Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Face-to-Face Training
This training is now at full capacity. Stay tuned for future in-person opportunities! Event Description This two-day in-person training provides a neurodevelopmentally informed approach to better understand student behavior and performance. This training is intended to assist school mental health professionals and educators to understand the impact that stress has on a child’s brain so that they can become trauma-sensitive and ultimately provide effective supports to their students. Agenda: Day One: Explore sequential development and skill building Breaking down the six components necessary for optimal learning environments   Day Two: Breaking down the six components necessary for optimal learning environments (continued) Identifying and creating student interventions and strategies that align with concepts learned in the training   The participant is responsible for all travel, meals, and lodging costs. While lodging accommodations cannot be provided by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, the Residence Inn by Marriott is located directly across the street from the WICHE offices. Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to modify current student strategies to align with the modes of regulation. 2. Participants will practice utilizing state-dependent behavior intervention plans. 3. Participants will do an audit of current strategies in their area of practice regarding components of neuroplasticity. Trainer Jessica Pfeiffer, PsyD., PCSY, LCSW Jessica Pfeiffer, PsyD, NCSP, LCSW is the Founder of Intricate Roots and a consultant with the Neurosequential Network. Over the last 16 years, Dr. Pfeiffer has provided keynote presentations, trainings, consultations, coaching, and observations to educational systems around the world. She focuses on embedding a neurobiological lens in the school settings and providing recommendations that are developmentally relevant for students and staff. Dr. Pfeiffer is co-host of Education Suspended, a podcast focused on engaging in conversation with guests who are passionate about evolving our educational system. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado, Denver, in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development. She completed her undergraduate degree in Social Work at Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. She received her Master of Social Work degree and Animal Assisted Social Work Certificate from the University of Denver. Dr. Pfeiffer received her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in School Psychology at the University of Colorado, Denver.
Webinar/Virtual Training
About this Event: Georgia has had a reputation for being a standard bearer of peer support for many years, and that reputation has been on display over the past 36 months with the launch of the new national 988 and 988lifeline.org. In this series, '988 in Every State', presenters will explore the range of peer recovery-oriented responses and/or responders associated with local, statewide and national crisis response teams, warmlines and recovery centers.   Learning Objectives: · Identify the different types of responders and community resources. · Describe what a recovery-oriented Crisis Intervention Team looks like. · Understand and describe the goals of a crisis response team.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
To be effective and efficient, organizations must provide their services in ways that do not inadvertently re-traumatize the teams of workers providing support to their clients. Becoming trauma-informed means adapting practices, policies, physical spaces and more to make services more accessible for everyone, including the workers. This is very important when working on a team, some of whom likely have lived experiences of trauma. This class helps learners conceptualize the nature of this problem and offers practices that reduce the risk of re-traumatization.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Review the impacts of trauma exposure in behavioral health work Consider the mechanisms of re-traumatization in the workplace Assess areas of trauma-informed practice using various assessment tools Examine trauma-informed team competencies   CONTINUING EDUCATION: Registrants who fully attend this training will be eligible to receive 2 continuing education (CE) hours certified by the Minnesota Board of Social Work. CE certificates are provided by People Incorporated Training Institute.   PRESENTER: Russ Turner, MA, Director of the People Incorporated Training Institute During Russ’s 16-year tenure, he has written and taught thousands of hours of person-centered curriculum to help people become more effective helpers, communicators, and leaders. His audience includes workers and leaders across a wide range of organizations from human services, healthcare, and libraries, to law enforcement and corrections. He trains trainers, works with management, and has consulted and coached on training projects across multiple sectors of the economy. He has worked as an educator for three decades in a variety of countries and settings including Japan, the Czech Republic, and the UK. His teaching philosophy is that adults learn best when they are challenged, the material is applicable to work situations, and sessions are interactive and engaging.     This training is provided by our valued partners at the People Incorporated Training Institute. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis (CBT-P) is an evidence-based approach to support recovery for individuals experiencing psychosis. Case conceptualization can guide CBT-P individual treatment and team-based treatment in a multidisciplinary setting, such as a First Episode Psychosis (FEP) team. In these monthly case-based learning calls, First Episode Psychosis (FEP) Team Leads and Therapists in MHTTC Region 6 will practice using case conceptualization models for young people on their FEP teams. Each month, up to two providers will have the opportunity to present their case conceptualization and receive feedback from the group. Providers will be asked to submit their case conceptualization one week in advance of the call. Samantha Reznik, PhD, will facilitate the calls. Although the calls will practice using a CBT-P case conceptualization, other modalities may be integrated as clinically indicated by the conceptualization and an emphasis will be placed on shared decision-making and recovery-oriented approaches. Participants should expect to learn basic theory of CBT-P case conceptualization rather than to be competent in provision of full CBT-P. Further CBT-P training options will be discussed during the series.   Facilitator Samantha Reznik is the current research postdoctoral fellow with the Advancing the Early Psychosis Intervention Network in Texas (EPINET-TX) project at the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health (TIEMH), University of Texas at Austin. She has specialized in providing recovery-oriented services to individuals diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI) and other underserved populations. She completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Arizona. She trained in Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis (CBT-P) at the Early Psychosis Intervention Center (EPICenter) in Tucson, Arizona. She completed an advanced clinical fellowship in rehabilitation and recovery for SMI at VA San Diego Healthcare System/University of California San Diego (VASDHS/UCSD), where she expanded her training in CBT-P and learned how to integrate Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy (CT-R). She also completed a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-funded clinical internship at University of Kansas Medical Center to specialize in working with underserved populations.   Positionality statement:   I have been passionate about CBT-P since I saw how it can be used to effectively partner with young people in service of recovery. One important area of non-expertise in my use of CBT-P is that I do not have lived experience of psychosis or participating in CBT-P. Having a positionality as only provider rather than receiver of services, I am mindful that lived experiences may or may not align with the evidence base of CBT-P. I work to honor each individual’s lived experience of participating in CBT-P by sharing and collaboratively building any case conceptualizations and partnering in setting goals and techniques. I apply CBT-P flexibly and use CBT-P case conceptualization to guide therapy, which often incorporates strategies from other modalities.
