Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
May 24, 2022 Explores singing & song as a simple, free, and effective pathway to foster mental health for mothers with depression and their infants.   To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/ItbpJrylQgg   Presenter:  Elizabeth Brown V. Brisola, PhD is a psychologist, musician, and researcher in the areas of health promotion and mental illness prevention, enthusiastic in fostering creativity and singing in human day-to-day life. She will be sharing her research and publications on mothers’ lived experiences and their meanings. Having completed most of her education in Brazil, she advocates for the Latinx population and participates in Yale’s Latino Colectivo and IRCC-Brazil projects.
Published: May 24, 2022
Print Media
Positive Youth Development (PYD), adopted as a theory in the 1990’s has been used to engage youth, focusing on mutually beneficial relationships within their social worlds, but unabridged, lacks the cultural aspects that can make this practice useful to Black girls. This reference guide addresses varying challenges in the development of Black girls that should be taken into consideration for a more diverse and inclusive use of the practice. In addition, this guide provides examples of programs that are utilizing PYD interventions that consider aspects of development that are unique to Black girls, utilizing “rites of passage” frameworks as the antidote.
Published: April 26, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2022 issue features Women's History Month, the Counselor's Corner blog series, and a complete calendar of events.   
Published: April 1, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2022 issue features Women's History Month, the Counselor's Corner blog series, and a complete calendar of events.   
Published: April 1, 2022
Print Media
The transition to parenthood is a life-changing experience with significant physical and psychological adjustments for the entire family. Many parents experience mood changes and feel overwhelmed during pregnancy and/or after the birth of their child. Many health and mental health care professionals do not receive training on helping new parents identify and manage mental health symptoms. Developed by the MHTTC Network's Perinatal Mental Health Coordination Group, this document is designed to help health and mental health professionals support persons who may be experiencing mental health symptoms and disorders during the prenatal and postpartum periods.
Published: February 4, 2022
Multimedia
Recording of the Rock Recovery-led event, Health at Every Size - The Way to Healing from Diet Culture and Body Dissatisfaction, originally held February 2, 2022.   Presentation slides.
Published: February 2, 2022
Multimedia
  Introduction to Perinatal Mental Health Awareness and Screening - Workshop Wednesday Session Access slide deck by clicking DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording   Session Description Perinatal mental health refers to the mental health concerns experienced by persons during pregnancy and in the first year postpartum. Some of the most common conditions include Baby Blues and Postpartum Depression. Many individuals have risk factors for these conditions, even those who have had "easy" pregnancies in the past! However, many women still feel stigmatized about mental health and often don't discuss their concerns with their providers. This introductory webinar will highlight common perinatal mental health concerns, symptoms, and validated screening tools appropriate for use in multiple settings.    Trainer Maridee ​Shogren DNP, CNM, CLC
Published: November 17, 2021
Multimedia
Recording of the Rock Recovery-led event Group Therapy for the Treatment of Eating Disorders and Body Image Issues, originally held on November 10, 2021.   Presentation slides.
Published: November 15, 2021
Print Media
Latinxs living in the US experience disparities in access and quality of mental health services. The social determinants of health, immigration status, immigration-related trauma, and the cumulative experience of inequality, combined with the vulnerability during pregnancy and postpartum may result in a higher risk for mental health symptoms. Perinatal Mental Health Disorders (PMHDs) is a term used to include the various disorders that can affect individuals during pregnancy and postpartum. This factsheet provides relevant information on cultural considerations for mental health providers working with Latinx populations experiencing or at risk for PMHDs.
Published: July 14, 2021
Print Media
Lxs latinxs que viven en los Estados Unidos experimentan disparidades en el acceso y en la calidad de los servicios de salud mental. Los determinantes sociales de la salud, el estado migratorio, el trauma relacionado con la inmigración y la experiencia acumulada de desigualdad, combinados con la vulnerabilidad durante el embarazo y el posparto, pueden resultar en un mayor riesgo de síntomas de salud mental. Los trastornos de salud mental perinatal (TSMP) es un término que se utiliza para incluir los diversos trastornos que pueden afectar a las personas durante el embarazo y el posparto. Esta hoja informativa proporciona información relevante sobre las consideraciones culturales para los proveedores de salud mental que trabajan con poblaciones latinas que experimentan o están en riesgo de desarrollar TSMP.
