Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Interactive Resource
Comprehensive School Mental Health Case Examples Training Packet The Comprehensive School Mental Health Case Examples Training Packet was developed to be utilized with multi-disciplinary school teams, including building, district, and/or community professionals, who are tasked with assessing the academic, mental, and behavioral health needs of students.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
About this Resource: The Community Resiliency Model (CRM)® is a skills-based wellness and prevention program that provides a biological, non-stigmatizing perspective on human reactions to stress and trauma. The primary focus of this stabilization program is to learn to reset the natural balance of the nervous system, using the body itself. CRM skills help people understand their nervous system and learn to track sensations connected to their own wellbeing. This low-intensity intervention teaches easy-to-learn skills to manage difficult emotions which can be brought on by stressful personal or professional situations. In this 1.5 hour on-demand recording, presenters share their knowledge of concepts to understand their own and others' stress responses and the skills to regain emotional balance when buffeted by strong negative emotions.
Published: April 11, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: Georgia has had a reputation for being a standard bearer of peer support for many years, and that reputation has been on display over the past 36 months with the launch of the new national 988 and 988lifeline.org. In this series, '988 in Every State', presenters will do a deep dive into what 988 is—its purpose, history, goals, and mechanics, taking micro and macro views of the system by speaking with front line Certified Peer Specialists answering calls and administrators behind the scenes who helped envision and build out Georgia’s response. Throughout the 988 buildup and rollout, Georgia—who already had connected statewide crisis, resource, and warmline telephone support — provided guidance and insight to other states and national leaders. Join staff from the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network as they share their insight and experience throughout this three-part series.
Published: April 9, 2024
Other, Print Media
These documents provide information about Peer Specialists in crisis settings, including general competencies for Peer Specialists in crisis work, Peer Run Warmlines, Peer Navigation, Crisis Respite programs, Mobile Crisis Units, and Crisis Stabilization Units. Subject Matter Experts were consulted on this project and are referenced within each document in quotes as well as recognized as contributors. The content provided in these documents is not exhaustive. Contributors provided expertise; their contribution does not imply endorsement nor does it imply opposition to the document.
Published: April 1, 2024
Multimedia
The one-hour Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance virtual series provides an opportunity for participants to: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health, and Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.   February's topic was "Native Crisis Response (Part Two) – Escalation and De-escalation and Native Implications."
Published: March 8, 2024
Multimedia
About this Resource: The Community Resiliency Model (CRM)® is a skills-based wellness and prevention program that provides a biological, non-stigmatizing perspective on human reactions to stress and trauma. The primary focus of this stabilization program is to learn to reset the natural balance of the nervous system, using the body itself. CRM skills help people understand their nervous system and learn to track sensations connected to their own wellbeing. This low-intensity intervention teaches easy-to-learn skills to manage difficult emotions which can be brought on by stressful personal or professional situations. In this 1.5 hour on-demand recording, presenters share their knowledge of concepts to understand their own and others' stress responses and the skills to regain emotional balance when buffeted by strong negative emotions.
Published: February 13, 2024
Print Media
On September 14th, 2023, over 60 attendees gathered to explore grief leadership, to create space for providers to process the August 8th wildfires in Lahaina, Hawai'i, and to explore how those devastating fires affected people far beyond Maui. This session was a collaboration of the School Crisis Recovery & Renewal Project (a National Child Traumatic Stress Network Category II site) and the youth and young adult specialty program of the Pacific Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center    In times of crisis, coming together to make meaning of what we are each holding helps us show up for ourselves and for each other professionally. Our time together was designed to gather school crisis leaders, youth and young adult providers, and peer support professionals to explore how the Lahaina fires were experienced across multiple communities and ways to better support impacted children, youth, and young adults.   After rich discussions and collective learning and resourcing, we offer the following summary to steer our grief leadership, now and in the weeks, months, and years to come.   
Published: November 29, 2023
Multimedia
The one-hour Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance virtual series provides an opportunity for participants to: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health, and Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.   October's topic was "Responding and Moving Past Tribal Community Crisis."
