Products and Resources Catalog

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Print Media
  Internal Family Systems (IFS, sometimes nicknamed "Parts Work") is an evidence-based model of psychotherapy that acknowledges that the mind naturally contains multiple parts with different purposes, needs, and stories. When our inner parts feel safe and have their concerns addressed, our core self knows how to heal, allowing us to become integrated and whole. Today, IFS has a legacy of effectiveness in the treatment of trauma and in addressing a variety of mental health concerns. This guide was created by WAFCA with funding from the Great Lakes MHTTC and is based on material presented by Dr. Frank Anderson on March 23, 2023 for WAFCA-CE.   WAFCA serves as the Wisconsin partner for the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: August 15, 2023
Print Media
Counselors have the privilege of working with individuals and families from various backgrounds; intersecting identities; and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. Deliberately incorporating culturally responsive care in mental health settings can help ensure that individuals have access to treatment that meets their needs. This guide was created by WAFCA with funding from the Great Lakes MHTTC and is based on material presented by Dr. Patricia Arredondo on February 17, 2022, for WAFCA-CE. WAFCA serves as the Wisconsin partner for the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: August 15, 2023
Print Media
Understanding the essential pieces to effective treatment is beneficial for new and seasoned counselors alike. In each session and with each client, mental health providers work to do many things at once: build rapport, practice active listening, navigate triggers and distractions for themselves and clients, create an environment of safety, provide support and regulation, monitor time, and more. This guide was created by WAFCA with funding from the Great Lakes MHTTC and is based on material presented by Kelli Underwood on June 8, 2023, for WAFCA-CE. WAFCA serves as the Wisconsin partner for the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: August 15, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The August 2023 issue honors International Overdose Awareness Day (August 31), opioid overdose prevention training on HealtheKnowledge, and the newest NIATx in New Places series blog post written by Lynn Madden, PhD, MPA.  And as always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: August 3, 2023
Print Media
  The Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC are dedicated to integrating cultural responsiveness into all our training and technical assistance offerings. We aim to help develop workforce competencies to provide equitable and inclusive care to all. Download this guide to learn more about our growing inventory of evidence-based trainings designed to improve the delivery of culturally-responsive prevention, treatment, and recovery approaches!   If you have questions about the culturally-responsive trainings we currently offer or suggestions for additional culturally-responsive trainings that would support the behavioral health workforces in our region, please contact:  Alfredo Cerrato, Senior Cultural & Workforce Development Officer ([email protected])
Published: July 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The July 2023 issue honors National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month and World Hepatitis Day (July 28) by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features newly released episodes from the Checking-In Podcast that focus on PTSD treatment providers' self-care and a new HealtheKnowledge course developed by the Great Lakes ATTC: NIATx Change Leader Academy: Rapid-Cycle Change for Teams.    As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: July 3, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Marco Torrez-Miranda shares his insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods he uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Marco Torrez-Miranda, MSSW, LCSW Marco Torrez-Miranda is a licensed psychotherapist and substance use disorder specialist in the state of Wisconsin. He earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and is currently a doctoral candidate focused on social justice and equity in higher education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Marco’s personal and professional experience has centered around being and working with minoritized individuals and communities. He has developed interventions and programming to increase access, engagement, and healing from racialized trauma. He has more than 15 years of experience working in the behavioral health field as a clinician, clinical supervisor, mentor, consultant, director, and faculty. Most recently, Marco serves as the Equity & Inclusion Faculty Director for the newly established Institute for Equity & Transformational Change (IETC) for Madison College. The IETC promotes, studies, and implements inclusive excellence and anti-racist practices to create an affirming learning community. Please Note: The views expressed herein are those of Mr. Torrez-Miranda and do not necessarily reflect the views of Madison College. Connect with Marco on LinkedIn to learn more about him and all the great work he's doing!   You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Linda Bartoli shares her insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods she uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Linda Bartoli, LCSW Linda Bartoli is the founding director of Pivot Collaborative (Chicago, IL) and has worked as a trauma-informed therapist for 20 years. Linda has built a diverse group practice of passionate, inclusive, and curious care providers—people who like to challenge and support clients and organizations through times of change and who are queer or queer allied. As a queer therapist herself, she prioritizes inclusivity in her practice and focuses on helping others with issues related to life changes, race, gender, identity, adoption, loss, grief, trauma, depression, and anxiety. Her therapeutic style is best described as interactive, direct, mindful, and attuned. Linda also has advanced training in conflict management and group facilitation, as well as advanced certifications in trauma-informed work. Additionally, she is a qualified leadership coach and has a diploma in Organizational Development and Executive Coaching, which she received in London. Learn more about Linda's work at Pivot Collaborative!   