Meeting
The Region 6 Peer Support Advisory Committee (PSAC) to the South Southwest MHTTC meets on a monthly basis to collaborate across the states and tribal communities to identify and address common areas of need and share resources. Based on feedback from the PSAC, and needs identified by peers across Region 6, the MHTTC organizes training and technical assistance focused on peer retention and workforce development. This is a closed meeting.
Virtual TA Session
Support for Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) is an evidence-based intervention focused on managing the distress that results from exposure to trauma. It is designed to be implemented by teachers or school counselors with small groups of students. In January we trained a cohort of 20. There are 4 following TA Calls to go in depth with case consultation and problem-solving. This SSET training is specifically for non-licensed educators, school counselors, or nurses. This is a closed training. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
This event is part of the UW SMART Center's 2024 Virtual Speaker Series. Learn more and register for upcoming events in the series here. Please Note: Certificate of Attendance and Washington state clock hours will be available for attendees of the live session. Bullying Prevention in Elementary and Middle Schools: Leveraging Experts in Your Building When: Wednesday, April 17th @ 10 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. AKT | 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. PT | 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. MT Description: Session attendants will learn about the types of bullying, strategies to disrupt bullying in schools, and focus specifically on how to leverage school resource officers, bus drivers, and other safety personnel in your bullying prevention efforts. About the Presenter: Sara McDaniel, Ph.D. Professor of Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Multiple Abilities, and Director of the Center for Interconnected Behavioral and Mental Health Systems at the University of Alabama Dr. McDaniel is a professor of Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Multiple Abilities at the University of Alabama and is the Director of the Center for Interconnected Behavioral and Mental Health Systems (CIBMHS). The CIBMHS is a research center that engages in rigorous research in schools and focuses on supporting schools and districts in implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and school-based mental health services. Dr. McDaniel conducts research and teaches in the areas of: (a) PBIS, (b) classroom management assessment and coaching, (c) Tier 2 social, emotional, and behavioral supports, and (d) preventative treatments for diverse populations of students placed at high risk.     Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Online Course
Event Description Reducing access to lethal means, such as firearms, can determine whether a person at risk for suicide lives or dies. This session will provide rationale for lethal means safety, recommendations on who and when should receive lethal means safety information, and an introduction to lethal means counseling for Veterans at risk for suicide. In addition, the session will provide information on basic firearm safety and safe storage practices.  Trainers Chad Pitts & Sarah Kemp-Tabbut Chad Pitts is a Veteran of the U.S. Army with over 10 years of organization and program management experience. He is currently the Program Manager for ND HOPES, a suicide prevention project in Western ND focused on Veterans, LGBTQIA2S+ youth, and rural residents. Chad has previously held positions within the NDUS focused on equity and diversity initiatives for disproportionately affected populations including LGBTQIA2S+ and Veterans. While in the Army Chad served as the Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge for multiple domestic and global missions with the 82nd Airborne Division.   Sarah Kemp Tabbut is the Community Engagement and Partnerships Coordinator at the Fargo VA.  She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 8 years of hands-on and public health experience in mental health and suicide prevention.  Sarah is well-versed in suicide prevention best practices, including safety planning, lethal means safety, and community-based interventions and is a Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) Trainer.  She also partners throughout North Dakota with communities to create and strengthen community coalition efforts for mental health, suicide prevention, and Veteran/Military issues. 
Webinar/Virtual Training
By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to describe: The nature of insight and treatment engagement in psychotic disorders An overview of the causes of impaired insight and treatment engagement in psychotic disorders.  Approaches to management of impaired insight and treatment engagement/alliance in psychotic disorders.   Presenter: ​​Dr. Keshavan is Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, as well as Academic Head of the department. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Schizophrenia Research (Elsevier) and serves on the editorial board for journals such as Early Intervention in Psychiatry and Asian Journal of Psychiatry. His main areas of research include the neurodevelopmental basis of schizophrenia, neuroimaging, and early intervention. He has an active clinical practice.   This webinar will be co-hosted by the Massachusetts Psychosis Network for Early Treatment (MAPNET, www.mapnet.online). If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest MHTTC is excited to partner with Rebekah Demirel, L.Ac MPCC, to offer a live learning community about leadership and advocacy through a polyvagal lens. 6 hours of CE contact hours available* (see below.) ABOUT THE LEARNING COMMUNITY Advocating as a behavioral health professional often involves making difficult decisions, which don't always feel good, and can be a struggle to release at the end of the day. While away from work, our minds may still be full of the day's details, and when we go back, it’s like we never left. A mind that never rests equals a nervous system that never rests, which can lead to emotional and mental burnout. Learning and operating from a Polyvagal perspective, we can become more aware of our nervous system responses and cultivate skills for more clarity and confidence. Starting with increased awareness, we can gain a sense of agency, connection and safety with others and most importantly, with ourselves. This is a dynamic trauma-informed learning community for behavioral health professionals who care deeply about what they do, yet want to feel supported, safe, stable and connected. Participants will learn about how humans operate, while