Published: November 9, 2023
Multimedia
This is a recording of Workshop 4 in the Back to School Series, entitled, “Trauma Informed Suicide Prevention for Administrators,” on September 13, 2023. In the penultimate workshop session, CARS own Training and Technical Assistance Specialists, and former school site and district administrators, Tina Rocha and Angela Castellanos discussed how to build an understanding of suicide prevention policy, the prevalence and impact of traumatic stress and its relation to suicide, and resources available to schools. This session was designed for system leaders, prevention specialists, educators, administrators, school site leadership, district and state administrative leadership, and anyone interested in growing their knowledge, skills, and approaches to suicide prevention in their practice.
Published: October 13, 2023
Multimedia
The one-hour Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance virtual series provides an opportunity for participants to: Gain skills on strength-based approaches in partnership with Native People to enhance Native behavioral health, and Discuss ways that Native brilliance is demonstrated and supports behavioral health, and Learn about Native brilliance examples to share with behavioral health and other health care staff, as well as with local Tribal Nation citizens The concept of Native psychological brilliance will be celebrated through Native music videos and Native spoken word performances as part of each session of the Reclaiming Native Psychological Brilliance series.   July's topic was "Native Crisis Response: Tribal 988 Successes and Challenges."   Watch a recording of this 7/25/23 session here. 
Published: August 9, 2023
Multimedia
This three-hour webinar deep dives into the core competencies previously drafted and shared during the Competencies for Peer Support Workers in Crisis Services webinar hosted in March 2023. The co-facilitators – including a youth peer with recent experience working in the field in a crisis setting - explore each competency and allow participants to apply the competencies in peer crisis work scenarios. We present detailed information about how each competency is applicable in peer crisis work and then use breakout rooms and case studies to prompt discussion on how to utilize a specific competency.    Participants gain knowledge about the complexities of working as a peer in crisis settings and how to maintain the ethical standards of the peer role; gain a detailed understanding of the 5 Core Competencies and how they were developed by the MHTTC team; develop a practical understanding of how the competencies will show up in their work in crisis settings; and learn about practices and tools that can be used to assist with becoming comfortable and skilled in the competencies.   View a recording of this 7/31/23 session here.  
Published: August 9, 2023
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Dr. Nelson will discuss how to diffuse acute emotional reactions in volatile situations to de-escalate potentially dangerous individuals in clinical settings using principles of rapid rapport building. Offered in collaboration with Dr. Lonnie Nelson, Partnerships for Native Health, WSU. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Slides How to De-escalate Anyone with Dr. Christian Conte Find resources from all Technology Transfer Centers Free e-course: Violence Risk Assessment & Management in Community Mental Health Settings 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health at Washington State University   FACILITATOR Lonnie Nelson, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Associate Professor, Partnerships for Native Health, Eastern band Cherokee (AniKituwah)  Dr. Lonnie Nelson (descendant of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Arizona and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Rehabilitation Psychology at University of Washington's Harborview Medical Center. In 2012, he returned to the field of Native health disparities through the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Career Development Award (K12) at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Nelson joined the Washington State University College of Nursing in 2015. His work aims to address health disparities experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native communities through multiple avenues. His current research interests focus on the elimination of health disparities in urban dwelling and other Native populations through the application of culturally adapted evidence-based interventions and other patient centered approaches to changing health behaviors, such as indigenized motivational interviewing and harm reduction treatments. Outside of work, he enjoys making and using traditional Native archery gear and spending time with his 7-year-old daughter, Amelia.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: June 20, 2023
Multimedia
This is a recording of “Session 1: 988 Turns One! How Did it Go and How Can it Grow?” in the Rising Practices & Policies Revisited: Emerging Priorities in Mental & School Mental Health series.  On May 8, 2023, our Center’s Co-Director Dr. Miranda March hosted this Session 1, a panel discussion on how school and mental health leaders from our Pacific Southwest region have implemented 988, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline that launched in July of 2022. The panel was moderated by Danielle Raghib, Technical Assistance Specialist with the Center for Applied Research Solutions and featured CJ Loiselle, David Lopez, Kelly Marschall and Dr. Margie Balfour.  View this recording to hear the panelists' presentations and a Q&A with participants regarding the following questions, and more: How has the launch of 988 gone and how has it served the communities in our region? What are some of the challenges and wins? What are some of the lessons learned in the implementation of 988 (what worked and didn’t work, any models adopted, any emerging practices emerging)?
