Products and Resources Catalog

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Print Media
Recent prevalence estimates indicate that 1 in 36 school-age children have autism. Autistic students are much more likely than non-autistic students to experience mental health challenges, including difficulty with flexibility.  This infographic provides information about strategies that can be used by educators to help autistic students navigate situations that differ from their expectations. This infographic includes how to teach these flexibility strategies in a manner that is inclusive and neurodiversity affirming.
Published: August 30, 2023
Multimedia
The South Southwest MHTTC collaborated with the Texas Association of Community Health Centers to host the first Trauma Informed Care Series: Knowledge & Strategies for Health and Hope session on August 8, 2023. This session focused on real-world applications of Trauma Informed Care Principles: Non-Medical Drivers of Health (SDoH) and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)     Trauma Informed Care (TIC) is an evidence-based framework particularly suited to collaboratively identify risk factors to care, such as medication access and use, therapeutic engagement, and non-medical resource needs and navigation.   Watch Recording  
Published: August 22, 2023
Multimedia
Ronitia Hodges and Ashley Stewart discuss the importance and benefits of fostering an authentic and inclusive environment in the workplace. This podcast episode is sponsored by the New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network (MHTTC).  
Published: July 18, 2023
Print Media
Recent prevalence estimates indicate that 1 in 36 school-age children have autism. Autistic students are much more likely than non-autistic students to experience mental health challenges, including difficulty with emotion regulation.  This infographic provides information about strategies educators can use to support autistic students that experience emotion regulation challenges in a manner that is inclusive and neurodiversity affirming.
Published: July 14, 2023
Print Media
  The Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC are dedicated to integrating cultural responsiveness into all our training and technical assistance offerings. We aim to help develop workforce competencies to provide equitable and inclusive care to all. Download this guide to learn more about our growing inventory of evidence-based trainings designed to improve the delivery of culturally-responsive prevention, treatment, and recovery approaches!   If you have questions about the culturally-responsive trainings we currently offer or suggestions for additional culturally-responsive trainings that would support the behavioral health workforces in our region, please contact:  Alfredo Cerrato, Senior Cultural & Workforce Development Officer ([email protected])
Published: July 7, 2023
Print Media
By actively promoting and supporting diverse educators, we can create inclusive learning environments where all students, regardless of their background, feel seen, understood, and represented. School communities are enriched and strengthened when all educators can bring their unique perspectives, experiences, and cultural competencies to the classroom. In addition to encouraging representation and inclusivity, supportingdiverse educators also plays apivotal role in addressing the mental health needs of our students. This is particularly important for students who experience identity-based marginalization, which can lead to depression, anxiety, isolation, and victimization. When diverse teachers are supported, they help break down stereotypes and biases, and foster student empathy and understanding. This cultivates an inclusive and equitable school environment where all students are able to achieve academically and socially.   This product is part of the Mental Health Matters Lead with Equity series. Check out other products in this series:     Supporting LGBTQ Students in Schools   Equitable School Practices to Support Youth Mental Health
Published: June 28, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event African American Women & Mental Health: Strengths, Challenges and Opportunities for Growth, originally held on May 18, 2023.   Presentation Slides
Published: May 30, 2023
Print Media
About this Resource: Given their shared lived experiences, Certified Peer Specialists (CPS) are crucial in offering mutually beneficial support to peers who are recovering from psychiatric and/or substance use disorders. The emotional and interpersonal understanding between a peer and CPS is crucial in the recovery journey. This fact sheet examines the unique role of CPS of color, identifies challenges they may face, and suggests recommendations an organization can implement to support CPS of color. 
Published: May 9, 2023
Multimedia
Learn more about innovative approaches to supporting better outcomes for those who provide care as well as those seeking and receiving behavioral health care in communities of color in New England!   Presenters--including clinicians, researchers, faith and community leaders, and people with lived expertise--will explore strategies for: Delivering culturally competent care Creating recovery-ready workplaces Integrating peer support in the workforce Building career ladders for existing staff and retaining early career staff Day one's theme was "Defining the Workforce and Visioning for the Future" View a recording of this 2/13/23 session here. 
