Products and Resources Catalog

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Interactive Resource
Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated annually from September 15 to October 15 in the United States to recognize the contributions and influence of Hispanic Americans in the United States. While Hispanics have made and continue to make significant contributions to society, health inequities persist. This year, join the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities (OACBHA) and the Great Lakes MHTTC in our learning challenge as we seek to gain a better understanding of the Hispanic heritage, culture, barriers to behavioral health care, and how to address the systemic inequities faced by this growing population.   Connect with us on Facebook and share your most impactful and motivating takeaways from participating in the challenge!   This educational resource was created by OACBHA in partnership with the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: September 14, 2022
Multimedia
July 28, 2022 During Minority Mental Health Month, join our efforts to amplify the work of community-based organizations (CBOs) in Connecticut and New Hampshire supporting mental health and advancing substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery! In a "Round-Robin-style" of presentation, CBOs and local nonprofits in Connecticut and New Hampshire will showcase their goals, growth, outcomes, and visions for the future in their efforts to support the behavioral health needs of underserved populations.   Presenter(s): Taylor Bryan Turner, Assistant Regional Administrator, SAMHSA Region 1 Maria Restrepo-Toro, Co-Director, New England MHTTC Susan Stearns, Executive Director, NAMI NH Liz Taylor, Executive Director, NAMI CT  
Published: July 28, 2022
Print Media
Stress is a common factor in our society that affects and impacts us daily. On many occasions, this is the cause of various physical and mental health conditions, which creates difficulty in our daily lives. For marginalized communities, the stress factor increases. For decades, the LGBT+1 community has been a population marginalized and stigmatized by the State. Adding to this issue, being part of an ethnic minority increases the stress factor. The Minority Stress Model describes the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed due to their social position, which is often that of a minority. Rodríguez-Seijas and colleagues (2019) estimate that about 25% of people in the Latinx sexual identity/orientation minority sector in the past year have met the criteria for a diagnosis of major depression and 37% a diagnosis of alcohol use. Compared to heterosexual Latinxs, you see a difference between 11% and 13%, respectively. This is a worrying figure because it reflects the social disparities the community goes through.    
Published: July 19, 2022
Multimedia
July 6, 2022 Better Together: A Proactive Journey Toward Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion The New England Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (New England MHTTC) is committed to ensuring equitable outcomes for all. In 2020, amid ongoing racial injustice and grave civic and political unrest, the New England MHTTC launched a strategic process to guide the organization's intentional efforts to expand its racial equity lens—in terms of its policies, structure, activities, and engagements with racially diverse audiences. Learn more about the organization's "Better Together" journey and the internal and external tactics they employed to better serve and engage communities of color, in a consistent and practical way, from members of the New England MHTTC Team.   To view the slide deck that pairs with this presentation, click here. 
Published: July 6, 2022
Presentation Slides
Presentation Slides Presentation Recording Presentation Summary This presentation occurred during the 2022 South Southwest MHTTC First Episode Psychosis conference on June 3rd. Mx. Yaffa was the keynote presenter for this session. Presentation Summary: Although the current Mental Health system is starting to integrate understandings of equity and justice into healing practices and treatment it is important to understand the oppressive history of our system and how this has led to harm within various communities. In this session, Mx. Yaffa discussed the social, historical, and cultural factors impacting care for individuals experiencing psychosis through an intersectional lens. They shared their experiences with living with various mental health challenges and seeing, hearing, and believing things that others do not. Mx. Yaffa shared their experiences with navigating mental health care in three countries, and the cultural Intersections that create various challenges for individuals experiencing first psychosis episodes. Mx. Yaffa shares how their other intersectional identities have both made navigating the mental health system more complex and has helped on their road for recovery. In particular, Mx. Yaffa highlighted trans, Muslim, and indigenous identities as inseparable constants in their care and wellbeing. About the Speaker   Mx. Yaffa (they/them/theirs) Equity and Transformation Consultant   Mx. Yaffa is an award-winning disabled, mad, trans, queer, Muslim, indigenous Palestinian. Mx. Yaffa conducts transformative work around displacement, decolonization, equity, and centering lived experiences of individuals most impacted by injustice. Mx. Yaffa is a storyteller and an equity and transformation consultant, having shared their story with over 100,000 audience members at speaking events globally. Mx. Yaffa has worked in over two dozen countries, and specializes in global and community vision building. Mx. Yaffa is an engineer, with a specialty in sustainability and social engineering, a peer support specialist, and an equity and transformation consultant. Mx. Yaffa utilizes peer support as a foundation for all their work, supporting peer-run spaces in organizational capacity building, equity, and