Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
Please note: This recording will be available until July 13, 2024.   “There is no health without mental health.”  – World Health Organization (WHO) The notion of integrated care in the field of healthcare has evolved over time. Historically, integrated care referred to the integration of mental health and addictions treatment, which is now called behavioral health. Today, integrated care refers to the integration of behavioral health and physical health. Integrated care is a best practice for supporting person-centered holistic healthcare due to the use of interprofessional collaboration with a focus on achieving the Quintuple Aim in healthcare. There is an expanding lens of integrated care beyond biomedicine that incorporates co-production of knowledge. This 90-minute virtual session will cover what constitutes integrated care, the shift from fee-for-service to value-based care, the collaborative care model, resource hubs, practice frameworks, and expanding perspectives on this evolving approach to care.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Be able to define integrated care within the context of mainstream medicine Learn about the Collaborative Care Model as an integrated care best practice Understand integrated care practice frameworks and expanding care perspectives   PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: June 12, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The June 2024 issue features content celebrating Pride Month, PTSD Awareness Month, and Intersection of Addiction and Racism: A Curated Bibliography‒a new comprehensive resource created by AMERSA, the ATTC NCO, and the PTTC NCO. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: June 6, 2024
Multimedia
Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale   PRESENTERS: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.   The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: June 6, 2024
Multimedia
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare providers found themselves abruptly thrust into the world of telehealth services delivery. As agencies, clinicians, and clients increased the use of these new technologies and methods of clinical practice and collaboration, an apparent need for ethical best practices within this modality arose. This presentation will emphasize ethical best practices using technology and telehealth, ethical responses to unique challenges faced by clients and providers using this modality, and ethical concerns unique to using virtual methods in clinical practice.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this educational activity, learners will be able to: Identify ethical concerns specific to virtual service delivery in their clinical practice. Identify ethical responses to challenges associated with the use of virtual technologies. Identify and mitigate limitations in the use of technology and virtual platforms in their work.   PRESENTER:  Dr. Jill D. Stinson is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She received her dual doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Psychology, Policy, and Law from the University of Arizona prior to serving as the Director of Sex Offender Treatment at Fulton State Hospital with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Her teaching focuses on professional ethics, forensic psychology, and psychological assessment, while her research focuses on serious mental illness, personality disorders, self-regulatory problems, and histories of early childhood maltreatment in persons who have committed violent and sexual offenses, as well as issues related to community re-entry, stigma, and suicidality in justice-involved populations. Dr. Stinson has authored three books related to etiology and treatment of sexual offending and motivation to engage in therapy. She is the incoming Editor-in-Chief for Sexual Abuse, Chair of the ETSU Campus IRB, and Secretary of the Board of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 22, 2024
Multimedia
  This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and communities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy, participants will learn: Key strategies for effective behavioral health advocacy Skills to engage using these key strategies   TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT   PRESENTER: Marilyn Sampilo, PhD, MPH, is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in integrated behavioral health and health disparities among minority populations. She received her PhD in clinical child psychology with an emphasis in pediatric psychology from the University of Kansas and a Master of Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical Center, both of which allowed her to specialize in physical and mental health promotion and prevention efforts to address health disparities among underserved populations. She has extensive experience in the cultural adaptation of treatment and interventions for Hispanic/Latinx children and families and in community engagement and advocacy for this target population. She is currently a Psychologist in the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at Cleveland Clinic, leads the Center’s health equity and social justice initiatives, and is a consultant and trainer on issues of diversity and cultural proficiency.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 14, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
  Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working with their students and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world. We will discuss how implicit bias may influence and impact expectations and interactions with youth. Participants will walk away with strategies to discuss these important issues with youth and learn how to support students as they encounter racism and racial trauma.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify the impact of racial stress and trauma. Explore the impact of prejudice, bias, and privilege. Discuss strategies to support students who are impacted by racial stress and trauma   PRESENTERS: Jessica S. Henry, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist in Washington, DC, Maryland, and Georgia. She is the cofounder and vice president of program development and evaluation for the Black Mental Wellness Corp., and founder and CEO of Community Impact: Consultation & Psychological Services—a trauma-informed organization whose mission is to provide trauma-informed services to individuals and organizations affected by traumatic events. Henry is the previous senior director of behavioral health for one of Washington, DC’s largest Federally Qualified Health Centers, clinical director of a level-5 close security male prison and Georgia’s largest youth homeless shelter. Overall, Henry is passionate about the mental health of individuals in Black and under resourced communities and has specialized in increasing access to treatment and providing the highest quality of evidence-based mental health treatment services to underserved youth, families, and adults exposed to traumatic events (e.g., community violence, abuse, neglect). She received her BS from Howard University, MA from Columbia University, and PhD in clinical psychology from The George Washington University. She is from the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. For more information about Henry, please visit BlackMentalWellness.com or ImpactTheCommunity.com. She can also be found on Instagram @BlackMentalWellness or @CommunityImpact_CP. Dana L. Cunningham, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and cofounder and vice president of community outreach and engagement at Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She is also program director at the National Center for School Mental Health in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Cunningham is passionate about increasing access to culturally responsive and antiracist mental health care for underserved youth and uplifting the voices of marginalized populations. Cunningham also authored a children’s book, A Day I’ll Never Forget, to support children who have been impacted by the incarceration of a loved one. Additionally, Cunningham owns a private practice in the greater Washington, DC area, where she resides. Cunningham received a BA in psychology from Spelman College and obtained her MA and PhD in clinical psychology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. To learn more about Cunningham, please visit BlackMentalWellness.com. This training is in partnership with Black Mental Wellness. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 2, 2024
Multimedia
  The goal of this webinar is to advance practitioners’ knowledge of and sensitivity to Judaism and the greater Jewish community. Judaism is not only a religion, but a culture as well, and this presentation will highlight the diverse range of Jewish identity and expression. We will discuss Judaism’s values, beliefs, traditions, rituals, and worldviews will be discussed and how these cultural elements manifest in everyday life. This is an important training for those who work closely with the Jewish community, have clients with Jewish family members, and/or for those who are interested in increasing their cultural competency of Judaism and Jewish Communities in general.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: At the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to: Identify several Jewish identities and their expression in everyday life Apply new strategies when working with individuals from the Jewish community Summarize cultural-specific issues that may arise when working with Jewish clients Identify Jewish myths and stereotypes and also recall factual data and statistics related to the Jewish population   PRESENTER: Moshe Moeller, PhD Moshe Moeller, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in cross-cultural fatherhood, parenting, couples, family and group therapy, and paternal mental health. He is an Attending Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Moeller is currently the Associate Program Director of Montefiore's Supporting Healthy Relationships and HERO Dads programs. These are two family strengthening programs funded by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance (OFA), Health Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) grants. Over the past decade he has been conducting and presenting fatherhood and relationship education research an has been providing clinical services for fathers and families from diverse backgrounds. Dr. Moeller received his bachelor's degree in psychology from Queens College and his master's and doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology from Adelphi University, Gordon F. Derner School of Psychology. He also received his First Talmudic Degree from Sh'or Yoshuv Institute. He has specialized training in psychodynamic therapy, Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT) and Gottman Method Couple Therapy and is a Certified PREP 8.0, Nurturing Fathers, and 24/7 Dad Facilitator. Outside of work he enjoys playing piano, spending time outdoors, reading, cooking, painting, and spending time with his family. Dr. Moeller and his wife live in Stony Point, NY with their 3 children.   This training is provided by our valued partners at the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 30, 2024
Multimedia