Published: July 14, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE In celebration of June as Pride Month, Aleks Martin invites the listener to consider his or her personal definition of diversity, the value of diversity, and ways to lean closer instead of pulling apart when encountering differences. She presents skills for building provider well-being from an inclusion and equity perspective, including multiple dimensions of self-care. This month’s learning goals are: to learn to identify diversity ​in racial and ethnic, socioeconomic, geographic, and academic/professional backgrounds, including different opinions, religious beliefs, political beliefs, sexual orientations, heritage, and life experience; and learn skills from an inclusion and equity perspective. Find out more about the series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES View the webinar recording and access accompanying resources FACILITATOR Aleks Martin (S/he pronouns, but they is ok) has been in the health and social service field for over 20 years. Aleks was drawn to the LGBTQI2+ community in their mid-twenties working for a national HIV-prevention study with youth called, Young Asian Men’s Study (YAMS). This exposed them to the great work of HIV workers from other organizations and how community-based programs are critical in reaching out to the most vulnerable populations. During this time, they worked as a Disease Intervention Specialist with Public Health - Seattle & King County for 7 years, including working on the pilot study for the Rapid HIV Test Kit (then a 20-minute test). A big portion of their professional career was spent at Seattle Counseling Service, a behavioral health agency for the LGBTQ community. From 2003 to 2019, Aleks started as Database Manager, Health Educator, Program Coordinator to Chemical Dependency Counselor and Addictions Program Supervisor. This was the safe space where their yearning for higher education was cultivated so they could serve their community further. As a graduate of the University of Washington’s School of Social Work - Masters Program, Aleks developed their skills as a mental health clinician and social justice advocate. Aleks’ perspectives where shifted and allowed them to have a wider lens for diversity, inclusion and equity. Aleks was inspired to start a private practice to address the special needs of the LGBTQI2+ and BBIPOC (Black, Brown, Indigenous and People of Color), particularly Queer and Trans Asian and Pacific Islander people dealing with unique and special issues that intersect with race/culture and gender/sexuality like coming out, spiritual conflicts, cultural dissonance, gender transition, social navigation at work and other environments, interpersonal relationships from intimacy to friendships, understanding relationships with non-LGBTQI2+ partner(s), and so on. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: July 7, 2021
Presentation Slides
  I’ve Screened, Now What? Perinatal Depression Screening and Response; HHS Region 8 Access slide decks with the green download button above View Recording   Session Description The Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and the South Dakota Department of Health presented a two-hour training session on best practices for depression screening in perinatal populations.     Screening for depression symptoms without established plans for follow-up interventions can create challenges and anxiety for providers working in a variety of settings. This training reviewed best practices when screening perinatal populations for depression, and when needed, how to implement a team-based response to patients expressing thoughts of suicide. This session also examined unique barriers experienced by perinatal persons when seeking care and discuss the importance of referral pathways for connecting individuals to care.
Published: May 17, 2021
Multimedia
Many persons may experience perinatal mental health concerns during the prenatal and postpartum periods. Practitioners play an important role in supporting birthing individuals through the detection, assessment and treatment of perinatal mental health symptoms as well as the delivery of sensitive and culturally competent care. Perinatal Mental Health Learning Series: Strategies and Considerations for Behavioral Health and Health Care Providers is a virtual learning series intended for health and behavioral health providers who work with individuals affected by mental health symptoms during the perinatal period. Expert speakers emphasize increasing awareness and screening methods in perinatal mental health and health care, as well as psychotherapeutic treatment. This is the first session, Awareness and Detection of Perinatal Mental Health Concerns belonging to the 2-part series. Dr. Joia Crear-Perry leads this discussion about the importance of increasing awareness and screening for perinatal mental health concerns. A focus on the disparities and racism experienced by Black women and the subsequent impact on maternal health and mortality, and specifically perinatal mental health, is brought to light during this webinar. Strategies to address these concerns are included.
Published: May 14, 2021
Print Media
Latino communities have been impacted by quarantine and social isolation measures. These measures protect against COVID-19, but in turn, are risk factors for the increase in intimate partner violence (IPV). This factsheet presents cultural factors that differentiate the experiences of Latinas going through IPV compared to women from other cultural groups. Some of the factors include; immigration status, threats of deportation, level of acculturation, and difficulties in seeking the necessary help due to the stigma about receiving mental health services. At the same time, resources are offered such as the Family Preparedness Plan and other web pages dedicated to increasing support for Hispanics and Latinos who go through IPV.