You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Leonna Jackson shares her insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods she uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Leonna Jackson, MSW, LISW, LICDC Leonna Jackson is a licensed clinical social worker and trauma-informed therapist who is trained in eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. Leonna has extensive experience working with adults, children, and couples, and clients describe her therapeutic style as personable and nonjudgmental. She currently practices at The Heart's Haven Counseling in Toledo, OH, specializing in the treatment of anxiety, depression, trauma, marriage therapy, and substance use disorders. Leonna is dedicated to always providing client-centered care, and she and the rest of the amazing team of therapists working at The Heart's Haven are ready and willing to help clients navigate through the process of healing. Learn more about Leonna's work at The Heart's Haven Counseling!   You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Worsham El shares her insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods she uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Leonna Jackson, MSW, LISW, LICDC Worsham El is a licensed clinical social worker, a certified family trauma professional, and a certified trauma-sensitive yoga facilitator. As the CEO and co-founder of Lotus Trauma Care, she is committed to enhancing the resiliency of youth, adults, families, and professionals. Worsham El's gratitude for her large family fuels her passion to promote safe and strong social support systems for youth and communities. Her experience in the fields of child welfare, substance use, and domestic violence ignites her fire to empower professionals, families, and communities. In practice, Worsham El provides innovative trauma therapy and consulting services, and she has trained over 2,500 professionals in trauma-informed care. Populations Most Served: Victims of domestic violence, sexual/physical/emotional abuse, neglect, and people with substance use disorders. Specializations/Expertise: PTSD, complex trauma, developmental trauma, historical trauma, traumatic loss, grief, youth/adolescent therapy, family therapy, parent/caregiver consulting, trauma-informed care, program/curriculum development.   Learn more about Worsham's work at Lotus Trauma Care, including the ⁠training & consultation services⁠ and ⁠trauma yoga classes⁠ they have to offer. More information about trauma-sensitive yoga:     You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Gabriela Zapata-Alma shares her insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods she uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC Gabriela Zapata-Alma is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a lecturer at the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. She is a 2012 graduate of SSA (now Crown Family School) in the Extended Evening Program. Gabriela brings 15 years of experience working with survivors of domestic violence and other trauma; providing direct services, training, advocacy, and consultation; and leading programs using a trauma-informed approach, Motivational Interviewing, harm reduction, gender-responsive care, Housing First, and third wave behavioral interventions. Gabriela has been recognized with numerous awards, including Health & Medicine Policy Research Group’s 2018 Health Award, and the Illinois Association of Addiction Professionals chapter of NADAAC’s 2017 Rising Star Award. Gabriela has provided training and technical assistance related to serving marginalized communities impacted by trauma and other social determinants of health, locally, nationally, and internationally. Learn more about the work being done through the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health.     You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC has released new episodes of the Checking In Podcast in which we asked PTSD treatment providers to describe the different ways they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques to protect against vicarious trauma. In this episode, Joseph Winford shares his insights on the importance of self-care and the various activities and methods he uses to maintain good health and reduce compassion fatigue.      About Our Guest Joseph Winford, MS, CADC, EMT, QHEIC Joseph Winford is CEO of T.I.T.U.S. Concepts (Training Innovatively Through Unique Strategies),a leadership strategist, and a trauma-informed care provider with more than 25 years of experience working in the greater Chicago area. He holds a master's degree in management and leadership; a bachelor’s in business management and information systems, and he is a certified counselor, coach, consultant, and domestic violence counseling educator. His unique blend of expertise as a behavioral healthcare professional and leadership educator gives him an innovative approach to developing peoples’ potential into performance. Joseph is also the founder of the Couples Community project. Couples Community facilitates skill-based workshops designed to provide an educational and supportive environment for couples seeking change with the aim of enhancing relationships and helping couples grow as they continue along their journey of life together. Connect with and learn more about T.I.T.U.S. Concepts on Facebook!     You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms!   