Published: May 12, 2023
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE Learn how healthcare clinicians in Idaho are addressing the state's high suicide rate-- the 11th highest suicide rate in the U.S in 2019-- by building resilient individuals and communities.     GUEST  Betsy Hammar, MS  Program Specialist, Suicide Prevention Program Center for Drug Overdose and Suicide Prevention  Division of Public Health Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Betsy came to her work in suicide prevention through a lifelong passion for public service and individual wellness. Her diverse skill set developed first through business management, then non-profit management, allows her to negotiate a broad spectrum of relationships, partnerships, and stakeholder engagement. Her background includes almost ten years at the American Red Cross, supporting volunteers who deliver vital disaster response services, and the supporting services of operational and fund-raising activities. Because Idaho’s Suicide Prevention State Plan approach involves a heavy public-private element, her work at the state’s Department of Health & Welfare entails much more than education. Her business acumen facilitates projects and programs that require voluntary participation of individuals and organizations all across the state and State Plan advisory groups stand up initiatives to reduce suicide through categories like Capacity Building & Infrastructure, Advocacy & Policy, Suicide Care/Zero Suicide. Betsy also sits on the Advisory Committee for PCORI funded research to explore the role of Caring Contacts in the medical setting. HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: April 4, 2023
Multimedia
Peer support workers are increasingly serving in roles within the crisis care continuum. With 988 roll-out, states working in integrate peer support services within crisis care call centers, mobile crisis response teams, and crisis stabilization units. Peer support workers strengthen engagement and improve outcomes for people experiencing a crisis. Peer support workers provide crisis prevention services and post-crisis services like peer navigation and community support, essential for people who recently experienced crisis.   In this 60-minute webinar, participants: Learned about how the New England MHTTC worked with partners to learn more about the competencies used by peer support workers in crisis services Discussed workforce preparation needs in crisis services Described organizational structures that support crisis teams that include peer support workers View a recording of this 3/16/23 session here. 
Published: March 20, 2023
Presentation Slides
View Recording Slides (use the Download link above) Understanding Human Trafficking for Mental Health Professionals  Session 2: Trauma Bonding, Coercive Control, and Vulnerable Populations March 9, 2023 In this session, participants will learn about the relational dynamics involved in human trafficking and the intersection of human trafficking and vulnerable populations.  Facilitator: Dr. Sophia Jones is a Training and Consultation Specialist with Rutgers-Behavioral Health- Behavioral Research and Training Institute for the Children’s System of Care Training & Technical Assistance Program and an adjunct faculty member at Rutgers University. Dr. Jones has over 18 years of experience in the behavioral health field, specializing in culturally competent focused crisis intervention and service plans. She brings years of experience working with children and families diagnosed with mental illness from the New Jersey System of Care. Dr. Jones continues to advocate for health equity and equal access to mental health services. She specializes in healthcare professional and corporate development training programs focused on Working with Families Living in Poverty, Health Disparities, Health and Public Policy, Anti-Racism, Human Trafficking, Cultural Competence, Implicit Bias, Effective Team Building, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging, The Culture of Hip-Hop, Developing Rapport with Children and Families and Safety in the Community. Dr. Jones earned a doctorate from Seton Hall University and is a strong advocate against Human Trafficking.    Session 1: Understanding the Foundation of Human Trafficking
Published: March 14, 2023
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE We speak with Dr. Kira Mauseth about workplace stress and trauma for those working on crisis lines.  She also offers strategies on how to manage the impact of these on your wellbeing.   GUEST  Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who splits her professional time between seeing patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates, teaching as a Senior Instructor at Seattle University and serving as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health. She also serves on the state’s Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC). Her work and research interests focus on resilience and recovery from trauma as well as well as disaster behavioral health. She has worked abroad extensively in disaster response and with first responders and health care workers throughout United States. Dr. Mauseth also conducts trainings and provides presentations to organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities.     HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: January 9, 2023