sustainment. Mx. Yaffa brings together engineering, peer support, and trauma to support their vision of more equitable and accountable communities that lead to individuals' self-actualization. Mx. Yaffa is the Founder of several non-profits and community projects, such as CT Mutual Aid, and Life in My Days, an international non-profit that supports individuals and their communities on their journeys for self-actualization through mutual aid, transformative justice, and disability justice. For the last few years, Mx. Yaffa has also been a Master Recovery Educator, facilitating the RI Peer Support Certification training nationally to certify individuals as Peer Support Specialists. Additionally, Mx. Yaffa is an Equity Coach with Sustainable CT, supporting municipalities in the State in engraining equity practices into any sustainability work. Mx. Yaffa has a MA in Conflict Transformation and Social Justice from Queen's University Belfast, a Childhood Traumatic Stress graduate certificate from the Boston Trauma Center, and a Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from WPI. Mx. Yaffa currently serves as a board member for TransLifeline and is the previous co-chair of the International Association of Peer Supporters board.
Published: June 27, 2022
Print Media
About this Resource: As the future of crisis care in the United States is on the cusp of being transformed, it is important to keep under-served and marginalized populations in mind when championing the changes and improvements to those services. This brief guide serves to highlight the unique struggles and barriers that many different marginalized communities experience when trying to access crisis services, and provides a glimpse into the future of crisis care.
Published: June 16, 2022
Print Media
In the U.S., approximately 2% of youth have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Mental health challenges are much more common among autistic youth. This infographic explores the relationship between autism and mental health risk in school-age youth.    In our products, we choose to use identity first language (i.e., autistic students) in response to the preference of many autistic individuals and in an effort to avoid ableist ideologies. We recognize that this is not the language preference of every individual. For more information on the rationale for our language choice, please see the Bottema-Beutel et al., 2021.  
Published: May 19, 2022
Multimedia
This event was held on May 12th, 2022 from 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. MT.  Event Description To view the slide deck from this training, click DOWNLOAD above CLICK HERE to watch the recording Almost all people working in education would say they do what they do in order to support all students, and that they would never target disenfranchised students. However, the persistent educational disparities for students of color, students of low socio-economic backgrounds, and other students with unique needs have been a persistent source of distress for schools and districts across the nation. The practice of mindfulness may be a bridge to help educators better understand how they think, assume, and act based on implicit biases and systemic oppression. Mindfulness is a state of awareness upon the present moment in a particular way and without judgment (Kabat-Zinn, 1994). An extensive body of evidence suggests that mindfulness promotes greater self-awareness and empathy (Chambers, Lo & Allen, 2008; Kabat‐Zinn, 2003; Siegel, 2007), which may be an access point to addressing the dissonance that exists among many educators in bridging their theoretical understanding and ideals of culturally responsive pedagogy (Ladson-Billings, 1995) with their praxis. This highly interactive workshop is designed for anyone working in the education field, and will cover the conceptual foundation as well as turnkey strategies for participants to unpack the layers in which we are affected by bias and the outcomes of systemic oppression, and how these factors can cause us to unintentionally act in ways that contradict our values of equity, inclusion, and belonging. Objectives Build a foundational understanding of the ideological, interpersonal, and institutional facets of systemic oppression in education, and the negative outcomes churned out for historically marginalized and underserved communities Empower participants through an examination of mindfulness as a highly effective tool in cultivating self-awareness and implementing culturally responsive practices that address patterns of inequity in education. Provide participants with turnkey strategies they can implement beyond the session Provide participants with resources to share their learning with their teams, schools, and communities Trainer Dr. Rana Razzaque, Ed.D.                     Dr. Rana Razzaque's mission is to ensure that youth and educators have an intentional focus on honoring diverse cultures and identities, utilizing challenges as opportunities to build resilience, and holistically supporting themselves and others to equitably reach their highest potential. Rana received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Literature from the University of Texas at Austin and Arizona State University, respectively, and focused her thesis research on the impact of literary influence on colonizing South Asia in the 17th century. In 2017, she earned her Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Denver while working for Denver Public Schools' Office of Social Emotional Learning. Her dissertation explored how mindfulness influences the culturally responsive practices of educators. After finishing her doctorate, Rana became the Program Development Coordinator with Sources of Strength and enjoyed supporting youth-led school climate initiatives focused on holistic resilience and belonging and grounds her current work as an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist at Jeffco Public Schools in the intersection of wellness, equity, and transformative leadership.