  In this training, you'll gain knowledge, practical communication strategies, and insights into cultural nuances to help you navigate interactions with respect and understanding. The workshop also explores current political and humanitarian issues impacting the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, fostering your awareness of the complex realities individuals and communities are facing. You’ll acquire valuable tools to enhance your ability to provide culturally competent services and contribute meaningfully to the well-being of the Middle Eastern community.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES Develop culturally sensitive communication skills to effectively engage with Muslim individuals within the Middle Eastern community. Identify cultural nuances and sensitivities within the Middle Eastern community that may impact social work practices and interventions. Gain an understanding of the political and humanitarian issues affecting the MENA region.   PRESENTER Jasmin Abu-Hummos, MSW, LSW and Walaa Kanan, MSW, LSW Jasmin Abu-Hummos is a Palestinian American licensed social worker who has been practicing social work for four years. She is the founder of Yusuf Mental Health, a mental health agency that provides services to the underserved population of Arabic-speaking and Muslim individuals in Ohio. Jasmin also works per diem at Toledo Hospital in their pediatric psychiatric unit. Outside of work, Jasmin dedicates her time to initiatives around the city that educate underserved communities about de-stigmatizing mental health. She also serves as an advocate for human rights and equity initiatives globally.   Walaa Kanan is a master's level licensed social worker currently providing therapy through private practice. Wall is a second generation, immigrant and proud Palestinian who utilizes her cultural background to inform her practice. Wall's focus with clients revolves around trauma, gender-based, violence, relationship dynamics, and working through a decolonizing lens. Outside of work, Wall serves as an advocate attempting to bring attention to the various issues she is passionate about, including consent, equal access, and liberation.     This training is provided by our valued partners at the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities. The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 30, 2024
Presentation Slides
Determinants of health are varied and many, encompassing biological, social, structural, environmental, legal, and political determinants. In combination, these determinants bridge downstream and upstream locations; for example, from the clinic office to the school classroom to state-specific legislation. This 90-minute virtual session will cover the many determinants of health, their definitions, related impacts and outcomes, and current interventions, such as social prescribing and CARE courts. We will also discuss the range of competence and importance of advocacy through a trauma-informed lens to advance holistic health for collective benefit.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants will: Gain an understanding of the varied and many determinants of health Identify interconnections and impacts among multiple determinants of health Learn current interventions and what is important to help close gaps in care   PRESENTER: Jean Balestrery, PhD Jean E. Balestrery holds a Joint PhD in Social Work and Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MA in Anthropology from University of Michigan, a MSW from University of Washington and a BA from Brown University. Dr. Balestrery is founder and CEO of Integrated Care Counsel, LLC, a Spirit of Eagles Hampton Faculty Fellow and a licensed independent behavioral health clinician. An interdisciplinary scholar-practitioner with more than twenty years of combined experience in research, training and practice, Dr. Balestrery has presented research nationally and internationally with a focus on holistic health and wellbeing across the life course. Dr. Balestrery is currently a National Association of Social Workers Committee Member for LGBTQ+ Issues, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Grant Reviewer and Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Co-Production of Knowledge discussion participant.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 26, 2024
Multimedia
Research has indicated that youth may experience racism, prejudice, and bias as early as preschool. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their experiences of working within schools and school districts and learn strategies to help students navigate a culturally complex world while decreasing negative physical, emotional, and psychological outcomes. This webinar will also focus on existing policies within school systems and assess how those policies impact access to equitable and high quality mental and behavioral health care for communities of color. Attendees will walk away with strategies for how to discuss these topic areas with their students and how to support students who are coping with complex cultural issues in developmentally appropriate ways.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define racial stress and trauma and Provide examples of how racial stress and trauma can occur in schools Identify the systems & policies within schools that impact student health and wellness Understanding the role of implicit bias in school systems & policies   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   PRESENTERS: Nicole L. Cammack, PhD Dr. Nicole L. Cammack is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Media Contributor, and the Founder, President and CEO of Black Mental Wellness, Corp. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Howard University and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University. Lastly, she completed a specialized Postdoctoral Fellowship, with the National Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine. Dr. Cammack is passionate about mental health awareness, treatment, and reducing the mental health stigma, particularly as it relates to Black communities. This passion is what led to the development of Black Mental Wellness, Corp an organization of clinical psychologists passionate about shifting the narrative of mental health in the Black community. In addition, she is a co-author of, Healing Racial Stress Workbook for Black Teens: Skills to Help You Manage Emotions, Resist Racism, and Feel Empowered. Her work has been featured in Huffington Post, Essence, People, Thrive Global, Good Housekeeping, Salesforce, and Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature). In addition, she was recognized as a 40 under 40 Honoree with the Leadership Center for Excellence and recognized through her work at Fort Meade and the Department of the Army with an Achievement Medal for Civilian Service. Danielle R. Busby, PhD Dr. Danielle Busby is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Author, Educator, and