Published: March 2, 2023
Multimedia
Learn more about innovative approaches to supporting better outcomes for those who provide care as well as those seeking and receiving behavioral health care in communities of color in New England!   Presenters--including clinicians, researchers, faith and community leaders, and people with lived expertise--will explore strategies for: Delivering culturally competent care Creating recovery-ready workplaces Integrating peer support in the workforce Building career ladders for existing staff and retaining early career staff Day two's theme was "Building Community and Developing Pathways in Prevention." View a recording of this 2/14/23 session here. 
Published: March 2, 2023
Multimedia
Learn more about innovative approaches to supporting better outcomes for those who provide care as well as those seeking and receiving behavioral health care in communities of color in New England!   Presenters--including clinicians, researchers, faith and community leaders, and people with lived expertise--will explore strategies for: Delivering culturally competent care Creating recovery-ready workplaces Integrating peer support in the workforce Building career ladders for existing staff and retaining early career staff Day four's theme was "Innovations for a Sustainable Workforce" View a recording of this 2/16/23 session here.
Published: March 2, 2023
Multimedia
Our region, the Pacific Southwest MHTTC, is committed to supporting Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) identifying school mental health leaders and their allies with leadership development sessions to facilitate well-being and career support. We also know that the school and mental health professional pipeline struggles with recruiting and retaining representative professionals with diverse identities. As such, we are thrilled to have partnered with Untapped Leaders in this recorded workshop that offers frameworks and tools to school mental health leaders and professionals in Region 9 (and beyond). In this introductory recorded session, presenter Jenny Vasquez-Newsom led participants through the exclusionary history of traditional leadership frameworks. Further, viewers may examine how those outdated definitions persist in organizations today, and how to incorporate contextual understanding and agility to lead organizations (education agencies, departments, school boards, school districts, school sites, school mental health associations) inclusively and effectively from any seat to ensure optimal wellness for ourselves, colleagues, and our staff.
Published: February 6, 2023
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE This session will focus on the divisions in our society that have been illuminated since the killing of George Floyd and the COVID-19 pandemic, and the effects of those divisions on our mental health. The inequitable allocation of resources continues to divide communities. The most important ways to fight against inequality and injustice are for us to show up as collaborators and to share the costs and risks of advocacy. Through this event, we will explore: What it means to be an ally, including the risks How to increase the rate of fair and impartial approaches and treatment Skills to decrease harm to marginalized communities   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation Slides Presentation slides  Articles Cited in Presentation Ijeoma Oluo, "White People Will Always Let You Down" Therapists Are Learning to Treat Racial Trauma Video Shown Matthew Cooke - Race Baiting 101 video (approximately 11 minutes duration) Handouts from Presenter Action Steps Books White Fragility: Why it’s so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism, Robin DiAngelo, 2018​ My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma & the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts & Bodies​, Resmaa Menakem, 2017​ So You Want to Talk About Race​, Ijeuoma Oluo, 2018​ White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, Carol Anderson Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment: A Developmental Strategy to Liberate Us All, Leticia Nieto et. al, 2010​ Colonize This!: Young women of Colour on Today's Feminism Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, Isabel Wilkerson, 2020 The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, Isabel Wilkerson, 2010 Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind, Koa Beck, 2021 Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia, Sabrina Strings, 2019 Podcasts On Being with Krista Tippett, Robin DiAngelo and Resmaa Menakem in Conversation​ On Being with Krista Tippett, Resmaa Menakem, Notice the Rage, Notice the silence​ Videos Referenced PBS: Reconstruction After the Civil War PBS: Mysteries of Mental Illness "White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide" 2018 John F. Morgan Sr. Distinguished Faculty Lecture by Carol Anderson, Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies, Emory University, April 9, 2018 (approximately 