Published: May 11, 2022
Multimedia
/*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*--> April 28, 2022 Creating a culture of change requires transformative leadership. Our panel of experts will discuss the traits of transformational leaders and share strategies to help leaders create and communicate an organization’s vision, and then to inspire, motivate, and empower others to achieve that vision.   to watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/z4NW6msF4qs   Presenters:  Ashley Stewart, PhD, MSSW, C4 Trainer & Curriculum Development Specialist, C4 Innovations Livia Davis, MSW, Chief Learning Officer, C4 Innovations
Published: April 28, 2022
Multimedia
This presentation occurred on April 7, 2022 and was facilitated by Dr. Roberto Lewis-Fernandez and Dr. Neil Krishan Aggarwal. This webinar describes the role of culture in the experience of and presentation of mental health problems by individuals seeking care and in assessments and treatments offered by providers. The value of a person-centered cultural assessment was presented, focusing on cultural concepts of distress, social determinants of mental health, and treatment planning and engagement. The Cultural Formulation Interview was introduced as a standardized method for person-centered assessment that appears in DSM-5. The Presentation Slide Deck Click Here The Cultural Formulation Interview Project Website Click Here The Core CFI Handout Click Here The CFI Informant Version Handout Click Here The CFI Supplementary Modules Handout Click Here The CFI Module Version Online Click Here
Published: April 18, 2022
Multimedia
This presentation occurred on April 14, 2022 and was facilitated by Dr. Neil Krishan Aggrawal and Dr. Roberto Lewis-Fernandez. The webinar described the process that the DSM-5 Cross-Cultural Issues Subgroup followed to develop the core Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI). It summarized research evidence since the publication of the DSM-5 in 2013. It also offered recommendations for clinicians to implement the CFI with adults in their practice settings. View the links for the resources below: Presentation Slide Deck  The Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) Project Core CFI CFI Informant Version CFI Supplementary Modules CFI Online Training Module
Published: April 18, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2022 issue features Mental Health Awareness month, the Counselor's Corner blog series, and a complete calendar of events. 
Published: April 1, 2022
Print Media
This publication is designed to help organizations and staff address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. It includes an array of resources that provide guidance about raising awareness, assessing competencies, implementing strategic planning, and advanced training opportunities.
Published: November 10, 2021
Multimedia
Supporting the Mental Health of Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  Part 2 of this two-part series provides an overview of evidence-based approaches and practices that can be used within schools to support the mental health of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). It also describes challenges and solutions when implementing these practices in schools.  View the presentation here Learning Objectives By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:  Describe evidence-based approaches to support the mental health of students with IDDs.  Weigh different ways that mental health programing can be delivered to students with IDDs at school.  Plan for successful and sustainable mental health programing for students with IDDs.  Know where to find additional resources to address mental health challenges in students with IDDs.    About the Speaker Katherine Pickard, Ph.D., received her doctorate in clinical psychology from Michigan State University and completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at JFK Partners at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Her primary research interest is in the translation of evidence-based practices into community systems that are naturally positioned to serve children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and developmental delays. Dr. Pickard's research is grounded in community-engaged research models and guided by dissemination and implementation science. Dr. Pickard leads and collaborates on research examining mechanisms that foster the adoption, implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices within a variety of community systems, including early intervention and public school systems. She is particularly interested in the role of families and community stakeholders in shaping interventions as they are implemented within the community, and in other factors that impact the reach and sustainability of translation efforts. Clinically, Dr. Pickard is a licensed psychologist and has a strong background in supporting individuals with ASD and other developmental disabilities across the lifespan. She holds specific expertise in parent-mediated interventions rooted in naturalistic, developmental and behavioral principles (know as NDBIs) as well as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with ASD and co-occuring anxiety. 