Published: June 29, 2023
Multimedia
In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, the Great Lakes MHTTC is releasing new episodes of the Checking In Podcast that focus on the different ways PTSD treatment providers embrace self-care and maintain their own mental health, as well as how they "check in" with themselves and recognize when they need to engage in stress relieving techniques. Dr. Michael Gomez shares his insights on self-care, including the importance of agencies taking on the responsibility of providing clinicans with the necessary self-care resources to be well.      About Our Guest Michael Gomez, PhD Dr. Michael Gomez has held multiple positions in the mental health field. He was previously on staff at Bradley Hospital, Lifespan Institute, one of the teaching hospitals for the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University. Dr. Gomez was also previously director of the Adversity and Resilience Community Center (ARCC), a child trauma behavioral health clinic in the West Texas area where he was also an adjunct professor at Texas Tech University Psychological Sciences; the Texas Tech University College of Education; and the TTUHSC School of Nursing. He was previously faculty at the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect/Child Study Center Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at the OU Health and Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He specializes in Trauma-Focused CBT, treatment of adolescents with problematic sexual behaviors (PSB), PCIT, TARGET, and assessment of autism spectrum disorders. He is a Nationally Certified TF-CBT Trainer; of which he is one of 70 in the world.  Additionally, he is a Nationally Certified CE-CERT Trainer, a model for addressing burnout and vicarious trauma in providers, of which he is one of 10 in the US. He is also a nationally certified PCIT therapist. He is trained in assessment and diagnostics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). He is one of the three founders of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s (NCTSN) Trauma and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Workgroup (formerly the NCTSN Trauma and ASD Community of Practice). He was also a member of the NCTSN Steering Committee, the NCTSN Affiliate Program, and the NCTSN Youth Action Committee.      You can find this episode and many more from the Great Lakes Wave podcast channel on YouTube, Anchor, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and all other major podcast platforms! 
Published: June 27, 2023
Print Media
  This report is based on the research and the results of an intensive technical assistance (ITA) series hosted by our valued partners at the Wisconsin Association of Family & Children's Agencies (WAFCA). The report outlines the initial data of a multi-year intensive series being conducted with the participation of several schools in Wisconsin. For more information about the data presented in this report, please email [email protected].      For more information about the Wisconsin Association of Family & Children's Agencies, visit wafca.org.   
Published: June 15, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The June 2023 issue honors National Pride Month, National PTSD Awareness Month, and Men's Health Month by sharing events and resources on these topics. As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: June 5, 2023
Toolkit
Prolonged educational workforce shortages perpetuate professional burnout and stress among educators and school staff. This resource guide provides tools to support the self-care and wellness of educators and staff working in school communities.    In this guide, you will find: National Education Association (NEA) 2022 member survey data Peer-reviewed research on the status of workforce shortages in education after COVID-19 Self-care assessments and strategies for wellness specific to educators, school staff, and school settings Podcasts, videos, and recorded webinars addressing self-care and wellness for educators              
Published: May 23, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The April-May 2023 issue honors National Mental Health Awareness Month, National Children's Mental Health Awareness Week, National Asian American and Pacific Islanders Heritage Month, and National Prevention Week by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features an upcoming in-person conference and an exciting, new intensive technical assistance training series sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.    As always, you will find links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC in The Great Lakes Current.     