Co-Founder and Vice President of Professional Relations of Black Mental Wellness Corp. She received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan and her Master’s and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the George Washington University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship, with a child trauma specialization, at Duke University’s Medical Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at Michigan Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Busby is passionate about decreasing barriers to mental health service use for underserved patient populations and is committed to continuously bridging the gap between research and clinical practice. Her research and clinical work are centered on examining barriers to mental health service use, specifically among Black youth who are at an elevated risk for suicide. She has led and contributed to scholarly articles and research on child trauma, youth suicide prevention, racial discrimination among Black youth, and the psychological effects of neighborhood stressors, such as, community violence exposure among Black adolescents. Dr. Busby and her work has been featured in NBC News, People, Women’s Health, Parents, Rally Up Magazine (Cover feature), PsychAlive, and WJLA news. Additionally, she is an awarded recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. She is a proud member of the American Psychological Association’s Leadership Development Institute, SelfSea Digital Wellbeing Advisory Board, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she has served for over 15 years. Dr. Busby was born in Detroit, MI and raised in Southfield, MI. She loves early morning yoga, college football Saturdays, and traveling with her close family and friends.   This event is being held in partnership with Black Mental Wellness.   The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 18, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The April 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating National Minority Health Month and Alcohol Awareness Month. It also features links to upcoming trainings focused on supporting Black students experiencing racial trauma, harnessing AI for substance misuse prevention, and process improvement. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
This 3-part learning series is intended for individuals working in behavioral health who are interested in building skills that will help increase their engagement in advocacy efforts promoting Hispanic and Latino behavioral health equity. This series will begin with an overview of the importance of advocacy for promoting equity, will transition to skill-building for advocacy, and end with developing action plans for engaging in advocacy. The goal of this series is to better equip and prepare behavioral health workers to advocate for behavioral health equity for Hispanic/ Latino clients and communities at the local, state, or federal. After the 3-part webinar series, an optional follow-up learning collaborative of non-profit organizations from Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI) will share about how they are advocating for Latino communities.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity, participants will learn: Why advocacy is critical to social justice and behavioral health equity for marginalized communities What are the barriers and facilitators to engaging in advocacy   TRAINING SCHEDULE: Session 1, The Role of Advocacy in Promoting Behavioral Health Equity: April 9, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 2, Skill-Building for Advocacy: May 14, 12:00–1:30 PM CT Session 3, Action in Advocacy: June 25, 12:00–1:30 PM CT
Published: April 9, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating Women's History Month and National Social Work Month. It also features updated versions of the Sustainability Planning in Prevention Guidebook and Sustainability Planning in Prevention Toolkit, as well as upcoming trainings focused on provider well-being and culturally responsive services for Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) clients. As always, you will also find links to all scheduled events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC! Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: March 18, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The February 2024 issue features content from the Great Lakes ATTC celebrating Black History Month, including our upcoming 2024 Black History Month Panel Presentation. It also features a new educational brief on health equity in crisis systems, upcoming prevention trainings on drug trends in the region, and updates to the Classroom WISE curriculum for 2024. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: February 12, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The January 2024 issue features the third installment of the Counselor's Corner blog series: Integrating Spirituality and Counseling with African American Clients, information on the Opioid Response Network's 2022-2023 regional summits, and a call for applications for the upcoming HEART (Healing Ethno And Racial Trauma) Training for Behavioral Health Providers Serving Hispanic & Latinx Communities intensive training series. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: January 11, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The December 2023 issue shares recorded content on wound care and xylazine, social media basics for preventionists, an infographic on providing behavioral healthcare to people living with HIV, and SAMHSA's tips for supporting your mental health through the holidays. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: December 7, 2023
Print Media
Rates of behavioral health needs are higher for people living with HIV (PLWH) and those at risk of acquiring HIV than the general population. Current research indicates PLWH are twice as likely to have a behavioral health condition than the general population. For this reason, our partners at Vivent Health have created this new infographic highlighting some basic information about integrated care for PLWH that providers need to know.
