper, implementing outcome-based policies and programs to prevent and end homelessness in Colorado.   Permanent Supportive Housing: A Webinar Series  
Published: March 19, 2021
Presentation Slides
This webinar will share best practices and lessons learned about creating permanent supportive housing programs for rural communities that meet SAMSHA fidelity guidelines. The presentation covers the philosophy, funding, and solutions for program challenges and potential next steps for interested communities.   Learning objectives: Introduce the permanent supportive housing (PSH) model Explore PSH models through a rural lens Analyze lessons learned from establishing rural PSH Describe the next steps for communities interested in implementing rural PSH   Speaker: Jennifer Lopez is a permanent supportive housing consultant with 22 years of experience in the field of affordable housing and homelessness programming. Based in Durango, Colorado, Lopez brings significant experience and ideas from multiple communities in her role as the co-founder and manager of Project Moxie, a consulting firm that helps communities plan for the implementation of permanent supportive housing. Since 2017, she has provided technical assistance to develop permanent supportive housing (PSH) in New Mexico, Colorado and Mammoth Lakes, California. In 2019, Lopez helped to facilitate the first affordable housing investment strategy for the Colorado Health Foundation as part of its health equity work in Colorado. Lopez also brings significant experience in affordable housing finance and program development to her work with local communities. This includes structuring complex bond and tax credit financing for affordable housing and supportive housing. From 2014-2017, Lopez worked across Colorado’s state agencies as the Director of Homelessness Initiatives for then-Gov. John Hickenlooper, implementing outcome-based policies and programs to prevent and end homelessness in Colorado.   Permanent Supportive Housing: A Webinar Series  
Published: March 19, 2021
Multimedia
  The pandemic has brought challenges and disruption to substance use disorder services along with opportunities. The presentation will examine these new opportunities and “how to get there.” Learning Objectives Participants will: Recognize some of the opportunities that have resulted from the pandemic. Explore the role of resilience in responding to service needs during the pandemic, and as a path to opportunities.   Speaker   Sheila Weix, MSN, RN, CARN During her tenure as a leader in SUD treatment, Sheila Weix has been involved with emergencies related to the HIV epidemic, 9/11, and the 2008 economic collapse. She is currently applying this experience in an outpatient treatment service that includes medication-assisted treatment in rural Wisconsin during the COVID19 pandemic.     IN CASE YOU MISSED IT... Video: Substance Use Disorder Services in the Days of a Pandemic (Part 1) Video: Substance Use Disorder Services in the Days of a Pandemic (Part 2)  
Published: February 19, 2021
Print Media
Original Publication Date: 2/11/2021 The Pacific Southwest MHTTC curated a list of resources to support mental health needs of agricultural workers. The list includes relevant webinars, podcasts, publications, and online resources.
Published: February 11, 2021
Presentation Slides
Strengthening Resilience: Promoting Positive School Mental Health Among Indigenous Youth January 13, 2021 This free training, hosted by LaVonne Fox, PhD, OTR/L, Sarah Nielsen, PhD, OTR/L, and Thomasine Heitkamp, LCSW, provided participants with context and information related to the new publication developed by the Mountain Plains MHTTC entitled: Strengthening Resilience: Promoting Positive School Mental Health Among Indigenous Youth. This training provided participants with a chance to learn more about how to adapt the recommendations of this toolkit in their schools. Slide Deck Access the Toolkit Recording   Learning Outcomes Understand how to use resilience and culturally responsive practices to support the unmet needs of Indigenous youth.  Develop a deeper understanding of how trauma impacts Indigenous youth, including historical trauma.  Advance participants' understanding of the cultural context of Indigenous youth and how this relates to a school setting.  Learn strategies for incorporating traditional practices such as the Seven Teachings and Circle of Courage into a K-12 setting.    Trainers LaVonne Fox, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Nielsen, PhD, OTR/L Thomasine Heitkamp, LCSW
Published: January 13, 2021
Multimedia
Indian Health Care Providers Series This recorded webinar, held on September 17, 2020, features an open engagement/discussion among participants focused on addressing barriers and highlighting innovations in telebehavioral health, e.g., identify barriers with the delivery of telehealth such as access to technology, privacy, issues with physical location and comfort for providers and clients; highlight innovations being explored and discuss the positive outcomes rising to the surface during this rapid onset of telehealth. Presentation from this webinar is available for download here Organizing Partners include the Behavioral Health Training, Workforce and Policy Innovation Center of the University of Washington's Behavioral Health Institute in partnership with the WA State Health Care Authority (HCA).  Key Tribal Partners include the Indian Health Service's Telebehavioral Health Center of Excellence (TBHCE), the American Indian Health Commission (AIHC) of Washington State and others. Partners & Presenters Chris Fore, Ph.D, Director, IHS TeleBehavioral Health Center of Excellence at Indian Health Service Melody McKee, MS, SUDP, Program Director for the Behavioral Health Training, Workforce and Policy Innovation Center through Harborview Medical Center’s Behavioral Health Institute Cara Towle, MSN, RN, MA, Associate Director for Telepsychiatry at the University of Washington Kathryn Akeah and Jen Olsen, American Indian Health Commission Mike Longnecker, Tribal Operations and Compliance Manager, WA HCA Kristi Woodard, LICSW, Behavioral Health Consultant, Portland Area Indian Health Service (IHS) Lucilla Mendoza, MSW, CPP Tribal Behavioral Health Administrator, Office of Tribal Affairs, WA HCA Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: October 21, 2020
Multimedia