Published: May 4, 2023
Multimedia
  RECORDING: Applying the Research: Practical Supports for Suicide Prevention in Schools   DESCRIPTION: Efforts to prevent suicide at the individual and community level are important for reducing suicide among youth. Suicide is complex with no single cause. This webinar addresses three factors for consideration when focusing on suicide prevention. The speakers will share findings and practical takeaways from their AFSP funded research. One important factor related to mental health and wellness among school aged youth is sleep. Dr. Tina Goldstein will share insights and data regarding the relationship between sleep and suicide. Next, Dr. Anna Mueller will review what she has learned from her research about important ingredients for suicide prevention in schools. Finally, Dr. Marisa Marraccini will describe how to facilitate a student’s return to school after hospitalization for suicidal behavior. There are many considerations to help students and schools adapt to support students in this process of transition. The goal of the webinar is to share insights to build an informed and active community working together for suicide prevention.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe How sleep patterns may impact mental health and wellness Provide 3 actions that can be taken to facilitate a student’s return to school after hospitalization for suicidal behavior Enumerate strategies for suicide prevention that can be used in schools     PRESENTERS: Tina Goldstein, PhD, clinical and research interests focus on understanding the etiology and psychosocial treatment for youth with, and at-risk for, mood disorders and suicide. Her research program is supported by grant funding from federal and private foundations, and she is the author of over 150 manuscripts and book chapters. Her contributions to the field have been recognized with numerous awards, including the Klerman Young Investigator Award from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).       Anna S. Mueller, PhD, is the Luther Dana Waterman Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University Bloomington. She received her BA from Wellesley College in 2002 and her PhD in sociology in 2011 from the University of Texas at Austin. Using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, Mueller’s research examines (1) the social roots of adolescent suicide; (2) the experience of suicide bereavement in adolescence, and (3) how organizational science can help improve suicide prevention in schools. Her research on youth suicide has won numerous awards for its contribution to knowledge, including the Edwin Shneidman Early Career Award from the American Association of Suicidology. In 2020, she was named one of Science News’s Top 10 Early Career Scientists to Watch. Her research is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the Western Colorado Community Foundation, among others. She is passionate about helping schools, families, and communities find better ways to prevent youth suicide and to heal after suicide losses.     Marisa Marraccini, PhD, specializes in promoting the mental health and well-being of students and preventing health risk behaviors. Trained as a school psychologist, she became interested in supporting high-risk adolescents to prevent suicide and other health risk behaviors during her internship at a rural high school. Recognizing a critical need to better support these students, she sought out advanced training in suicide assessment research through a postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior in the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Currently, Marraccini is an Implementation Research Fellow through the Implementation Science Research Institute at Washington University of St. Louis.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 27, 2023
Multimedia
  SERIES DESCRIPTION: Universal mental health screening is gaining recognition as an effective way to identify early warning signs of youth mental health needs. However, it can be an overwhelming process! In this 3-part series, participants will learn how to implement school mental health screening, with attention to readiness, follow-up, and sustainability.     PART 1 RECORDING: How Do We Start? Creating a Plan for School Mental Health Screening Handouts:       PART 1 DESCRIPTION: Universal mental health screening is gaining recognition as an effective way to identify early warning signs of youth mental health needs. However, it can be an overwhelming process! In this 3-part series, participants will learn how to implement school mental health screening, with attention to readiness, follow-up, and sustainability. In session 1, best practices to enhance readiness for universal mental health screening in the school setting will be presented. Specifically, webinar attendees will learn best practices for teaming, identifying needs and screening targets, and selecting a screening tool. Materials to support planning and tool selection will be available to attendees.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify teaming and collaboration best practices for mental health screening.  Understand needs assessment and screening target selection. Identify a procedure for selecting a mental health screening tool.       PART 2 RECORDING: How Do We Respond? Legal and Ethical Follow-Up for School Mental Health Screening Handouts:         PART 2 DESCRIPTION: Universal mental health screening is gaining recognition as an effective way to identify early warning signs of youth mental health needs. However, it can be an overwhelming process! In this 3-part series, participants will learn how to implement school mental health screening, with attention to readiness, follow-up, and sustainability. In this second session, participants will learn what to do with school mental health screening results. Specifically, legal and ethical follow up using a tiered system for intervention and referral will be described. Webinar attendees will learn how to organize follow-up assessments, map screening results to existing interventions, and to delve into school- and class-level trends. Materials to support timely follow-up will be available to attendees.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Understand legal and ethical obligations associated with mental health screening in schools Identify follow-up assessment procedures Identify needs assessment procedures for aligning mental health screening with intervention and referral Understand mechanisms for pinpointing and intervening on school- and class-level trends in mental health screening data       PART 3 RECORDING: How Do We Continue? Organization and Sustainability for School Mental Health Screening Handouts:   SBMH Screening Part 3 Handout_Zahn_508_kms.pdf   PART 3 DESCRIPTION: Universal mental health screening is gaining recognition as an effective way to identify early warning signs of youth mental health needs. However, it can be an overwhelming process! In this 3-part series, participants will learn how to implement school mental health screening, with attention to readiness, follow-up, and sustainability. In the third session, participants will learn how to organize data and build lasting systems. Specifically, systems for progress monitoring and tracking of follow-up will be presented. Webinar attendees will learn how to store and re-visit screening data effectively and efficiently to serve youth over the long run. Materials to support data management will be available to attendees.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify progress monitoring systems for mental health screening Understand recommended timelines for ongoing mental health screening Recognize the need for sustainable data organization for long-term screening implementation       PRESENTER: Miranda Zahn, PhD, NCSP, is an Assistant Professor of School Psychology at the University of South Dakota. She conducts research, training, and technical assistance in school-based mental health services. Specifically, Miranda focuses on social justice and the role of teachers in school supports for youth mental health. In addition, Miranda is a school psychologist and school mental health provider at Nebraska’s Educational Service Unit #1, where she provides direct services to youth as well as training and systems consultation to schools.        The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 26, 2023
Toolkit
The Trauma-Informed Teacher Tip Guide is a new resource to help educators more effectively and empathetically respond to students experiencing ongoing stress and trauma. This tip guide provides methods teachers can use to understand signs of dysregulation, decode student behaviors related to trauma, and apply evidence-based tools that help students move to a place of emotional regulation.   Download The Trauma-Informed Teacher Tip Guide to learn more about creating safe and trauma-informed learning environments!   This product was developed by Becky Haas and our partners at the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities (OACBHA).    