52 minutes duration) "We're Not Bad- We're Hurting: Trauma, Hope and Healing" lecture by Dr. Kenneth Hardy (approximately 70 minutes duration) Websites with Resources The MHTTC Network has curated this collection of resources on Racial Equity and Cultural Diversity https://www.samhsa.gov/behavioral-health-equity/black-african-american  https://africanamericanbehavioralhealth.org/  https://www.mhanational.org/issues/black-and-african-american-communities-and-mental-health  https://blackhistorymonth.gov/  1619 Project, Nikole Hannah-Jones, 2021​ Articles of Interest and Information How Black people can cope with the trauma of witnessing repeated death and violence against them Project Implicit, Harvard University White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack by Peggy McIntosh 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge 106 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice White people say they want to be an ally to Black people. But are they ready for sacrifice? No more white saviours, thanks: how to be a true anti-racist ally Black History Month Take The ACE Quiz — And Learn What It Does And Doesn't Mean  Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Advocacy Organizations https://naacp.org/  https://civilrights.org/edfund/    FACILITATOR Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: February 3, 2023
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE We welcome back Sherronda Jamerson to discuss the challenging and emotional question, what does it mean to be an ally?     GUEST Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.       HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: February 3, 2023
Presentation Slides
Breaking Down Barriers to Care: Know the Facts The deaf and hard of hearing community is a cultural and linguistic minority with variations in the type and severity of hearing loss (Pertz). Researchers estimate that 35 million people in the United States identify as having some degree of hearing trouble, ranging from having a little trouble hearing to profound deafness (Galludet). Of the 35 million, an estimated 300,000-500,000 use American Sign Language (ASL) (Mitchell). Despite the large need for interpretation services, the United States only has about 16,000 ASL interpreters (Nimdzi). Learn more about our efforts to amplify the work of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the New England region supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery for those who are deaf/hard of hearing. Celebrate innovation! In a "Round-Robin-style" of presentation, CBOs and local nonprofits in New England showcase their goals, growth, outcomes, and visions for the future in their efforts to support the behavioral health needs of underserved populations. Featured Organizations Greater Nashua Mental Health Mental Health Connecticut Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing   Watch the recording of this 1/25/23 event.
Published: February 1, 2023
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE Please join us for an informative and interactive discussion as we hear about efforts in Washington State to support implementing the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline as well as the first Native and Strong Lifeline in the country.    GUESTS Tina Orwall, MSW Washington State Representative, 33rd District Tina has represented the 33rd district since 2009. Tina has worked with all levels of government to help embrace best practices to better serve the community. Her 20 years of experience working in the public mental health system, as well as her expertise in strategic planning in workforce development and affordable housing have established her as a valued legislator and community leader. See her full bio.     Lucilla Mendoza, MSW, CPP Lucilla works with the Washington State Health Care Authority as a Tribal Behavioral Health Administrator in Tribal Affairs, which provides support and communication with tribes and tribal-related organizations for American Indian and Alaska Native health care. Lucilla is involved in a myriad of Tribal activities, meetings and collaborations with organizations like Volunteers of America Western Washington, the Tribal Centric Behavioral Health Advisory Board, the American Indian Health Commission, the Washington State Department of Health, the Tribal 988 Crisis Response Improvement Strategy Subcommittee, the Washington Monthly Tribal Meeting, and the American Indian and Alaska Native Opioid Response Workgroup.   Rochelle Williams, MS Rochelle is the Tribal Operations Manager with Volunteers of America Western Washington. She is an enrolled member of the Ehattesaht First Nation and a descendant of the Tulalip Tribes. Rochelle helps run the recently-launched 988 Native and Strong Lifeline as well as the Washington Indian Behavioral Health Hub, a central resource point for those affiliated with the Native American and Alaska Native Communities.   HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 29, 2022