Multimedia
  RECORDING: Crisis Line Response: Helping People with Personality Disorders (Part 2)   DESCRIPTION:  A universal experience of crisis call centers is burnout among staff because of seemingly endless, often repetitive interactions with callers who are in distress and suicidal but do not respond to the usual suggestions of self-care or follow-up. An hour-long phone call can leave the worker exhausted and the caller in worse shape than at the beginning of the call.    This follow-up 1-hour training will provide additional training in working with people who have personality disorders on a crisis line. This time around we will address some particular issues that were mentioned by participants in the first training. These issues include additional information about histrionic personality disorder, hypothetical examples of calls, suggestions on how to avoid falling into endless conversational loops with callers and finally, good ways to bring a call to a close.    Watch the recording of Crisis Line Response: Helping People with Personality Disorders (Part 1) on the Great Lakes MHTTC website!     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Be introduced in more depth to histrionic personality disorder and other disorders as requested. Learn about the typical conversational style of various personality disorders. Hear examples of different ways to end a conversation that is no longer therapeutic or productive.     PRESENTER:   David Mays, MD, PhD Dr. David Mays is a licensed physician in the state of Wisconsin, where he is a clinical adjunct assistant professor in the University of Wisconsin Department of Psychiatry. He is Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He is also a member of the Wisconsin Psychiatric Association. Dr. Mays has received the Distinguished Service Award from the Alliance on Mental Illness in Dane County, the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the Exceptional Performance Award from the Wisconsin Health and Family Services, the Outstanding Professional Award from the Wisconsin Association on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, and the Outstanding Mental Health Professional Award from the Wisconsin National Alliance on Mental Illness.      The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: January 4, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The January issue of Northwest News includes a holiday message from our team as well as announcements of upcoming SAMHSA and partner events, our latest podcast episodes, free e-courses, and other training opportunities.
Published: January 4, 2023
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This is a recording of the webinar held on December 20, 2022. The webinar discusses efforts in Washington State to support implementation of the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline as well as the first Native and Strong Lifeline in the country. Washington State Representative Tina Orwall describes passing legislation to improve the state’s suicide and behavioral health crisis response system implementing 988, which is strengthening Washington’s behavioral health crisis system. She discusses what is currently in progress as well a continuing vision to strengthen the crisis response system in Washington State, and across the country. Presenters Vicki Lowe (American Indian Health Commission for Washington State), Lucilla Mendoza (WA Health Care Authority) and Rochelle Williams (Volunteers of America Western Washington) describe the recently launched Native and Strong Lifeline which is the Nation's first crisis line dedicated to serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities and is staffed by Native crisis counselors.   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Rep. Tina Orwall's presentation slides Vicki Lowe's presentation slides Rochelle Williams' presentation slides 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline Native and Strong Website Native and Strong Lifeline Flyer Volunteers of America Western Washington Tribal Services Washington State Department of Health 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline Webpage 988 Crisis Jam Learning Community American Indian Health Commission of Washington State Tribal Nations Maps Article: House passes Orwall’s 988 lifeline for suicide prevention and crisis response Article: Nation’s first Native and Strong Lifeline Launches as Part of 988 Article: Washington State’s 988 Legislation Includes a 988 Tribal Crisis Line Video: Embedding Equity into 988 Video: 988 Crisis Jam Learning Community on the Native and Strong Lifeline   Related Resources from the MHTTC Network 988 Special Edition Newsletter from the Northwest MHTTC Document: A Guide to 988: America's Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Crisis Lifeline Recorded Webinar: 988 National Crisis Number - A Tribal Outreach Approach Recorded Webinar: 988 Suicide and Crisis Care Transformation   SPEAKERS Tina Orwall, MSW Washington State Representative, 33rd District Tina has represented the 33rd district since 2009. Tina has worked with all levels of government to help embrace best practices to better serve the community. Her 20 years of experience working in the public mental health system, as well as her expertise in strategic planning in workforce development and affordable housing have established her as a valued legislator and community leader. See her full bio.     