Published: April 20, 2023
Multimedia
***RECORDING***  (click the link below) Part 2: Invisible Injuries: The Complex Intersection of Domestic Violence, Behavioral Health, Traumatic Brain Injury and Strangulation   DESCRIPTION: The significant impact of domestic violence on a person’s behavioral health—including substance use and mental health conditions—has long been recognized by researchers and practitioners alike. In addition, the domestic violence movement has known for decades that abusers frequently assault their partners by targeting the head, neck, and face—through blows to the head that can cause traumatic brain injuries (concussions) and strangulation.  We are just discovering how that violence impacts the brain, and therefore a person’s health. Brain injury caused by domestic violence is rarely identified and almost never immediately treated, and results in short- and long-term physical, emotional, and cognitive consequences that can impact every area of a person’s life--including their ability to successfully access and participate in your agency's services. This session will share with you The Ohio Domestic Violence Network and The Ohio State University’s project and research that resulted in the creation of an evidence-based framework CARE (Connect, Acknowledge, Respond, Evaluate) and its accompanying CARE tools for you to use to address brain injury.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the relationship between domestic violence and brain injury. Explain the evidence-based framework: Connect, Acknowledge, Respond and Evaluate (CARE). Promote CARE tools to address brain injury.     PRESENTER: Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 15, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The March 2023 issue honors National Women's History Month by sharing resources from the Mental Health Technology Transfer (MHTTC) Network that focus on an array of behavioral health issues affecting women and girls. This issue also features an exciting, new intensive technical assistance training series sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  As always, The Great Lakes Current provides links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: March 10, 2023
Multimedia
***RECORDING*** (click the link below) Part 1: Invisible Injuries: The Complex Intersection of Domestic Violence, Behavioral Health, Traumatic Brain Injury and Strangulation   DESCRIPTION: The significant impact of domestic violence on a person’s behavioral health—including substance use and mental health conditions—has long been recognized by researchers and practitioners alike. In addition, the domestic violence movement has known for decades that abusers frequently assault their partners by targeting the head, neck, and face—through blows to the head that can cause traumatic brain injuries (concussions) and strangulation.  We are just discovering how that violence impacts the brain, and therefore a person’s health. Brain injury caused by domestic violence is rarely identified and almost never immediately treated, and results in short- and long-term physical, emotional, and cognitive consequences that can impact every area of a person’s life--including their ability to successfully access and participate in your agency's services. This session will share with you The Ohio Domestic Violence Network and The Ohio State University’s project and research that resulted in the creation of an evidence-based framework CARE (Connect, Acknowledge, Respond, Evaluate) and its accompanying CARE tools for you to use to address brain injury.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the relationship between domestic violence and brain injury. Explain the evidence-based framework: Connect, Acknowledge, Respond and Evaluate (CARE). Promote CARE tools to address brain injury.     PRESENTER:   Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.       The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 1, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The February 2023 issue honors National Black History Month by sharing resources and content from the African American Behavioral Health Center of Excellence and SAMHSA that focus on how social determinants of health have affected the health and well-being of African Americans, as well as the importance of providing culturally responsive behavioral health services. This issue also features exciting, new training opportunities sponsored by the Great Lakes PTTC, the ATTC Network's Pearls of Wisdom blog series, and the final article of the Power of Music series by Mark Sanders and Kisha Freed.  As always, The Great Lakes Current provides links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: February 7, 2023
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