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE Join us as we discuss with Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP, how to navigate unconscious racism and create a safe environment where clients of color can be seen fully, as they are, without pretense.   GUEST Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.       HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 20, 2022
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE Join us as we discuss how race impacts therapeutic relationships and how providers can show up for their clients of color.   GUEST Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.       HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Webinar recording and related resources PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 20, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Over the last few years, racial divisions have been explored more openly in the American mainstream. However, in most therapeutic relationships, clients of color are likely to not open up if their provider is of a different race. In a time when racial turmoil hits the news daily, worries about safety, belonging, inclusion, etc. are commonplace for both individuals as well as communities of color. When those worries are not expressed in therapeutic encounters, they become the elephant in the room. Learning to listen for the clues and skillfully bringing up race are opportunities to connect meaningfully with your clients of color and provide them with the high quality of care they deserve.   Learning Objectives: Increase the success rate of fair and impartial treatment Become better providers Decrease harm to marginalized communities   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides  21-Day Racial Equity Challenge Handout Crossroads to Reinforcing Cycles in Relationships Handout Poem: "PLEASE HEAR WHAT I’M NOT SAYING" by Cardinal Deardon   FACILITATOR Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 19, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Unconscious or unspoken racism compromises clinical discussions and outcomes. Learning to listen for the clues and skillfully bring up race as opportunities to connect meaningfully with your clients of color and provide them with the high quality of care they deserve. Create a safe environment where clients can be seen fully, as they are, without pretense. People of color, traditionally, don't feel welcomed and tend to avoid mainstream clinical resources and consequently are unable to access much needed sometimes critical resources. As a non-topic in therapy, it inhibits and deters authentic communication and inhibits therapeutic connections.   Learning Objectives: How unconscious or unspoken racism compromises clinical discussions and outcomes Create a safe environment where clients can be seen fully, as they are, without pretense Become aware of one's own biases   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge Handout Crossroads to Reinforcing Cycles in Relationships Handout Poem: "PLEASE HEAR WHAT I’M NOT SAYING" by Cardinal Deardon   FACILITATOR Sherronda Jamerson, MA, CDP Sherronda Jamerson obtained a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from City University College in Seattle, WA, and became certified as a Chemical Dependency Professional in 2007. Her experiences include developing, implementing, and presenting EDI trainings to associations of healthcare professionals, healthcare providers, schools, and community-based organizations. She has also presented at state and national behavioral health conferences on the topics of DEI and Healthcare Equity. She presents with confidence and passion.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: December 19, 2022
Multimedia
This is a recording of the kickoff session for Creating Safe Spaces for Peer Support Providers and Incorporating Anti-racist Practices in Peer Support Delivery that took place on December 7, 2022. Session 1 featured a special guest, Javan Jones, of Jones Community Solutions and was facilitated by Evelyn Clark, CPC. They facilitated a group discussion on a variety of topics, including how to create safe spaces, the foundation of racism in our medical system, why mental advocacy should uplift BIPOC voices of lived experience, and more.  This series is recommended for peer support agencies and peer specialists who identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color who work in mental health and cross-systems and allies to help support the BIPOC peer workforce.
Published: December 16, 2022
Multimedia
In this discussion, a refugee community leader and pediatric health service researcher shared challenges and opportunities to support mental health needs of refugee and immigrant families. They highlighted promising opportunities for partnership and support for immigrant and refugee children and families through direct connection and communication with community partners and families. Watch the event recording from November 16, 2022.