befriending our nervous systems and strengthening our resolve to effect systemic change. Learning Objectives: - Identify nervous system phases related to Polyvagal theory - Identify personal nervous system patterns - Develop skills to balance and calm a dysregulated nervous system - Cultivate broader awareness and connection with others - Discover newfound mental health resilience through self-inquiry Eligibility Members of the mental health/behavioral health workforce who are based in the states of Alaska, Oregon, Idaho & Washington (HHS Region 10) Commitment to attend the whole series is required Each individual must have access to computer/web camera/audio to participate Seats are limited, and applications are due by Friday, April 5. We will notify you of your application status by April 10. Questions: For questions about this series, including eligibility and registration please contact the Northwest MHTTC at [email protected]. SESSIONS: Wednesday, April 17 - May 8, 2024  12:30-2:00 pm AK / 1:30 - 3:00pm PT / 2:30 - 4:00pm MT Session 1 (April 17): Advocacy Beyond Burnout – A Polyvagal Perspective  Learning Objectives: Gain confidence in understanding polyvagal terminology  Recognize personal neuro-patterns    Apply polyvagal principles to advocacy work  Resources: Slides Session 2 (April 24): TBA Session 3 (May 1): TBA Session 4 (May 9): TBA FACILITATOR Rebekah Demirel, L.Ac MPCC Rebekah Demirel L.Ac. MPCC, is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs, with more than a decade as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years as a paramedic trainer, eighteen years of mental health counseling experience, specializing in traumatic stress, and she is a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss. *Continuing Education Contact Hours Details Physicians, physician assistants, primary care ARNPs, psychologists, and other health care providers may be eligible for CME or CEUs for completing the course. Retain your Certificate of Completion and verify its suitability for CME/CEUs with your licensing/credentialing entity. The University of Washington is an approved provider of continuing education for DOH licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, psychologists, substance use disorder professionals, nurses and physicians under the provisions of: WAC 246-809-610, WAC 246-809-620, WAC 246-811-200, WAC 246-840-210, WAC 246-919-460 and WAC 246-924-240.
Webinar/Virtual Training
  The Person-Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) Consultation Corner is a 6-month learning series featuring a monthly webinar on the “FAQs” of PCRP; offering practical tools and resources to support quality PCRP at the level of both individual service delivery and organizational systems change; and providing follow-up “office hours” through smaller-group technical assistance for webinar participants who wish to take a “deeper dive” on a given topic. The topic for webinar session 2 is "Co-Creation of the PCRP Document-Partnering, Goal Discovery & Emphasis on Real Life Results." At the end of the series, participants will be able to: Define PCRP and its essential elements Increase familiarity with existing and emerging state and federal requirements regarding PCRP Articulate a minimum of three differences between traditional methods of treatment planning and best-practice PCRP Learn more about how the MHTTC PCRP Consultation Corner series can provide tools and resources to support the implementation of PCRP at your organization   While the Consultation Corner’s webinar series is open to a national audience, priority for technical assistance office hours following this webinar session on April 17 will be given to webinar participants from the New England (Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Rhode Island, New Hampshire) and South Southwest (Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas) regions.     Presenters: Janis Tondora and Amy Pierce   Janis Tondora, Psy.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine.  Her work involves supporting the implementation of person-centered practices that help people with behavioral health concerns and other disabilities to get more control over decisions about their services so they can live a good life as they define it. She has provided training and consultation to over 25 states seeking to implement Person-Centered Recovery Planning and has shared her work with the field in dozens of publications, including her 2014 book, Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health: A Practical Guide to Person-Centered Planning. Janis’ consultation and publications have been widely used by both public and private service systems to advance the implementation of recovery-oriented practices in the U.S. and abroad. She is a life-long resident of Connecticut where she lives with her husband and beloved labradoodles after recently becoming an empty-nester with two children in college.   Amy Pierce (she/her) is an international trainer and consultant has been working in the Peer Movement in the State of Texas for over two decades. She currently serves as Recovery Institute Associate Director at Via Hope by serving as a subject matter expert on the implementation of peer services and other recovery-oriented practices. She has extensive experience in the peer support sector, having started the first peer support program in the state hospitals in Texas, working as a peer support worker in a community mental health agency, and working as the Program Coordinator for a transitional peer residential housing project.   This series is co-sponsored by the New England and South Southwest MHTTCs. More information about the series.   Continuing Education Units for this event are offered by the Office of Professional Development, Steve Hicks School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin: · Social Work · Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) · Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)   Continuing Education Units for this event are offered by the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health/South Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, The University of Texas at Austin as recognized by the Texas Certification Board: · Mental Health Peer Specialist (MHPS) · Recovery Support Peer Specialist (RSPS) · Re-Entry Peer Specialist (JI-RPS) · Peer Specialist Supervisor (PSS) · Certified Family Partner (CFP)   These entities are recognized as providers of continuing education credits, however, attendees are responsible for checking with their licensing or credentialing board to ensure acceptance of the CEUs issued. If you have questions about CEUs for a credential that you do not see listed here, contact [email protected].     If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.    
