Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
Great Lakes Current June 2020: Building Health Equity Monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: August 10, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Great Lakes Current July 2020 Monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: August 10, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Great Lakes Current August 2020 Monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: August 10, 2020
Multimedia
Substance use, depression, and anxiety are increasing among primary care patients due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet many primary care providers lack the time, interest, and/training to address these behavioral health issues. In this session, we’ll discuss expanding the health care team with low-cost team members who can systematically deliver Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) to screen for substance use, and a collaborative care model for depression and anxiety.   Speaker:  Richard L. Brown , MD, MPH, is a highly experienced family physician and healthcare leader who is a nationally recognized leader in implementing the "Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment" (SBIRT) program focused on preventing problematic use, abuse and dependence of alcohol and illicit drugs. Dr. Brown has served as a practice-transformation team member for an SBIRT-related project administered by the National Council on Behavioral Health and funded by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  Most recently, Dr. Brown served as a market medical director for ConcertoHealth. Previous to that he as professor of Family Medicine and director of the Wisconsin Initiative to Promote Healthy Lifestyles, at the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and CEO and Chief Medical Officer for Wellsys, LLC. Among his many accolades, Dr. Brown is a recipient of several awards including the Hope in Healing Award from the Addiction Resource Council of Waukesha, Wis. He holds a bachelor's degree in biology from Brown University in Providence, R.I., where he also received his M.D. degree. He also earned an M.P.H. degree from the University of Washington, in Seattle, Wash.  PPT_SBIRT_Dr.Brown_6.30.20 Transcript_SBIRT_Dr.Brown_6.30.20 Q/A_SBIRT_Dr.Brown_6.30.20
Published: July 10, 2020
Multimedia
Mental health professionals are bracing for what may be an epidemic of clinical depression related to COVID-19. In this webinar, Dr. Jonathan Kanter will: 1. Review the science on risk factors for depression that cause this grave warning, 2. Share the latest information on how individuals are responding to the current crisis, and 3. Propose best practices for depression prevention and treatment moving forward. Although actual rates of future depression are hard to predict, organizations will need innovative and scalable solutions, given that our mental health services delivery systems are underpowered to meet demands before this crisis. The presentation will highlight online strategies that include disseminating evidence-based mental health tips, identifying and targeting risk groups, and conducting stepped-care treatment groups, stepping to individual treatment as needed.   Presenter  Dr. Jonathan Kanter is Director of the University of Washington’s Center for the Science of Social Connection. Over the course of his career, Dr. Kanter has investigated psychosocial interventions for depression, including how to disseminate culturally appropriate, easy-to-train, evidence-based approaches, with emphasis on evidence-based treatments such as Behavioral Activation for groups who lack resources and access to care. More recently, the Center has produced research on how to improve relationships and social connectedness and on relational processes that predict relational well-being and quality of life. Dr. Kanter has published over 100 scientific papers and 9 books on these topics and his work has been funded by NIH, SAMHSA, state governmental organizations, foundations, and private donors. He is regularly invited to give talks and workshops nationally and internationally. When the COVID-19 crisis hit Seattle, the Center pivoted its resources to understand and mitigate the relational and mental health consequences of the crisis, to assist with public health efforts, and to inform the public dialogue with scientifically informed advice. Dr. Kanter has been asked to comment on the relational and mental health consequences of the crisis by, and the Center’s response to the crisis has been featured on, NPR, the BBC, the New York Times, the Huffington Post, National Geographic, and other local and national news outlets. PPT_ClinicalDepressionandCOVID19_Kanter_6.11.20 Transcript_ClinicalDepressionandCOVID19_Kanter_6.11.20
Published: June 29, 2020
Multimedia
This presentation will focus on prioritizing self-care while working from home.    Learning Objectives Introduce the impact of job burnout, as well as how to recognize signs and symptoms  Define “Social Emotional Learning” and provide examples on how this can be included in the classroom or virtually Discuss tools to help prevent burn-out, and set boundaries to separate work time from personal Develop a self-care plan   Presenter Angela Begres is a licensed clinical social worker who did her training at the University of Chicago, where she obtained her MSW. She is an experienced trainer and presenter contracted both independently and through various nonprofits in the Chicago area, Michigan, and other areas, with experience integrating mental health education programs into the curriculum for students and staff within the Chicago and West Cook County public schools. In Partnership with the National Alliance for Mental Health (NAMI) Metro Suburban, Angela  developed a program to help decrease student stress and implement mindfulness in the classrooms. She has also worked with Chicago Family Services (DCFS) providing parenting education, with efforts to get parents reunited with their children.     PPT_HappyTeachers_AngelaBegres_6.3.20 Transcript_HappyTeachers_AngelaBegres_6.3.20