Published: December 1, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November 2023 issue honors National Native American Heritage Month, National Homelessness Awareness Month, and a brand-new Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intensive technical assistance opportunity. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: November 7, 2023
Multimedia
  RECORDING: Collaboration for High Quality School Mental Health Services: Effective Partnering with Families and Advocates   Effective family-school collaboration has consistently been shown to enhance child and family outcomes. Caregivers know their children best and are well-equipped to serve as equal members of school teams that support their children and communities. Additionally, federal law and professional ethics necessitate the full participation of families in many school-based processes. Unfortunately, many school-based providers struggle to meaningfully collaborate with families due to competing demands and a lack of understanding around best practices in family engagement and legal requirements. Family advocates provide necessary support to families as they navigate complex school and community resources and can support schools in effective collaboration. In this webinar, participants will learn about effective family-school partnership practices, which will include an outline of procedures that necessitate caregiver involvement, specific family engagement strategies, and community resources for families and professionals.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Demonstrate effective family-school partnership practices Develop appropriate procedures for caregiver involvement Identify specific family engagement strategies and community resources     PRESENTERS: Miranda Zahn, PhD, NCSP, is an Assistant Professor of School Psychology at the University of South Dakota. She conducts research, training, and technical assistance in school-based mental health services. Specifically, Miranda focuses on social justice and the role of teachers in school supports for youth mental health. In addition, Miranda is a school psychologist and school mental health provider at Nebraska’s Educational Service Unit #1, where she provides direct services to youth as well as training and systems consultation to schools.     Lisa Sanderson has served as Project Director for the statewide Family to Family Health Information Center at South Dakota Parent Connection since 2008, also home to the state’s OSEP funded Parent Training and Information Center. She has worked with systems and families across South Dakota for over 25 years, serves as USD Faculty for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Program, and is the CDC's Act Early Ambassador to South Dakota (2018-2024). Lisa has a Bachelor of Science degree, maintains licensure by the SD Board of Social Work Examiners, and was a certified educator for many years. Lisa is a parent and grandparent of children with exceptional needs.       The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: October 31, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The October 2023 issue honors National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, National Youth Substance Use Prevention Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, World Mental Health Day (October 10), and the newest installment of the NIATx in New Places blog series on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
    The Great Lakes MHTTC's training series, Applying Culturally Responsive and Trauma-Informed Care at the Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health is now available in an online flipbook! Peruse this digital collection to access webinar recordings, practitioner resources, and evidence-based recommendations for providing culturally responsive and trauma-informed care to those experiencing mental illness and trauma as a result of intimate partner violence (IPV) and/or domestic violence (DV).       TRAINERS Cathy Cave, Senior Training Consultant, The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Cathy Cave has more than 30 years’ experience as an administrator, facilitator and consultant specializing in cultural inclusion, equity, anti-racism work and disparities elimination, trauma informed services and supports, organizational development, supervisory practice and leadership coaching within child welfare, juvenile justice, disaster response, health care, mental health, and substance use services. She is one of New York State’s early trauma champions, coordinating county collaboratives and clinical training trauma conferences. For the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, Cathy is engaged in internal and external planning, development, and change initiatives. She provides in-person and virtual training, TA, and curriculum development supporting programs, coalitions, other technical assistance centers, governmental bodies and community-based organizations. Since 2012 as a Senior Training Consultant with NCDVTMH, she utilizes her survivor, family, community and administrative perspectives to facilitate organizational change to improve service quality at local, state and national levels.   Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network Rachel Ramirez is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.   Victoria “Tori” Wynecoop-Abrahamson, Training and Technical Assistance Manager at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Victoria “Tori” Wynecoop-Abrahamson (she/her) is a citizen of the Spokane Tribe located in Eastern Washington State and the Training and Technical Assistance Manager at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health (NCDVTMH). She began her advocacy journey during her undergraduate career at Illinois College by establishing a sexual assault support group in response to the #MeToo movement. After graduation, she returned home to the Spokane Indian Reservation and worked as a Domestic Violence Advocate providing assistance to survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, teen dating violence, stalking, and elder abuse. Assistance for survivors often included accessing resources for civil and criminal court cases, mental health support, and substance use services. This position encouraged Tori to pursue and complete a Master of Social Work at the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. Prior to joining NCDVTMH, Tori provided SAMHSA-funded training and technical assistance to tribal communities and nations with a focus on building program capacity and sustainability in the areas of suicide prevention, substance use, and mental health.   Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Gabriela Zapata-Alma is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a Lecturer at the University of Chicago, where they direct the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Training Program. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence and their traumatic effects through innovative and evidence-based clinical, housing, resource advocacy, peer-led, and HIV-integrated care programs. Currently, Gabriela authors best practices, leads national capacity-building efforts, and provides trauma-informed policy consultation to advance health equity and social justice.  
Published: September 26, 2023
Multimedia
  RECORDING: The Importance of Dual Recovery   September is National Recovery Month – a time when those affected by substance use disorders (SUDs) come together at rallies, parades, and parties to share knowledge, experiences, and hopes for the future. This month also commemorates those we've lost and celebrates those who are traveling on or seeking out their own journey of recovery.    Substance use disorders and mental illness overlap at the rate of 50–70%. Despite this significant overlap, there is often not enough attention paid to co-occurring mental health concerns or dual recovery within SUD treatment. This presentation is an informational celebration of dual recovery.      LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In this webinar, participants will learn: Help clients define dual recovery for themselves Help clients improve the quality of life in recovery Articulate the tenants of person-centered recovery Recognize seven varieties of recovery experiences Help clients identify purpose in recovery Create ideas to celebrate dual recovery     PRESENTER: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the State Project Manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC and PTTC. Mark has worked for 40 years as a social worker, educator, and part of the SUD workforce. He is founder of the Online Museum of African American Addictions, Treatment and Recovery and co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery-oriented high school in Illinois. Mark is also an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, and the British Islands.    Recently, Mark Sanders was named as the 2021 recipient of the NAADAC Enlightenment Award in recognition of his outstanding work and contributions to NAADAC, the field of SUD services, and SUD professionals. He is also the recipient of the Illinois Association for Behavioral Health’s 2021 Lawrence Goodman Friend of the Field award in honor of the many years of dedicated service Mark has provided to communities throughout his home state of Illinois.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: September 26, 2023
Print Media
Many practitioners know "the basics" of virtual treatment and seek support in improving their effectiveness & strategies. This desk guide provides resources, information, and quick tips for practitioners working with youth in virtual settings.  This guide was created by WAFCA with funding from the Great Lakes MHTTC and is based on material presented by Lisa Anderson, LPC, CSW, in spring 2021.
Published: September 12, 2023
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