Webinar/Virtual Training
WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2024 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. PT [Find your local time zone here] Workshop 5 of 6 in the "Trauma-Informed, In School Sessions" Workshop Series (view series page for full details) "You Can Talk to Me": A Family Guide to Support Students' Mental Health and Well-Being Trauma Informed Principle to Practice: Trustworthiness & Transparency, Collaboration & Mutuality How might we partner with parents, caregivers and families through trauma informed approaches to support the mental health and well-being of the children and teens in their lives? In 2023, Project Cal-Well (a cross-agency mental health initiative led by the California Department of Education to promote mental health awareness and wellness among California's K-12 students) designed the Family Guide to Supporting Young People’s Mental Health and Well-Being for parents and other caregivers (available in English and Spanish), with input from families, educators, mental health professionals, and youth. By sharing tips for families on how to have conversations about social media use, mental health, anti-LGBTQ experiences, bullying and more, this guide provides parents and other caregivers with information and easy-to-use strategies to support their children’s overall well-being and mental health.   How did the guide’s authors partner with students and their families to create this guide? How might we support students and families to dig into its information and leverage this resource to partner with parents and other caretakers? Join us to explore these questions, and the guide itself, while learning from several of its authors about how the guide’s development process was trauma informed.   Participants will: (1) learn about the development and content of the guide; (2) have the opportunity to consider how to get the guide and related local resources into the hands of families; and (3) generate ideas for how to use individual sections of the guide to align with a school’s continuum of trauma-informed approaches and social, emotional, and behavioral supports.   Audience:  Educators, school site leaders, school mental health professionals, youth advocates, trauma-informed professionals, family and caregivers, family mental health advocates, technical assistance providers, and anyone interested.   Faculty Hilva Chan, MSW, is an Education Programs Consultant with the California Department of Education. Hilva has extensive experience coordinating and managing programs promoting youth resiliency and wellness both at the state and local levels, and has managed several federal grants addressing school safety, positive school climate, and student mental health. She is currently the program director for two mental health projects, Project Cal-STOP and Project Cal-Well, and oversees the statewide implementation of the California School Climate, Health and Learning Surveys.     Kenwyn Derby, MSW (she/her) is a Senior Research Associate at WestEd. Kenwyn partners with educators, policymakers, and community members at local and state levels to generate and apply evidence to improve student outcomes, with a focus on supporting the whole child, increasing family engagement, and improving school climate and culture. Her work, from coaching school teams to facilitating LEA improving networks, emphasizes equitable access and outcomes for all K–12 students and their families. She is a co-author of the Project Cal-Well Family Guide to Supporting Young People’s Mental Health and Well-Being: Information, Tips, and Resources. Kenwyn holds master’s degrees in organizational psychology and social work. She is also a part-time practicing clinical social worker in a community-based mental health agency.     Lisa Howard, is a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) coordinator for the Del Norte County Office of Education in California. She is the county lead for the Community Schools Partnership Program, Learning Communities for School Success Program as well as the CalHOPE, Project Cal-Well, and Mental Health Awareness Training grants. With 25 years of teaching experience, adapting new resources to meet the needs of students and their families is her strength. As part of her family engagement work, Lisa adapted the Family Guide to Supporting Young People’s Mental Health and Well-Being into a learning experience for families to increase their knowledge and access to mental health resources in schools and the community. Implementing these practices, she has found success connecting public agencies, private providers, nonprofit, tribal and community-based organizations with families in need.     Natalie Romer, Ph.D (she/her) is a Senior Program Associate in WestEd’s Resilient and Healthy Schools and Communities content area. She leads and supports state and federally funded projects that include technical assistance, research, evaluation, and training focused on developing effective and efficient systems to support the social and emotional well-being and mental health of school communities. Natalie has been supporting Project AWARE (Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education) SEA programs since 2013. She provides technical assistance to Project Cal-Well and is a co-author of the Family Guide to Supporting Young People’s Mental Health and Well-Being: Information, Tips, and Resources. Natalie is also a licensed psychologist, nationally certified school psychologist, and board-certified behavior analyst.       Priming Materials   Derby, K., Romer, N., & McCullough, S. (2023). Family guide to supporting young people’s mental health and well-being: Information, tips, and resources. WestEd. Derby, K., Romer, N., & McCullough, S. (2023). Guía familiar para apoyar la salud mental y el bienestar de los jóvenes: Información, consejos y recursos. WestEd.    
Webinar/Virtual Training
DESCRIPTION Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects individuals from all racial and ethnic backgrounds, including the Black community. However, there are unique challenges and considerations when it comes to autism in the Black community. It is important to recognize and address these factors to ensure that families receive access to care, appropriate treatment, support and understanding. This webinar is in recognition of Autism Acceptance Month (April), which promotes the inclusion and acceptance of individuals diagnosed with ASD.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Cite statistics and prevalence Explain cultural awareness and recognition of autism in Black Communities Identify disparities and barriers to access, diagnosis and treatment Name solutions to barriers   PRESENTER LaKisha Mamon, MD is an Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychiatrist who serves as the Director of Child and Youth Services at Metropolitan Human Services District in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Mamon holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Xavier University of Louisiana and a medical degree from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. She completed her adult internship and residency at the Louisiana State University/Ochsner Adult Residency Program in New Orleans and completed an additional 2-year fellowship in Child and Adolescent Training at LSU. She is also a trainee of the Harris Program for Infant Mental Health. Dr. Mamon has special interests in early childhood intervention and the impacts of systemic inequity on children and families.    HOST Annelle Primm MD, MPH is the Senior Medical Director of the Steve Fund, an organization focused on the mental health of young people of color. She is also a member of the Black Psychiatrists of America Council of Elders.   AUDIENCE Mental health professionals, behavioral health professionals, general public, education professionals, speech therapists   This webinar is part of the Health Equity Webinar Series, an ongoing collaboration between the Central East MHTTC and the Black Psychiatrists of America to increase education and awareness surrounding mental health in the Black community. View past webinars in the series 