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
We are all scrambling to help the kids and families we serve stay healthy and engaged during this unprecedented time. As a response to the COVID-19 emergency, CATCH Global Foundation created CATCH at Home to provide free and easy access to several of CATCH's evidence-based health, nutrition, physical education, and vaping prevention materials. During the webinar, you will get an overview and tour of the Heath@Home free Google Classroom designed for parents and students as well as the free Distance Learning Resources on CATCH.org for educators including new topical content such as immune health and risk of lung disease and vaping. Virtual CATCH Champ in Action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFbDBDR13BE Abby Rose is a Program Manager for CATCH Global Foundation where she is responsible for the development and dissemination of nutrition education, physical activity, youth vaping prevention and health promotion programs. Abby is active in SHAPE America including serving on their Physical Activity Council and Early Childhood Advisory Group. Previously, Abby was a School Wellness Specialist in the Office of Student Health and Wellness of Chicago Public Schools. Her main areas of focus were Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming (CSPAP) and early childhood wellness. Abby was the founding PE teacher and Director of Health and Wellness at Namaste Charter School, a national model of school wellness as a vehicle for student success on the southwest side of Chicago. She holds a MSED from Northwestern University.     PPT_CATCH Health@Home_AbbyRose_6.4.20 Transcript_CATCH Health@Home_AbbyRose_6.4.20
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
In this time of changing methods to deliver services, everyone is looking to make sure they have the skills and knowledge to provide clients with the best possible experience.  This webinar will provide an overview on how to facilitate a virtual support group with practical advice and experiences from two current facilitators. Presenters:  Vivian Flanagan joined NAMI Fox Valley in 2017 after taking the 12-week Family to Family class. The many challenges she and her husband were facing as they dealt with their son’s mental illness drew them to seek education and support from the NAMI organization. Presently, Vivian serves as the Family Program Coordinator for NAMI Fox Valley. She holds a degree in Human Growth and Development from University of Wisconsin Green Bay with a teaching certification in ECE and grades K-6. Vivian, who taught 4K for 30 years in the Kaukauna School District, began as a volunteer receptionist for NAMI Fox Valley before joining the staff and continues to fill that role one morning per week. She has also been trained to facilitate Family Support Groups.  In addition, her training includes Mental Health Chat, a presentation for school-age children. Her responsibilities as Family Program Coordinator include organizing and scheduling the Family-2-Family, NAMI Basics, Familia-2-Familia, and NAMI and Friends education classes. She also oversees the Family and Parent/Caregiver Support Groups.  Her responsibilities include offering support to family members in person, email or by phone. To keep her facilitators informed and to recognize the work they do as volunteers, Vivian plans quarterly dinner meetings, bringing in speakers and providing pertinent updates about NAMI Fox Valley.  "NAMI, through years of challenges, helped my family navigate the roller coaster rides that mental illness presented to us. That is why I work here.  My desire is that my experiences will give others hope."   Vicki Rivera joined NAMI Fox Valley’s staff in 2016 after completing their Peer Specialist Training. She started her career as a Peer Companion at Iris Place-a program of NAMI Fox Valley and progressed to her current role as Peer Program Coordinator. In this role, Vicki Rivera is responsible for all peer education and support groups. Having a close working relationship with Vivian Flanagan helps in the success of NAMI Fox Valley’s family and peer programs. Vicki holds a Bachelor of Science in both Psychology and Human Services from Upper Iowa University and certified in LGBTQ Mental Health from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.   Guide for Offering NAMI Programs Online PPT_Ins&OutsVirtualSupportGroups_V.Flanagan,V.Rivera_6.8.20 Q/A_Ins&OutsVirtualSupportGroups_V.Flanagan,V.Rivera_6.8.20 Transcript_Ins&OutsVirtualSupportGroups_V.Flanagan,V.Rivera_6.8.20
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
Dr. Pauline Boss will explain ambiguous loss, its effects, its differences from ordinary loss and PTSD, and its complicating grief. She presents six culturally inclusive guidelines for treatment and intervention, useful regardless of your discipline. She also addresses self-of-the-therapist issues for these uncertain times. Dr. Boss is the author of many books, including  Loss, Trauma, and Resilience: Therapeutic Work with Ambiguous Loss (W.W. Norton, 2006) and Ambiguous Loss: Learning to Live with Unresolved Grief (Harvard University Press, 2000) Presenter:  Dr. Pauline Boss is an educator and researcher who is widely recognized for her groundbreaking research on what is now known as the theory of ambiguous loss. Dr. Boss is known as a pioneer in the interdisciplinary study of family stress. For over 30 years, her work has focused on connecting family science and sociology with family therapy and psychology. Her multidisciplinary perspective has allowed her to work as a scientist-practitioner to develop theory that guides practice.The importance of her work on ambiguous loss is validated by her election to three different professional organizations: the American Psychological Association, the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, and the National Council on Family Relations. Read Dr. Boss’s complete bio here.   PPT_AmbiguousLoss_Dr.Boss_6.12.20 Q/A_AmbiguousLoss_Dr.Boss_6.12.20 Transcript_AmbiguousLoss_Dr.Boss_6.12.20