Published: September 15, 2021
Multimedia
 Supporting the Mental Health of Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  Part 1 of this two-part series defines intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) and describes signs of mental health challenges in students with IDDs.  Download the presentation slides here Learning Objectives By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:  Identify students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). Identify mental health challenges in students with IDDs at school. Describe risk factors for students with IDDs to develop mental health conditions.       About the Speaker  Katherine Pickard, Ph.D., received her doctorate in clinical psychology from Michigan State University and completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at JFK Partners at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Her primary research interest is in the translation of evidence-based practices into community systems that are naturally positioned to serve children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and developmental delays. Dr. Pickard's research is grounded in community-engaged research models and guided by dissemination and implementation science. Dr. Pickard leads and collaborates on research examining mechanisms that foster the adoption, implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices within a variety of community systems, including early intervention and public school systems. She is particularly interested in the role of families and community stakeholders in shaping interventions as they are implemented within the community, and in other factors that impact the reach and sustainability of translation efforts. Clinically, Dr. Pickard is a licensed psychologist and has a strong background in supporting individuals with ASD and other developmental disabilities across the lifespan. She holds specific expertise in parent-mediated interventions rooted in naturalistic, developmental and behavioral principles (know as NDBIs) as well as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with ASD and co-occuring anxiety. 
Published: September 8, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE For the final podcast in her eight-part series, Aleks Martin reviews each of the topics from her previous webinars, from the midst of the pandemic and to where we are now. This podcast accompanies a recorded webinar on the same topic; view the link below to access additional resources and handouts from the related webinars. The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with Aleks Martin, MSW, LSWAIC, SUDP, to deliver a webinar and podcast series as part of our support for provider well-being. Find out more about the series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES View the webinar recording and access accompanying resources FACILITATOR Aleks Martin (S/he pronouns, but they is ok) has been in the health and social service field for over 20 years. Aleks was drawn to the LGBTQI2+ community in their mid-twenties working for a national HIV-prevention study with youth called, Young Asian Men’s Study (YAMS). This exposed them to the great work of HIV workers from other organizations and how community-based programs are critical in reaching out to the most vulnerable populations. During this time, they worked as a Disease Intervention Specialist with Public Health - Seattle & King County for 7 years, including working on the pilot study for the Rapid HIV Test Kit (then a 20-minute test). A big portion of their professional career was spent at Seattle Counseling Service, a behavioral health agency for the LGBTQ community. From 2003 to 2019, Aleks started as Database Manager, Health Educator, Program Coordinator to Chemical Dependency Counselor and Addictions Program Supervisor. This was the safe space where their yearning for higher education was cultivated so they could serve their community further. As a graduate of the University of Washington’s School of Social Work - Masters Program, Aleks developed their skills as a mental health clinician and social justice advocate. Aleks’ perspectives where shifted and allowed them to have a wider lens for diversity, inclusion and equity. Aleks was inspired to start a private practice to address the special needs of the LGBTQI2+ and BBIPOC (Black, Brown, Indigenous and People of Color), particularly Queer and Trans Asian and Pacific Islander people dealing with unique and special issues that intersect with race/culture and gender/sexuality like coming out, spiritual conflicts, cultural dissonance, gender transition, social navigation at work and other environments, interpersonal relationships from intimacy to friendships, understanding relationships with non-LGBTQI2+ partner(s), and so on. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: August 13, 2021
Print Media
>>> Click on the blue 'View Resource' button to access <<< The Northwest MHTTC School Mental Health Supplement is honored to provide this series for our Region 10 (AK, ID, OR, WA) BIPOC School Mental Health Providers. We have centered the needs, voices, and lived experiences of BIPOC School Mental Health providers through these conversations and materials. We welcome non-BIPOC providers to lean in, listen, and learn how to support our BIPOC colleagues. This video is the second interactive workbook in the series. A flipbook version of the interactive workbook for this session can be found HERE. Additional Anchored in Our Roots materials can be found HERE.  Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our  newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: August 12, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE For the final installment, Aleks Martin reviews each of the topics from her previous webinars, from the midst of the pandemic and to where we are now. Participants from previous webinars will have an opportunity to check-in on what worked or didn't work for them, and how these skill sets help them in ensuring "provider well-being" moves forward into the future. The Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with Aleks Martin, MSW, LSWAIC, SUDP, to deliver a webinar and podcast series as part of our support for provider well-being. Find out more about the series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Our facilitators always make reference to great resources during sessions.  