Webinar/Virtual Training
Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working within schools and school districts and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world while decreasing negative physical, emotional, and psychological outcomes. This webinar will also focus on existing policies within school systems and assess how those policies impact access to equitable and high quality mental and behavioral health care for communities of color. Attendees will walk away with strategies for how to discuss these topic areas with their students and how to support students who are coping with complex cultural issues in developmentally appropriate ways.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define racial stress and trauma and Provide examples of how racial stress and trauma can occur in schools Identify the systems & policies within schools that impact student health and wellness Understanding the role of implicit bias in school systems & policies   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTERS: Nicole L. Cammack, PhD Dr. Nicole L. Cammack is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Media Contributor, and the Founder, President and CEO of Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Howard University and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University. Lastly, she completed a specialized Postdoctoral Fellowship, with the National Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine. Dr. Cammack is passionate about mental health awareness, treatment, and reducing the mental health stigma, particularly as it relates to Black communities. This passion is what led to the development of Black Mental Wellness, Corp an organization of clinical psychologists passionate about shifting the narrative of mental health in the Black community. In addition, she is a co-author of, Healing Racial Stress Workbook for Black Teens: Skills to Help You Manage Emotions, Resist Racism, and Feel Empowered. Her work has been featured in Huffington Post, Essence, People, Thrive Global, Good Housekeeping, Salesforce, and Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature). In addition, she was recognized as a 40 under 40 Honoree with the Leadership Center for Excellence and recognized through her work at Fort Meade and the Department of the Army with an Achievement Medal for Civilian Service. Danielle R. Busby, PhD Dr. Danielle Busby is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Author, Educator, and Co-Founder and Vice President of Professional Relations of Black Mental Wellness Corp. She received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the George Washington University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship, with a child trauma specialization, at Duke University’s Medical Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at Michigan Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Busby is passionate about decreasing barriers to mental health service use for underserved patient populations and is committed to continuously bridging the gap between research and clinical practice. Her research and clinical work are centered on examining barriers to mental health service use, specifically among Black youth who are at an elevated risk for suicide. She has led and contributed to scholarly articles and research on child trauma, youth suicide prevention, racial discrimination among Black youth, and the psychological effects of neighborhood stressors, such as, community violence exposure among Black adolescents. Dr. Busby and her work has been featured in NBC News, People, Women’s Health, Parents, Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature), PsychAlive, and WJLA news. Additionally, she is an awarded recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. She is a proud member of the American Psychological Association’s Leadership Development Institute, SelfSea Digital Wellbeing Advisory Board, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she has served for over 15 years. Dr. Busby was born in Detroit, MI and raised in Southfield, MI. She loves early morning yoga, college football Saturdays, and traveling with her close family and friends.   This event is being held in partnership with Black Mental Wellness.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Event Description This presentation will define and describe adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and review the substantial empirical evidence on their mental and physical health effects. Multiple ways of understanding and assessing for ACEs will be discussed, as will how to identify and address them in clinical practice.    Trainer Melanie Wilcox Dr. Melanie Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Public and Preventive Health, and Department of Psychiatry at Augusta University. She is also a licensed psychologist and board certified in counseling psychology and works part-time in private practice providing both therapy and assessment via telehealth. Her clinical areas of expertise include culturally responsive and trauma-informed care as well as substance abuse and addiction. Her research focuses on culturally response and antiracist psychotherapy and training, racial and socioeconomic inequity in higher education, and racial and social justice more broadly. She is in her final year as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, which she chaired in 2020, and is currently President Elect-Elect of APA Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
  This is session 4 of the Mindful Monday series, running from March 11 to May 20. Event Description We are excited to announce that Christina Ruggiero, RP, is returning to lead our first Mindful Monday series, Mindful Monday – Experiential Mental Health Practice, for Spring 2024. Join us as we continue to explore and experience different mindfulness practices related to the topics of creativity, rest, and self-care. This series is for anyone who desires to improve their overall well-being, resilience, and mental health.  The practices that are presented in the training are designed for quick and effective implementation both personally and professionally.  For mental and behavioral health practitioners these techniques can be easily incorporate into their practice.  Mindfulness practices are varied and can last anywhere from a couple of minutes to an hour or more. Vishen Lakhiani, Meditation Expert and CEO of Mindvalley, states “You can take a one- to three-minute dip into peacefulness, and you can see remarkable results. The biggest benefits are going to happen in the first few minutes.” Attendees who have participated in past Mindful Monday series have the following to say about the training: “Incredibly validating experience”, “Love doing this- can we do it indefinitely”, “Thank you for this training. It is hard to recognize we also deserve to be heard, have needs/wants and slow down and breathe for a while.” This is a 30-minute interactive training that begins on March 11th and will run every other week through May 20th, 2024.  Each training will feature exercises from different mindfulness disciplines. At the beginning of each session, participants will spend a few minutes grounding and learning about the practice for that day and then spend approximately 15-20 minutes in experiential practice, leaving a few minutes at the end for reflection and discussion. Trainer Christina Ruggiero Master’s Counselling Psychology  Registered Psychotherapist
Face-to-Face Training