Lucilla Mendoza, MSW, CPP Lucilla works with the Washington State Health Care Authority as a Tribal Behavioral Health Administrator in Tribal Affairs, which provides support and communication with tribes and tribal-related organizations for American Indian and Alaska Native health care. Lucilla is involved in a myriad of Tribal activities, meetings and collaborations with organizations like Volunteers of America Western Washington, the Tribal Centric Behavioral Health Advisory Board, the American Indian Health Commission, the Washington State Department of Health, the Tribal 988 Crisis Response Improvement Strategy Subcommittee, the Washington Monthly Tribal Meeting, and the American Indian and Alaska Native Opioid Response Workgroup.   Vicki Lowe Vicki Lowe, Executive Director of the American Indian Health Commission for Washington State (AIHC) since July 2015, is a Jamestown S’Klallam descendant. She has also worked in the Health Department of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe since December of 1996. Through their Purchased and Referred Care (PRC) Program, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe purchased insurance for their Tribal Members without access to any other coverage since 1995. Ms. Lowe has seen this program through many changes in the private insurance world as well as Medicare and Medicaid.  She participated on the Basic Health Sponsorship Workgroup, negotiated a Tribal Member only plan with a commercial carrier, initiated contracting with commercial carriers at the Jamestown Family Health Clinic, participated in the creation and implementation of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Employee Plan, a self-funded plan, worked with Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s newly created Human Resources Department to review and update benefits for the employee’s plans - benefits including Life, AD&D and LTD, Long Term Care Coverage, Self-Funded Worker’s Compensation and Wellness benefits. She also worked on implementation of the Indian provisions of the Affordable Care Act into the Employee Benefits and PRC programs.    Rochelle Williams, MS Rochelle is the Tribal Operations Manager with Volunteers of America Western Washington. She is an enrolled member of the Ehattesaht First Nation and a descendant of the Tulalip Tribes. Rochelle helps run the recently-launched 988 Native and Strong Lifeline as well as the Washington Indian Behavioral Health Hub, a central resource point for those affiliated with the Native American and Alaska Native Communities.     Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 22, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This is a recording of the webinar held on December 13, 2022; the webinar explores the unique issues facing those doing in-person crisis intervention and first responder work. Practical information and tools will are shared to offer support to people in these roles. Providing mobile outreach crisis intervention and evaluation services for people in a behavioral health crisis takes immense skill and is a 24/7 job. The launching of the National 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline heightened the need for staff and leadership who have this complex expertise. Workers respond to complex crisis situations, conduct face-to face assessments and make determination decisions, utilizing standardized and advanced risk and assessment skills. They sometimes triage to divert from emergency services if possible and alternatives exist. Staff develop stabilization and safety plans in collaboration with the person receiving care. Supervisors of staff and teams provide feedback, ensure exceptional clinical services and effective, efficient program operations and consultation. Workers complete documentation and safety planning and possess an in-depth knowledge of community resources including the ability to address tailored needs.    Being a crisis and/or first responder takes a heavy toll. Witnessing crises, suffering and trauma day after day can affect their well-being. These roles continued despite a pandemic that is transitioning to an endemic. Job vacancies, insufficient resources, organizational culture and inadequate training can make a difficult role feel impossible. Professional distance and self-care can suffer when the crises keep happening, meanwhile working in a climate unsupportive of staff wellness and needing everyone to work extra shifts.  This presentation covered topics related to the establishment and maintenance of healthy boundaries between yourself and the work, strategies for engaging active coping skills that don’t feel like more on your “to do list,” and the various stress response systems, including how to recognize and engage effective coping based on how your brain and body are responding to the stress of the work.     