Published: December 13, 2022
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Cultural competence is helpful when working with any community. We invite you to join our presenter, Ahmad Bennett, MA, LMFTA, MHP, a Navy Veteran and Marriage & Family Therapist in learning about the intersectionality, expectations, and experiences of the Veteran Community. Please join us in learning about this community and how we can show up. We will address:  Mental health    Transition expectations & challenges   Veteran culture   Intersectionality of veterans  ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Presentation slides Crossroads Family Therapy Website CDC Article: "Reducing Military and Veteran Suicide" Permission to Start Dreaming Foundation US Dept of Veterans Affairs Veterans Crisis Line Warrior PATHH   Related Resources from the MHTTC Network Behavioral Health Resources for Military Veterans Webinar Series: Healing the Returning Warrior: Keys to Understanding Unique Challenges and Strengths of American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans Module 1: Historical Overview of Natives in Warfare, Military Module 2: Trauma, Historical Trauma, and PTSD Modules 3 & 4: Assessment and Treatment; Traditional Beliefs and Healing Practices FACILITATOR   Ahmad Bennet, MA, LMFTA, MHP Ahmad Bennett is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Associate and certified Mental Health Professional for Washington State. Ahmad completed his internship with Valley Cities Behavioral Health. After graduation he began working with Seattle Counseling Services until their closure, he then entered private practice and founded Crossroads Family Therapy PLLC. in 2022. He graduated from Antioch University Seattle with his Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy. He focuses on providing individual, couple, and family therapy for communities of color, first responders, and veterans. Ahmad is also an adjunct instructor at Antioch University Seattle and teaches a Sexuality & Healthy Relationships course. Ahmad is a medically retired Navy veteran and has worked in veteran-focused social services for over a decade, including working at Lake Washington Institute of Technology for five years as their Veteran Coordinator. Ahmad specialized in housing insecurity, employment services, and veteran transition services.   Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: November 8, 2022
Multimedia
  ABOUT THIS EPISODE In this episode, we talk with Dr. Akansha Vaswani-Bye and Sarah Fikre about their experiences, career paths thus far and what inspires and motivates them to keep pushing for a more equitable landscape in the mental health field. They also discuss how the Social Justice and Inclusion track in the Mental Health Institute will help providers understand that by taking a Social Justice and Inclusion approach to mental health care, we can challenge disparities and inequities in order to provide the most effective and culturally appropriate care for our patients. Listen to learn about the available sessions in the Social Justice and Inclusion Track, how Akansha and Sarah became involved in this work, and what their hopes are for the Mental Health Institute. GUESTS Akansha Vaswani-Bye, PhD Akansha Vaswani Bye, PhD, is an Acting Assistant Professor in the SPIRIT Lab (stands for Supporting Psychosis Innovation through Research, Implementation and Training) at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She grew up in Mumbai and her first learnings as a professional came from individuals and families navigating developmental disabilities. Early in her career, she was introduced to the principles of family-centered care, early intervention, and community-based advocacy. Her interest in narrative practices and systemic change has been at the forefront as she moved into spaces as a researcher, clinician, consultant, and trainer. Her doctoral work focused on drivers of institutional corruption in psychiatry and solutions for reform, particularly the practice of deprescribing and rational prescribing grounded in informed consent. Her current research and implementation work is focused on supporting communities impacted by psychosis, building the family peer workforce, and developing and disseminating culturally responsive principles and practices. She is particularly interested in non-pathologizing interventions and interventions that account for the impact of structural and social determinants of health. Currently, her clinical work is located at the Madison Clinic, a primary care clinic for people living with HIV/AIDS.    Sarah Fikre Sarah is a Research Study Coordinator in the SPIRIT Lab, primarily working with Dr. Vaswani-Bye in supporting the newly launched Mental Health Institute. Before joining the SPIRIT Lab, she worked as a Research Assistant at the Icahn School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, supporting an ongoing NIH-funded research study investigating the effects of supermarket discounts on shopping, food intake, body weight, and health status. She received her BA in Psychology at Columbia University in 2022 and plans to apply to medical school with the hopes of becoming a Psychiatrist and improving mental health outcomes of underserved communities.   HOST Christina N. Clayton, LICSW, SUDP, Northwest MHTTC Co-Director Christina Clayton has been working in the behavioral health field since 1993 working with people and programs addressing severe mental health issues, substance use, co-occurring issues, chronic homelessness, integrated care, outreach, physical health, trauma and diversity/equity/inclusion topics. Christina has education and licenses/credentials in clinical social work, mental health and substance use.  She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor and Field Instructor for the University of Washington School of Social Work (MSW ’97).  Learn more about MHTTC Staff & Faculty   LEARN MORE Mental Health Institute for Washington State Providers PODCAST SERIES Discover other episodes in the Putting It Together series here. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: October 25, 2022
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