To submit an application for this year’s Academy, please visit: https://wiche.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsdO6srzwrH9BvvkMVcw44BxaZGB9UzLTT  Application Schedule:  Application Deadline: March 22, 2024  Notification of Acceptance: March 29, 2024  2024 Mountain Plains Leadership Academy – Program #24CE0009 Session 1 _ The Heart of Leadership April 22, 2024 – April 25, 2024 · Boulder, CO  Session 2 _ The Business of Leadership September 23, 2024 – September 25, 2024 · Boulder, CO Target Audience: This accredited continuing education activity is designed for directors, supervisors, upcoming supervisors in the Behavioral Health, and Substance Use Disorder fields. Global Objectives: Forge meaningful mentorship relationships with experienced leaders in the field of rural behavioral health and substance use disorder management.  Identify your own leadership style, recognizing strengths and areas for development.  Discuss how to nurture high-performing individuals within your team.  Implement strategies to cultivate a supportive and positive leadership culture within your organization.    Leadership shortages in the rural behavioral health and substance abuse workforces continue to pose significant challenges for individuals and their communities throughout HHS Region 8 states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.   The Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Center (MHTTC) Leadership Academy was formed to address these gaps and for the past five years, the Academy has served the rural behavioral health workforce and their communities by providing provided customized training to effectively meet leaders where they are and provide them with a map that helps them navigate the leadership challenges they have taken on.  This year, in response to both participant feedback from the 2023 Leadership Academy, and shared concerns about the escalating impact of opioid and stimulant abuse throughout rural communities in our region, we have reformatted the Academy to offer a 6-month Leadership Intensive experience to providers in HHS Region 8 states, working in the behavioral health, mental health, and substance abuse fields.  This intensive is the result of a collaboration between the Mountain Plains MHTTC and the Mountain Plains Rural Opioid Technical Assistance Center (ROTAC).    This collaboration allows us to expand our training offering to include two in-person events, with a training curriculum that addresses both the soft and hard skills needed to be an effective leader, one-on-one coaching, group mentoring, and ongoing monthly training.   Below is a preview of the 2024 Mountain Plains Leadership Academy Schedule:   April 22, 2024 – April 25, 2024 · Boulder, CO  Session 1 _ The Heart of Leadership Some of the topics we’ll cover include Interpersonal Style, Leadership Skills and Competencies, Situational Leadership, and Building Strong Teams.  APRIL 22nd – Afternoon & Evening Group Get Together – Introductions Group Dinner – Chautauqua, Boulder, CO  APRIL 23rd – Day 1 Continental Breakfast Provided Morning Session Lunch Provided Afternoon Session  APRIL 24th · Day 2 Continental Breakfast Provided Morning Session Individual Mentoring Sessions Lunch Individual Mentoring Sessions Afternoon Session  Monthly Trainings (1 hour) – May | June | July | August Monthly Mentoring (1 hour) Individual Mentoring or Group Mentoring (1 – 2x | month) – May | June | July | August | September   Session 2 _ The Business of Leadership Some of the topics we’ll cover include Leadership and Management Skills, Cultural Competence, Ethical and Legal Considerations, and Collaboration and Networking.  September 23, 2024 – September 25, 2024 · Boulder, CO  SEPTEMBER 23rd – Afternoon & Evening Group Get Together Group Dinner – Chautauqua, Boulder, CO  SEPTEMBER 24th – Day 1 Continental Breakfast Provided Morning Session Lunch Provided Afternoon Session  SEPTEMBER 25th – Day 2 Continental Breakfast Provided Morning Session Lunch Afternoon Session – Wrap-Up Who We’re Looking For:  New and emerging rural leaders working in the behavioral health and/or substance abuse & treatment fields in the HHS Region 8 states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.    Must be working in a leadership position.   Twenty participants are willing to commit to full participation in the 6-month intensive program.  What We Offer:  A free, customized curriculum adapted to meet the unique needs of rural leaders and facilitated by trainers in the behavioral health and substance use disorder fields, as well as private and public sector fields, with extensive leadership experience.   Continuous on-going support for the full 6-month period.  8.25 APA and LADC credits are available for Session 1. Credits for Session 2 are pending.  Travel, lodging, and all meals (excluding dinner on Tuesday evening 4/23 and 9/23) will be covered, per WICHE travel policy.  Applicants will receive more detailed information upon acceptance.   To submit an application for this year’s Academy, please visit: https://wiche.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsdO6srzwrH9BvvkMVcw44BxaZGB9UzLTT  Application Schedule:  Application Deadline: March 22, 2024  Notification of Acceptance: March 29, 2024    ACCREDITED CONTINUING EDUCATION  In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by University of Nebraska Medical Center and Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE). University of Nebraska Medical Center is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.  PSYCHOLOGISTS/LICENSE MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS   Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs. This activity has been approved for 8.25 credit hours of continuing education credit.    LADC  This activity meets the criteria of an approved continuing education program for Licensed Drug and Alcohol Counselors (LADC). 
Webinar/Virtual Training
The School Health Assessment and Performance Evaluation (SHAPE) System is a public-access, web-based platform that offers schools, districts, and states/territories a workspace and targeted resources to support school mental health quality improvement.  SHAPE was developed by the National Center for School Mental Health (NCSMH), in partnership with the field, to increase the quality and sustainability of comprehensive school mental health systems. SHAPE houses the National School Mental Health Census and the School Mental Health Quality Assessment (SMH-QA).  These measures are designed for team completion at the school or district level to document the school mental health system components, assess the comprehensiveness of a SMH system, prioritize quality improvement efforts and track improvement over time. Join us as the NCSMH walks through a high-level overview training of the SHAPE system. See how to login, complete the assessment, and what an outcome report looks like.
Webinar/Virtual Training
United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. and New England MHTTC would like to invite you and your staff to attend "Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance: Wise Practices," a Tribal Behavioral Health ECHO webinar series. Native Psychological Brilliance refers to the intelligence, strengths, balance, innate resources, and resilience of Native people. April's topic is titled "Home Base- Supporting Native Veterans." This no-cost telehealth series will be held on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am Pacific/12:00 pm Mountain/1:00 pm Central/2:00 pm Eastern. Each session will be one hour in length and will provide an opportunity for participants to:   Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens   The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music video and Native spoken word performances as part of each session. Who should attend? Tribal health directors, clinic staff, counselors, social workers, physicians, nurses, Tribal Epidemiology Center staff, and anyone supporting Tribal communities through the health or behavioral health sector are welcome to join. Continuing education credits will be provided.   If you would like accommodations to participate in any of our events, please contact us at [email protected] ahead of the event date. For example, if you would like an ASL interpreter, please let us know 3 weeks ahead of the event date so we have sufficient time to secure the services.  