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
While racism and classism are not exclusive to the United States, the American paradigm is unique due to its history of slavery, conquest, and immigration.  Each new wave of immigrants to America has experienced systematic inequality in a system based on ethnic and racial oppression. The pressure of conforming and confronting this system produces stress and mental anguish, which primarily afflicts minority communities.  In the recorded presentation Liberty, Humiliation, and Identity: Race and the Suffering of America, Albert Thompson will cover how to engage in a dialogue about physical and mental health that encompasses societal morbidity. We will examine how particular events in our history demonstrate the consequences of racial views and our need to listen and engage. Behavioral health providers must consider race and the impact it has on leadership. Change leaders need to be politically and socially knowledgeable, listen, and understand a broader perspective of historical foreign and domestic policy related to race, ethnicity, and culture. To gain the agility necessary to navigate within an ever-growing diverse population in need of mental health and addiction services in our country, we must consider elevating skills that transcend culture and human-made racial boundaries.
Published: June 17, 2020
Multimedia
The COVID-19 pandemic is heightening awareness of health care disparities, with the virus affecting minority populations disproportionately. Racially-motivated attacks related to the pandemic add additional stress for Asian American communities, including Hmong communities.    Providing mental health services in the present and future conditions will require a new consideration for cultural elements and linguistic tools when serving culturally diverse communities. Dr. Pang Foua Yang Rhodes will discuss how cultural values, historical trauma, and acculturation may influence how Hmong individuals and communities respond to large scale crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic.  Objectives: 1) Identify relevant Hmong-specific factors influencing crisis response at the individual, interpersonal, community, and societal levels 2) Understand the challenges Hmong may experience during COVID-19 from a trauma-informed lens 3) Explain culturally relevant communications approaches and mental health services     PPT_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services During COVID-19: Culturally Responsive Factors to Consider for the Hmong Population Transcript_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services During COVID-19: Culturally Responsive Factors to Consider for the Hmong Population Hmong Transcript_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services During COVID-19: Culturally Responsive Factors to Consider for the Hmong Population
Published: May 28, 2020
Multimedia
Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services during COVID-19   Part II Culturally Responsive Factors to Consider in Times of Crisis Providing mental health services in the present and future conditions will require a new consideration for cultural elements and linguistic tools via a re-imagined perspective on policy and technology when serving culturally diverse communities. Dr. Michelle Evans will guide us through the use of these tools, the challenges, and the opportunities we now have amid a crisis.    PPT_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services (PART 2, Factors To Consider)_M.Evans_04_17_20.pdf Transcript:Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services during COVID-19 Part II  
Published: May 27, 2020
Multimedia
Recorded May 5th, 2020 Panelists: Danis Russell Jeff Coady Kwame Gyasi Jeanne Pulvermacher Dave Gomel Tom Wright Judi Jobe Michelle DeRosso   Transcript_Region 5: Supporting Behavioral Health Programs & Personnel During COVID-19
Published: May 26, 2020
Multimedia
This webinar record is Part 1 of the "Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services During COVID-19" series.  Presented By: Albert Thompson Although COVID-19 continues to be a daily concern, large-scale epidemics are certainly not solely a 21st century issue. In this presentation, Thompson expands our focus from the world's present circumstances so we can better understand how society has responded to past health crises and the disproportionately devastating impact these events had, and continue to have, on marginalized populations as a result of prejudicial treatment and economic disadvantage.  PPT_Culturally Relevant Services in Crisis (Part 1)_A.Thompson_04_22_20.pdf TRANSCRIPT_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Serv(Part1)_Thompson_04_22_20.pdf
Published: May 19, 2020
Multimedia
Looking for the silver lining: Resolving our ambivalence about using MI in telehealth?  This webinar will discuss and help you to:  Recognize the differences between using MI face-to-face or via telehealth  Discuss solutions to common barriers Prepare to use/improve your use of MI in the resolution of ambivalence via telehealth   Transcript Handout Presenter: Dr. Michelle Drapkin, Ph.D. Dr. Michelle Drapkin received her Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and completed both her clinical psychology internship and postdoctoral fellowship in treatment outcomes research at the University of California, San Diego/VA San Diego. She is a longtime member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers and is sought out for consultation and training globally.  