Published: April 28, 2021
Presentation Slides
  Trauma and Intimate Partner Violence Session recording Access Resources Using the Download Link Above This training session was provided to the Cass Clay YWCA team, and their partners, in response to a technical assistance request received by the Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains MHTTC) and Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains ATTC). Dr. Tami DeCoteau, PhD, provided a two-hour training exploring the impact of trauma on victims of intimate partner violence. This session discussed the definitions of trauma, examined the neurophysiology of trauma responses, and modeled best practices for supporting clients and patients who have experienced trauma and intimate partner violence.   To learn more about the work of the Cass Clay YWCA please visit: https://www.ywcacassclay.org/ 
Published: March 19, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
E-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  March 2021 issue features include the Counselor's Corner, a state spotlight on Indiana, and a calendar of events covering March 16-31, 2021. 
Published: March 16, 2021
Multimedia
This one-hour online session will provide information on how to address the impact of COVID-19 prevention efforts, shelter in place practices, and isolation for individuals who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in Latino/Hispanic communities. The presenter will describe socio-cultural Latino traditions and the impact of COVID-19 shelter in place practices that may increase IPV incidents, recognize the mental health consequences of unemployment, economic hardships, the closing of schools, and general uncertainty that may result in more family conflicts and violence. Furthermore, Dr. Lopez, will provide information about the identification of cultural resilience and coping strategies to address the impact of the pandemic in Latino families and ways to reduce stress and IPV. The presenter will review Spanish bilingual and culturally adapted domestic violence prevention resources available through the internet, online technology, local and national hotlines.
Published: May 7, 2020
Print Media
Statistics show that up to 20 percent of women develop a perinatal mental health illness, such as depression or anxiety, either during pregnancy or within a year of giving birth. This fact sheet provides information about postpartum depression (PPD), and explains why women of color are more at risk for developing PPD.
Published: February 28, 2020
Print Media
  Gender Violence among Latinas: Key Concepts and Cultural Considerations provides mental health clinicians an understanding of the main factors that influence Latina's vulnerability to experience gender-based violence. It also includes clinical recommendations for mental health providers and organizations.   This product explains the impact of gender and domestic violence among Hispanic and Latinas, describes the difference between domestic violence and intimate partner violence, and how cultural values like marianismo and machismo embedded in Hispanic and Latino populations could exacerbate differences in the role between males and females. Many Latinas may confront struggles regarding power balances due to their gender, and factors like immigration, anti-immigrant environments, low income, and cultural values might influence this. 
Published: January 23, 2020
Multimedia
On September 10th, Suzan Mullane, MSEd., Research Associate and Trustee, Center for Educational Improvement, discussed how research has shown that children with mental, behavioral, and developmental disorders and their families face personal, financial, and neighborhood challenges more often than families of children without these disorders. These challenges may make it harder for some parents to give their child the resources they need to thrive. The type of community that families live in, urban versus rural, may increase these challenges. She also addressed better access to mental health care for children and parents in rural areas. To download the slides, click here.   
Published: September 26, 2019
Multimedia
The National Hispanic and Latino Mental Health Technology Transfer Center is proud to present Mental Health Bytes; a series of short videos discussing mental health topics around Hispanic and Latinos.   We know that you are busy, that is why we are giving you bytes of information to be acquainted for and for your clients.   In this video, Dr. Zayas shares valuable insight on young Latinas regarding suicide attempt, and some strategies that you can implement as providers.  If you want more information here are some resources:   Zayas, L. (2011). Latinas attempting suicide: When cultures, families, and daughters collide. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.    Zayas, L. (2015). Forgotten citizens: Deportation, children, and the making of American exiles and orphans. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.   If someone needs help you can share the Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 (English) 1-888-628-9454 (Spanish).
Published: May 13, 2019
Curriculum Package
  It is estimated that 14-23% of women will experience depressive disorders during pregnancy; many of which will be misdiagnosed, undiagnosed and go untreated. This slide deck provides a brief overview of perinatal depression. An accompanying podcast enhances the slide content. To have the slides automatically advance in line with the presentation:       Select “Slide Show” from the menu bar Select “From Beginning” Once playing, do NOT advance slides on your own or the recording will stop Authors Maridee Shogren
Published: April 30, 2019
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