Presentation
April 24 - 26, 2024 The 22nd Annual NWPBIS Conference will be held April 24 - 26, 2024 at the Tacoma Convention Center, Tacoma WA Join Educators and Experts from all over for the longest running PBIS conference in the country. Set in the beautiful Pacific Northwest at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center, come for 2-3 days of learning, networking, and camaraderie. Workshops will be scheduled on Wednesday, April 24th and exist as a stand-alone registration option or an add-on to the general conference. General sessions will be scheduled on April 25 and 26 in several strands, including Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3, Mental Health, Equity, and Capacity Building. For more information & registration click here > KEYNOTE: Dr. Grafenreed is a Licensed Psychologist (LP) and a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP). Despite her educational attainments and accolades, Dr. Grafenreed considers herself first an educator, having spent nearly 30 years in education as a School Psychologist. Dr. Grafenreed has served Houston area school districts for 24 years, as a School Psychologist, and later as an Education Specialist at Region 4 Education Service Center in the Department of Special Education Solutions. While at Region 4, the largest Education Service Center in Texas, Dr. Grafenreed led the Texas Behavior Support (TBS) Network, a Texas Education Agency with the goal of building capacity in Texas schools for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). During her tenure at Region 4, she helped develop the Texas Equity Summit, an annual conference designed to address key issues related to school discipline, equity, school climate, and PBIS as the lead for the TBS Network. Dr. Grafenreed also created the Region 4 Equity Collaborative, which was designed for leaders of districts and charter schools that had been identified as “Significantly Disproportionate” in discipline. The Equity Collaborative introduced district and charter school leaders to educational equity and equity literacy as a tool to address and eliminate disproportionality in school discipline. Dr. Grafenreed currently serves as a Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator at the University of Washington’s School Mental Health Assessment, Research, and Training (SMART) Center. Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Understanding service animals, Emotional Support Animals, and the law in Washington State for tenants is the focus of this 90-minute webinar. ABOUT THIS EVENT Service animals, trained to handle different tasks for their person, have been a boon for disabled persons for decades. In this presentation, we will examine and explain what makes an animal a service animal pursuant to Washington and Federal law. Service animals perform different functions than Emotional Support Animals (ESA)s. ESAs are protected, but to a lesser extent, under Washington law, and ESAs provide tangible benefits to persons in need of emotional support. A tenant cannot be excluded from housing on the basis of a service animal or an ESA, but there are additional steps needed to protect tenants seeking housing with an ESA. There are no additional requirements regarding a service animal, except possibly educating housing providers. Responsibility for the service animal and the ESA’s conduct remains squarely with the tenant, and we will discuss what this means. The Northwest MHTTC is proud to offer this webinar in partnership with the Tenant Law Center. FACILITATORS Elizabeth Powell, Staff Attorney Elizabeth Powell has been actively practicing law since she was admitted to the Washington Bar in 2000. She volunteered for the King County Housing Justice Project for years and took the knowledge she gained representing tenants facing evictions into her private practice, where she litigated well over a thousand cases in the last 23 years. She was solo counsel on Thoreson Homes v Prudhon, a Div I published decision which reversed the trial court. She has presented at CLE’s geared towards landlord-tenant litigation and has assisted with litigation and/or settlement of housing cases all over the state. She has handled grievance hearings with PCHA, THA, SHA, and KCHA. She has litigated matters involving the WSLAD, the ADA and service animals, and reasonable accommodation.      Kasey Burton, Senior Staff Attorney Kasey Burton is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Tenant Law Center, which provides eviction prevention and tenant advocacy services to King County. Kasey has spent several years practicing landlord-tenant law as both a right-to-counsel attorney for tenants facing eviction and providing eviction prevention assistance, which has allowed her to pursue her passion for housing justice.  Kasey attended the University of Washington for both her Bachelor’s in Political Science, with a minor in Law, Societies, and Justice, and her Juris Doctorate. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of Colorado Denver and hopes to use this degree to facilitate her engagement in policy change that provides Washington citizens who are tenants or unhoused with the protections they deserve.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
 While the NIH has identified sexual and gender minorities as well as racial and ethnic minorities as groups that are facing health disparities, what is often overlooked in research and clinical care are the people living at the nexus of those two communities. Health disparities are a particular type of difference in health in which disadvantaged social groups, such as people from lower social, economic status, racial, ethnic minorities, women, sexual minorities and other groups, have persistently experienced social disadvantage or discrimination and have systematically experienced worse health or greater health risks than more advantaged groups as a result of systems of oppression. An intersectionality framework can have a meaningful impact and potentially better outcomes in behavioral health care. This presentation will offer tools for behavioral health professionals.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe how systems of oppression such as racism and heterosexism create unique health disparities (e.g., addiction and behavioral health care inequities) encountered by LGBTQ+ People of Color. Individuals will also learn ways to increase their cultural humility in working with Queer People of Color.   CONTINUING EDUCATION Participants who fully attend this training or webinar will be eligible to receive 1 hour of continuing education (CE) certified by the Illinois Certification Board (ICB). CE certificates will be managed by the hosting agency and/or ICB.   PRESENTER Dr. David G. Zelaya (he/him/él) is an Assistant Professor at Brown University School of Public Health within the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, he is a research fellow at Harvard Medical School within the Department of Psychiatry, and an affiliated scientist at Yale University with the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. Dr. Zelaya received his Ph.D. from Georgia State University in counseling psychology, he was a psychology resident at Harvard Medical School's Cambridge Hospital, and he completed his fellowship within the Alcohol Research Center on HIV at Brown. His program of research focuses on examining health disparities, from an intersectionality and minority stress lens, among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and sexual and gender minority communities and links to HIV risk, mental health, and substance use. Dr. Zelaya is the PI of an NIH funded K23 career development grant aimed to develop a behavioral health intervention for Latinx queer individuals to decrease hazardous alcohol use by targeting intersectional forms of discrimination. Clinically, he is interested in providing culturally competent behavioral health services to historically underserved communities (e.g., Spanish-speaking Latinx people; sexual and gender diverse people). He has been the recipient of numerous social justice awards, his research has been published in the flagship journals of his field, and he serves on the editorial board for the Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity journal. At Brown, Dr. Zelaya teaches Introduction to Health Disparities.