Goals:  Develop detailed understanding of the ways that you personally may be impacted by the stressors of in-person response work during the transition from pandemic to endemic management of COVID 19 Understand how to create a plan for yourself in order to effectively manage stressors that you may be facing Begin to establish and maintain clear boundaries for yourself that act to protect you from additional burnout risks Outline participant needs and priorities for future trainings   RESOURCES Presentation slides Locus of Control self-assessment quiz recommended by Dr. Kira Mauseth The Evidence Base for Interventions Targeting Individuals with Work-Related PTSD: A Systematic Review and Recommendations; Volume 42, Issue 2; https://doi.org/10.1177/0145445517725048 Posttraumatic stress disorder in police, firefighters, and emergency dispatchers; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2018.08.005 SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center Supplemental Research Bulletin First Responders: Behavioral Health Concerns, Emergency Response, and Trauma Change Your Mind: Meditation Benefits for the Brain When science meets mindfulness: Researchers study how it seems to change the brain in depressed patients - The Harvard Gazette Mindfulness Improves Emotion Regulation and Executive Control on Bereaved Individuals: An fMRI Study Front. Hum. Neurosci., 28 January 2019, Sec. Cognitive Neuroscience https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2018.00541 National Guidelines for Behavioral Health Crisis Care – A Best Practice Toolkit from SAMHSA Resources from Northwest MHTTC related to this topic: Behavioral Health Crisis Response Systems webinar series Dr. Mauseth’s previous series with the Northwest MHTTC: Disaster Response and Behavioral Health Brief Behavioral Skills: DBT Distress Tolerance Skills  FACILITATOR Kira Mauseth, PhD Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who splits her professional time between seeing patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates, teaching as a Senior Instructor at Seattle University and serving as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the WA State Department of Health. She also serves on the state’s Disaster Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC). Her work and research interests focus on resilience and recovery from trauma as well as well as disaster behavioral health. She has worked abroad extensively in disaster response and with first responders and health care workers throughout United States. Dr. Mauseth also conducts trainings and provides presentations to organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 19, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The December issue of Northwest News provides information on support during the holidays, World AIDS Day, International Day of Persons with Disabilities and National Impaired Driving Prevention Month. We also include information on our upcoming webinar: 988 in Washington State: Sharing the Journey, our most recent podcast on Intersectionality of the Transitioning Veteran, free resources, and other training opportunities.
Published: December 16, 2022
Multimedia
About the Community of Practice:  In a crisis, school mental health leaders help a school community build a collective coping system; navigate overwhelming situations; and stay attuned to how various members are activated by different events, experience shared events differently, and have varying recovery and renewal needs. And, this work can be incredibly overwhelming, lonely, and isolating. It doesn’t have to be though: our greatest source of support comes from creating space to resource ourselves, resource each other, and to then resource the school communities we lead.   Join the Southeast MHTTC for the first session in a three-part coaching series for school leaders. Facilitated by the School Crisis Recovery & Renewal project, we are offering three sessions to engage in self & collective reflection. The series is an extended learning opportunity following Parts 1-6 of the collective trauma webinar series; you do not need to have attended all the webinars to attend the CoP, though it is highly recommended. You can view parts 1-6 here.   What can you expect from these CoP sessions? Application of theory, interactive breakouts, peer coaching, and bringing the frameworks to life (including workshopping how to translate framework language like “healing” into the contexts and communities in which you lead).   Session Overview:  Session 3 focuses on our school mental health crisis renewal leadership skills and approaches. We will provide a dialogue space to explore how to lead from a trauma-organized stance to a “healing-organized” stance. We will also discuss how to partner with faith based organizations, students, and diverse voices in the aftermath of a crisis.   Session Objectives:  Enhance knowledge, skills and capacities related to school crisis recovery & renewal leadership Identify 1-3 practices to begin or continue implementing that strengthen a trauma-informed crisis leadership approach
Published: December 13, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November‒December 2022 issue honors National Impaired Driving Prevention Month (December) by sharing resources and media from SAMHSA's "Talk. They Hear You.®" campaign for underage drinking prevention. This issue also features prevention-focused HealtheKnowledge courses, two new Counselor's Corner blog posts about the relationship between SUD and music, the Great Lakes ATTC's "Embracing Change" article on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog, and even more brand new products and resources from HHS Region 5. 
Published: December 9, 2022
1 2 3 5
Copyright © 2024 Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network
map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down