Indian Health Care Providers Series This recorded webinar, held on September 24, 2020, features Dr. Chris Fore, Director, IHS TeleBehavioral Health Center of Excellence at Indian Health Service. Dr. Fore will present “Introduction to Telebehavioral Health for IHCPs”, covering topics such as defining telehealth, workflow considerations, configuring the space and privacy issues, billing and reimbursement and special considerations and more. The focus will be informed by the previous session’s discussion. Lucilla Mendoza, tribal behavioral health administrator with the Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA), will attend as the HCA billing/IHCP expert to attend and help field questions. Presentation from this webinar is available for download here Organizing Partners include the Behavioral Health Training, Workforce and Policy Innovation Center of the University of Washington's Behavioral Health Institute in partnership with the WA State Health Care Authority (HCA).  Key Tribal Partners include the Indian Health Service's Telebehavioral Health Center of Excellence (TBHCE), the American Indian Health Commission (AIHC) of Washington State and others. Partners & Presenters Chris Fore, Ph.D, Director, IHS TeleBehavioral Health Center of Excellence at Indian Health Service Melody McKee, MS, SUDP, Program Director for the Behavioral Health Training, Workforce and Policy Innovation Center through Harborview Medical Center’s Behavioral Health Institute Cara Towle, MSN, RN, MA, Associate Director for Telepsychiatry at the University of Washington Kathryn Akeah and Jen Olsen, American Indian Health Commission Mike Longnecker, Tribal Operations and Compliance Manager, WA HCA Kristi Woodard, LICSW, Behavioral Health Consultant, Portland Area Indian Health Service (IHS) Lucilla Mendoza, MSW, CPP Tribal Behavioral Health Administrator, Office of Tribal Affairs, WA HCA                 Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: October 21, 2020
Presentation Slides
  Pine Ridge Girls' School: Trauma Responsive Practices This free series consisted of two, 75-minute training sessions that provided technical assistance to the Pine Ridge Girls' School in South Dakota, in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Region 8. With a focus on trauma and healing within a cultural context, trainers discussed stigma, resilience, trauma informed teaching approaches, and supporting families to support their students. Part One September 13, 2020 This session explored the effects of trauma on behavior and learning, trauma informed techniques in the classroom, modifications for virtual learning environments, and teacher self care to avoid burnout. Slide deck Part Two September 20, 2020 This session discussed partnering with families to support learning and parent and family education to support students' mental wellness. Slide deck Trainers Stefanie Winfield MSW Stefanie Winfield is a Research and Technical Assistance Associate with the Behavioral Health Program. Her work at WICHE focuses on the Mental Health Technical Transfers Center’s work providing intensive technical assistance and training to elementary schools. Stefanie comes to WICHE with extensive experience working in schools promoting youth sexual health, conflict and angry management, behavioral health education, and school-based health care. With over 17 years of experience working with nonprofits and community organizations, Stefanie has done everything from grant management and implementation, to program and outcome evaluation, training and facilitation. Stefanie received her BSW from Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY and her MSW from the University of Denver. She has also completed certificates in the Advanced Study of Program Evaluation, Accelerated Learning, E-learning Design and Organization Development.   Liza Tupa, PhD Dr. Liza Tupa is the Director of Education and Research for the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Behavioral Health Program (WICHE BHP) and a technical trainer for the Mountain Plains MHTTC. A licensed clinical psychologist, her work at the WICHE BHP has included expanding rural psychology internship development to seven western states, behavioral healthcare workforce training, service delivery system and clinical consultation, statewide behavioral health needs assessments, and developing toolkits for Suicide Prevention in Primary Care and School Behavioral Health Advocacy.
Published: September 13, 2020
Presentation Slides
Suicide Prevention in Rural Primary Care  People who die by suicide are more likely to have been seen by a primary care provider in the 30 days prior to their death than any other health care discipline. In rural areas especially, where behavioral health resources are fewer and stigma around seeking mental health help may be greater, it is crucial that primary care providers have the knowledge, skills, and tools necessary to help prevent suicide among their clients. This webinar series introduced a simple toolkit to help put suicide prevention protocols into place in a practice or clinic, and walked participants through the screening, assessment, and intervention phases of suicide prevention. Tips for addressing suicidal issues via telehealth were also included.   Part One Office Protocols, Screening, and Assessment August 26, 2020 This session offered an overview of rural suicide issues, contributing factors to suicide rates in rural communities, primary care providers’ critical role in suicide prevention, office protocols, and patient screening and risk assessment. Slide deck Recording Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Primary Care Practices: U.S. edition   Part Two Intervention, Follow-up, and Telehealth Tips September 10, 2020 This session covered intervention including medication, safety planning, documentation, and follow-up for patients expressing suicidal ideation as well as tips for helping patients via telehealth.   Slide deck Recording   Trainer Liza Tupa, PhD Technical Trainer, Mountain Plains MHTTC Director of Education and Research, WICHE Dr. Liza Tupa is the Director of Education and Research for the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Behavioral Health Program (WICHE BHP) and a technical trainer for the Mountain Plains MHTTC. A licensed clinical psychologist, her work at the WICHE BHP has included expanding rural psychology internship development to seven western states, behavioral healthcare workforce training, service delivery system and clinical consultation, statewide behavioral health needs assessments, and developing toolkits for Suicide Prevention in Primary Care and School Behavioral Health Advocacy.
Published: August 26, 2020
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