Published: May 13, 2020
Multimedia
Presenter Jonathan Neufeld, director of the Great Plains Telehealth Resource and Assistance Center, provides an overview of telehealth issues for behavioral health providers as they rapidly transition to virtual delivery of services and supports. Topics covered include definitions, modalities, and basics of delivering psychotherapy and other specialty mental health services.  Journey Mental Health Center, based in Madison, WI, has rapidly expanded telehealth services to meet the needs of consumers across a wide array of settings and levels of care.  This presentation highlights the considerations that were incorporated to promote safe, secure telehealth experiences.  Journey team members Thomas McCarthy and Lisa Lizak presents a case study about the agency's shift to virtual services.  Transcript Dr. Neufeld PowerPoint Journey Mental Health Center PowerPoint    Speakers:   Jonathan Neufeld, PhD, HSSP, Director of the Great Plains Telehealth Resource and Assistance Center (gpTRAC), a federally funded technical assistance center program housed at the University of Minnesota. gpTRAC provides telehealth training to healthcare providers and programs interested in implementing, evaluating and enhancing telehealth programs. The program serves organizations in the six-state region including Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota and Nebraska.           Thomas McCarthy has worked at Journey Mental Health Center for over 3 years, with experience as a community-based clinician, outpatient therapist, and Clinical EHR System Analyst.  In his current role, he provides training and support to clinical staff using the electronic health record.  Thomas recently assisted the agency in developing workflows to rapidly expand use of telehealth technology.         Lisa Lizak has worked in the field of social services for 30 years and has provided clinical, case management and administrative services. For the past 13 years, she has worked as a policy writer and Organization Resources Manager at Journey Mental Health Center in Madison, WI. Lisa created the telehealth program six years ago at Journey.    
Published: May 5, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
April 2020 issue of the Great Lakes Current, with a special focus on responding to COVID-19.  Includes links to resources and information produced by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC, as well as the other TTC programs across the country. 
Published: April 15, 2020
Multimedia
This presentation by Sheila Weix, MSN, RN, CARN was recorded on April 1, 2020 and is a follow-up to her PART 1 presentation released on March 20, 2020. Viewers will be provided with updated information on the ever-changing challenges facing healthcare providers under the restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as best practices for reducing exposure risks, maximizing limited resources, and safely managing treatment during this difficult time.   Transcript
Published: April 8, 2020
Print Media
According to the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (2003), the goal of a social emotional learning (SEL) program is to foster the development of five emotional and behavioral competencies: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  We are all learning to navigate remote learning and education from afar. Luckily there are several reputable, evidence-informed resources available to help educators and families promote social and emotional well-being in their students outside the classroom. The Great Lakes MHTTC School-based Supplement has compiled a list of SEL resources, lesson plans, activities, games, and tip sheets to get you started on your SEL at home journey.  Download SEL AT HOME: Remote Learning Options 
Published: April 8, 2020
Multimedia
Providing SUD services during a pandemic requires a mix of disaster preparedness, safety precautions, telehealth, and ethics. During her tenure as a leader in SUD treatment, Sheila Weix has been involved with emergencies related to the HIV epidemic, 9/11, and the 2008 economic collapse. She is currently applying this experience in an outpatient treatment service that includes medication-assisted treatment in rural Wisconsin during the COVID19 pandemic. Webinar participants will learn about: Safety precautions How to move all services to telehealth Reimbursement contingencies Leadership actions underway to address this rapidly changing situation    Transcript
Published: March 30, 2020
Multimedia
Suicide remains a leading cause of death in our country, affecting all segments of the population. People just released from prison are at higher-risk of suicide, particularly if they also struggle with substance use. This webinar will present lessons learned from a research study that evaluates the effectiveness of the Safety Planning Intervention, a strategy for reducing suicide events among people transitioning from jail to the community. Principal Investigator Dr. Jennifer E. Johnson of Michigan State University will describe the nature of the problem and ways to reduce suicide events, given frequent substance use in this high-risk population. Recorded on March 3, 2020 Download Presentation Slides This webinar was presented in collaboration with the Great Lakes ATTC and the Central East ATTC and MHTTC. 
Published: March 10, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: March 5, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
February 2020 issue of electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: February 11, 2020
Presentation Slides
African Americans have lower rates of retention in substance use disorder treatment than the general population. In this one-hour webinar, Mark Sanders, LCSW, CSC, presents an overview of the factors that prevent African Americans from engaging in treatment, along with strategies that treatment organizations can use to increase engagement.  Presented on February 5, 2020.  Download the presentation slides. 
Published: February 5, 2020
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