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Description: With increasing overdose rates, a more lethal drug supply, and more prescription medications in many homes, it’s important to educate a wider audience about harm reduction and what it means: essentially, reducing the negative consequences of potentially risky behaviors. This workshop will present different definitions of harm reduction, highlight how we all practice harm reduction in our lives, and explain how harm reduction strategies are implemented in different settings, including syringe service programs and psychotherapy. It will also address community concerns and hesitations about harm reduction, ways to reduce the harms of stigma surrounding drug use, and opportunities to build bridges between harm reduction and treatment for people with substance use disorders Goals: Increase participants’ understanding of harm reduction principles and strategies, address myths and misperceptions about harm reduction, and explore how harm reduction can be part of the continuum of care. Workshop Outline: Different ways of defining harm reduction (National Harm Reduction Coalition, SAMHSA, NIDA). Harm reduction principles. How we all practice harm reduction (including bike helmets, sunscreen, designated drivers). Harm reduction services provided by syringe service programs (SSPs), overdose prevention centers (OPCs) and mobile units in some communities. Who harm reduction services may not be reaching (different population groups). Harm reduction psychotherapy (key practitioners and principles, including embracing goals like reduced substance use). Hesitations about harm reduction (traditional objections, like it “enables” drug use, vs. newer concerns, e.g. it’s “not enough” for people with complex needs). Building bridges between harm reduction and treatment for people with substance use disorders. Reducing harm by addressing stigma (types of stigma, avoiding stigmatizing terms). Trainer Bio: Susan Stellin, MPH is a writer, educator, and public health consultant focusing on health-centered responses to substance use and addiction. Since earning a master's in public health at Columbia University, she has worked on projects about ways to reduce overdose deaths, reform punitive drug policies, and expand access to harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support. Recent clients include NYU Langone’s Health x Housing Lab, the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Technology Transfer Center, the Opioid Response Network, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Overdose Prevention Program at Vital Strategies, and the Vera Institute of Justice. She regularly leads training workshops for service providers working with people experiencing substance use, mental health, and housing challenges, and has also taught undergraduate courses about media ethics, collaborative storytelling, and the history of journalism. Other Session in this Series: Session 1: Addressing Myths About Substance Use, Addiction, Treatment, and Recovery Session 2: Current Substance Use Trends and Evolving Risks Session 4: Understanding Addiction and Options for Care
Webinar/Virtual Training
WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2024 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. PT [Find your local time zone here] Workshop 6 of 6 in the "Trauma-Informed, In School Sessions" Workshop Series (view series page for full details) The Heart Work: Equity-Centered Coaching Practices for Trauma Informed Collegiality and Collective Healing Trauma Informed Principle to Practice: Cultural Humility As systemic inequities and trauma are often intertwined, addressing their connection becomes crucial in trauma-informed school communities. Centering equity in every student interaction and adult partnership supporting the school system is essential. The capacity for the adults responsible for implementing trauma-informed practices grounded in equity is nurtured through equity-centered coaching.   In this workshop, we will explore the principles of equity-centered coaching to cultivate trauma-informed school environments. Coaching conversations, grounded in active listening, cultural humility, and psychological safety, model the equitable interactions we hope administrators have with educators and providers so that educators and providers can offer the same experience with their students.   Together, we will examine our own identities, assumptions, patterns, and beliefs - creating space for new perspectives. This self-reflection enables us to recognize how inequities and trauma manifest in our schools. As we build self-awareness about our experiences and worldviews, we become better able to perceive concerning dynamics and interrupt cycles of harm.   This workshop invites us to envision the trauma-informed and healing-centered schools we desire – places where adults possess the tools to nurture their well-being and fully empower students. We will review evidence-based tools, rationale, and resources to foster cultural humility, mitigate systemic barriers, and build trusting partnerships across the school community.     Audience:  Educators, school site leaders, school mental health professionals, youth advocates, teacher educators, school mental health graduate school educators, higher education administrators, and anyone interested in equity centered coaching in school cultures.   Faculty Melissa Smith, M.S. (she/hers) is the newest member of the Pacific Southwest MHTTC team. As a licensed collegiate and postgraduate professional, Melissa comprehends the immense influence education can have on cultivating safe, inclusive, and engaging learning spaces that amplify voices which often go unheard. As a licensed collegiate and postgraduate professional, Melissa understands education's profound impact on ability to challenge existing norms and perceptions, amplifying the voices of those from marginalized communities.   As a Change Consultant with Change Matrix, Melissa crafts transformative learning experiences that foster personal and professional growth. Her commitment extends beyond conventions as she envisions landscapes where everyone feels valued, heard, and empowered to thrive. She uses her scholarly knowledge to create safe, inclusive, and engaging learning environments.  Her methodology empowers people and organizations to question the status quo, utilize data-driven insights, and take tangible actions to create more equitable and inclusive environments.   A passionate professional with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and a Master of Science in Reading from Radford University, Melissa encourages us to move beyond comfort zones to dismantle systemic barriers hindering social, emotional and mental health.     Priming Materials   Equity-Centered Trauma-Informed Education (Equity and Social Justice in Education) (Paperback) | Phoenix Books Anchor Competencies Framework    
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