Find their lists below.  Presentation Slides Prior Session Recordings: Session 1: Self-Care Support for Providers Session 2: Mindfulness Practice for Providers Session 3: Mental Wellness vs. Mental Illness Session 4: Impostor Syndrome: Am I Good Enough? Session 5: Stigma, Shame, and Self Session 6: Diversity & Difference Session 7: Fostering Resilience, Avoiding Burnout FACILITATOR Aleks Martin, MSW, LSWAIC, SUDP Aleks Martin (S/he pronouns, but they is ok) has been in the health and social service field for over 20 years. Aleks was drawn to the LGBTQI2+ community in their mid-twenties working for a national HIV-prevention study with youth called, Young Asian Men’s Study (YAMS). This exposed them to the great work of HIV workers from other organizations and how community-based programs are critical in reaching out to the most vulnerable populations. During this time, they worked as a Disease Intervention Specialist with Public Health - Seattle & King County for 7 years, including working on the pilot study for the Rapid HIV Test Kit (then a 20-minute test). A big portion of their professional career was spent at Seattle Counseling Service, a behavioral health agency for the LGBTQ community. From 2003 to 2019, Aleks started as Database Manager, Health Educator, Program Coordinator to Chemical Dependency Counselor and Addictions Program Supervisor. This was the safe space where their yearning for higher education was cultivated so they could serve their community further. As a graduate of the University of Washington’s School of Social Work - Masters Program, Aleks developed their skills as a mental health clinician and social justice advocate. Aleks’ perspectives where shifted and allowed them to have a wider lens for diversity, inclusion and equity. Aleks was inspired to start a private practice to address the special needs of the LGBTQI2+ and BBIPOC (Black, Brown, Indigenous and People of Color), particularly Queer and Trans Asian and Pacific Islander people dealing with unique and special issues that intersect with race/culture and gender/sexuality like coming out, spiritual conflicts, cultural dissonance, gender transition, social navigation at work and other environments, interpersonal relationships from intimacy to friendships, understanding relationships with non-LGBTQI2+ partner(s), and so on. Contact Aleks Martin 206-886-2627 [email protected] www.aleksmartinclinicalservices.com Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: August 11, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE Aleks Martin returns for the seventh event in her Provider Well-Being series to explore the goals of fostering resilience and avoiding burnout. Find out more about the Provider Well-Being series here. Attendees will be able to distinguish between resilience factors and burnout symptoms; identify healthy, ongoing practices in the profession for sustainability; and validate the positive impact of boundary setting. Guest speaker: Ray Gottesman. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Our facilitators always make reference to great resources during sessions.  Find their lists below.  Presentation slides | View them here Guest Speaker: Ray Gottesman, LSWIC | www.raygottesman.com FACILITATOR Aleks Martin, MSW, LSWAIC, SUDP Aleks Martin (S/he pronouns, but they is ok) has been in the health and social service field for over 20 years. Aleks was drawn to the LGBTQI2+ community in their mid-twenties working for a national HIV-prevention study with youth called, Young Asian Men’s Study (YAMS). This exposed them to the great work of HIV workers from other organizations and how community-based programs are critical in reaching out to the most vulnerable populations. During this time, they worked as a Disease Intervention Specialist with Public Health - Seattle & King County for 7 years, including working on the pilot study for the Rapid HIV Test Kit (then a 20-minute test). A big portion of their professional career was spent at Seattle Counseling Service, a behavioral health agency for the LGBTQ community. From 2003 to 2019, Aleks started as Database Manager, Health Educator, Program Coordinator to Chemical Dependency Counselor and Addictions Program Supervisor. This was the safe space where their yearning for higher education was cultivated so they could serve their community further. As a graduate of the University of Washington’s School of Social Work - Masters Program, Aleks developed their skills as a mental health clinician and social justice advocate. Aleks’ perspectives where shifted and allowed them to have a wider lens for diversity, inclusion and equity. Aleks was inspired to start a private practice to address the special needs of the LGBTQI2+ and BBIPOC (Black, Brown, Indigenous and People of Color), particularly Queer and Trans Asian and Pacific Islander people dealing with unique and special issues that intersect with race/culture and gender/sexuality like coming out, spiritual conflicts, cultural dissonance, gender transition, social navigation at work and other environments, interpersonal relationships from intimacy to friendships, understanding relationships with non-LGBTQI2+ partner(s), and so on. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: July 19, 2021
Multimedia
In this presentation, Mid-America MHTTC provides a rationale to address Social Determinants of Health in primary care settings. The presentation provides a broad overview of the topic and serves as introduction to future presentations of specific conditions by which people live, work and age. In particular, participants of this presentation will: Define social determinants of health, health equity and health disparities Describe the impact of social determinants on health outcomes Understand the importance of assessing for common social determinants of health in primary care settings Identify actionable steps to screen and refer to community supports for social determinants of health Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment.
Published: July 15, 2021
Presentation Slides
In this presentation, Mid-America MHTTC provides a rationale to address Social Determinants of Health in primary care settings. The presentation provides a broad overview of the topic and serves as introduction to future presentations of specific conditions by which people live, work and age. In particular, participants of this presentation will: Define social determinants of health, health equity and health disparities Describe the impact of social determinants on health outcomes Understand the importance of assessing for common social determinants of health in primary care settings Identify actionable steps to screen and refer to community supports for social determinants of health Learn more about Context Clues: Using Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) to Enhance Treatment.
Published: July 15, 2021
Print Media
>>> Click on the blue 'View Resource' button to access the Anchored in Our Roots materials <<<       Want more information and school mental health resources? Visit the Northwest MHTTC's School Mental Health page and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.
Published: July 12, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  July 2021 issue features include Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, Counselor's Corner blog post, and calendar of events for July 2021.   
Published: July 8, 2021
Multimedia
ABOUT THIS RESOURCE In celebration of June as Pride Month, Aleks Martin invites the listener to consider his or her personal definition of diversity, the value of diversity, and ways to lean closer instead of pulling apart when encountering differences. She presents skills for building provider well-being from an inclusion and equity perspective, including multiple dimensions of self-care. This month’s learning goals are: to learn to identify diversity ​in racial and ethnic, socioeconomic, geographic, and academic/professional backgrounds, including different opinions, religious beliefs, political beliefs, sexual orientations, heritage, and life experience; and learn skills from an inclusion and equity perspective. Find out more about the series here. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES View the webinar recording and access accompanying resources FACILITATOR Aleks Martin (S/he pronouns, but they is ok) has been in the health and social service field for over 20 years. Aleks was drawn to the LGBTQI2+ community in their mid-twenties working for a national HIV-prevention study with youth called, Young Asian Men’s Study (YAMS). This exposed them to the great work of HIV workers from other organizations and how community-based programs are critical in reaching out to the most vulnerable populations. During this time, they worked as a Disease Intervention Specialist with Public Health - Seattle & King County for 7 years, including working on the pilot study for the Rapid HIV Test Kit (then a 20-minute test). A big portion of their professional career was spent at Seattle Counseling Service, a behavioral health agency for the LGBTQ community. From 2003 to 2019, Aleks started as Database Manager, Health Educator, Program Coordinator to Chemical Dependency Counselor and Addictions Program Supervisor. This was the safe space where their yearning for higher education was cultivated so they could serve their community further. As a graduate of the University of Washington’s School of Social Work - Masters Program, Aleks developed their skills as a mental health clinician and social justice advocate. Aleks’ perspectives where shifted and allowed them to have a wider lens for diversity, inclusion and equity. Aleks was inspired to start a private practice to address the special needs of the LGBTQI2+ and BBIPOC (Black, Brown, Indigenous and People of Color), particularly Queer and Trans Asian and Pacific Islander people dealing with unique and special issues that intersect with race/culture and gender/sexuality like coming out, spiritual conflicts, cultural dissonance, gender transition, social navigation at work and other environments, interpersonal relationships from intimacy to friendships, understanding relationships with non-LGBTQI2+ partner(s), and so on. Terms of use and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) disclosure statement
Published: July 7, 2021
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