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Multimedia
To view resources from this training, click ATTACHMENT links Recording coming soon! Event Description Review the increased nutritional needs of pregnancy and lactation. Learn about obstacles to achieving optimal dietary intake during pregnancy and after birth.  Explore the link between worsened mental health and poor or limited dietary intake in mothers and infants. Describe some steps clinicians can take to support people during the perinatal period through the lens of nutrition.    Trainer Nathaniel Johnson, PhD  Dr. Nathaniel Johnson is in his second year as an assistant professor at the University of North Dakota. He received his doctorate only a year and a half ago in Nutrition and Exercise Sciences from NDSU. He has published 14 research papers across a diverse set of journals such as Nutrition and Metabolic Insights, The Journal of Clinical Medicine, and Sensors. He is the founder and organizer of the UND Disability Affinity Network for Employees and is passionate about nutrition, disability, and equity. On a personal note, he loves his family, enjoys sports and competitions of all varieties, and has never met a dog that he doesn’t like.     
Published: May 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating Women's History Month and National Social Work Month. It also features updated versions of the Sustainability Planning in Prevention Guidebook and Sustainability Planning in Prevention Toolkit, as well as upcoming trainings focused on provider well-being and culturally responsive services for Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) clients. As always, you will also find links to all scheduled events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC! Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: March 18, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The January 2024 issue features the third installment of the Counselor's Corner blog series: Integrating Spirituality and Counseling with African American Clients, information on the Opioid Response Network's 2022-2023 regional summits, and a call for applications for the upcoming HEART (Healing Ethno And Racial Trauma) Training for Behavioral Health Providers Serving Hispanic & Latinx Communities intensive training series. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: January 11, 2024
Multimedia
    The Great Lakes MHTTC's training series, Applying Culturally Responsive and Trauma-Informed Care at the Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health is now available in an online flipbook! Peruse this digital collection to access webinar recordings, practitioner resources, and evidence-based recommendations for providing culturally responsive and trauma-informed care to those experiencing mental illness and trauma as a result of intimate partner violence (IPV) and/or domestic violence (DV).       TRAINERS Cathy Cave, Senior Training Consultant, The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Cathy Cave has more than 30 years’ experience as an administrator, facilitator and consultant specializing in cultural inclusion, equity, anti-racism work and disparities elimination, trauma informed services and supports, organizational development, supervisory practice and leadership coaching within child welfare, juvenile justice, disaster response, health care, mental health, and substance use services. She is one of New York State’s early trauma champions, coordinating county collaboratives and clinical training trauma conferences. For the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, Cathy is engaged in internal and external planning, development, and change initiatives. She provides in-person and virtual training, TA, and curriculum development supporting programs, coalitions, other technical assistance centers, governmental bodies and community-based organizations. Since 2012 as a Senior Training Consultant with NCDVTMH, she utilizes her survivor, family, community and administrative perspectives to facilitate organizational change to improve service quality at local, state and national levels.   Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network Rachel Ramirez is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.   Victoria “Tori” Wynecoop-Abrahamson, Training and Technical Assistance Manager at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Victoria “Tori” Wynecoop-Abrahamson (she/her) is a citizen of the Spokane Tribe located in Eastern Washington State and the Training and Technical Assistance Manager at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health (NCDVTMH). She began her advocacy journey during her undergraduate career at Illinois College by establishing a sexual assault support group in response to the #MeToo movement. After graduation, she returned home to the Spokane Indian Reservation and worked as a Domestic Violence Advocate providing assistance to survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, teen dating violence, stalking, and elder abuse. Assistance for survivors often included accessing resources for civil and criminal court cases, mental health support, and substance use services. This position encouraged Tori to pursue and complete a Master of Social Work at the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. Prior to joining NCDVTMH, Tori provided SAMHSA-funded training and technical assistance to tribal communities and nations with a focus on building program capacity and sustainability in the areas of suicide prevention, substance use, and mental health.   Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Gabriela Zapata-Alma is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a Lecturer at the University of Chicago, where they direct the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Training Program. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence and their traumatic effects through innovative and evidence-based clinical, housing, resource advocacy, peer-led, and HIV-integrated care programs. Currently, Gabriela authors best practices, leads national capacity-building efforts, and provides trauma-informed policy consultation to advance health equity and social justice.  
Published: September 26, 2023
Print Media
  Internal Family Systems (IFS, sometimes nicknamed "Parts Work") is an evidence-based model of psychotherapy that acknowledges that the mind naturally contains multiple parts with different purposes, needs, and stories. When our inner parts feel safe and have their concerns addressed, our core self knows how to heal, allowing us to become integrated and whole. Today, IFS has a legacy of effectiveness in the treatment of trauma and in addressing a variety of mental health concerns. This guide was created by WAFCA with funding from the Great Lakes MHTTC and is based on material presented by Dr. Frank Anderson on March 23, 2023 for WAFCA-CE.   WAFCA serves as the Wisconsin partner for the Great Lakes MHTTC. 
Published: August 15, 2023
Multimedia
  Learning objectives: Discuss evidence based treatment options and other alternative treatments available when managing care for women experiencing perinatal mental health disorders. Explain perinatal loss and bereavement and how to communicate with families experiencing grief and trauma. Discuss relevant resources  available to mothers and their families to help identify risks and other perinatal considerations for better coping and management strategies   Presented by: Dr. Marianela Rodriguez and Elizabeth O'Brien Dr. Marianela Rodríguez Reynaldo is a Clinical Psychologist who has dedicated the past 15 years to the work of mental health and wellness during the perinatal period. She is a member of Postpartum Support International where she serves as the coordinator in Puerto Rico and a national trainer on PMADs. She currently works as a Mental Health Consultant for the Puerto Rico Department of Health in the Maternal-Infant and Adolescent Division where she can promote public health changes by sharing the outcomes of this project. She has worked with a diverse group of birth workers on island, several community-based programs that provide health care services and support to perinatal women, and is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal-infant care.   Elizabeth O’Brien, LPC, PMH-C After listening to hundreds of women struggle with how invisible labor negatively impacts their relationships, careers and family systems, Elizabeth knew something had to change. Blending her work as a mindset repairist, a self-made business owner, and women’s activist, she has built a feminist business consulting firm for women entrepreneurs while still offering psychotherapy in her private practice. Elizabeth has over twenty years of clinical experience as a psychotherapist and is a recognized expert in women’s well-being, specializing in Maternal Mental Health. She has contributed to articles in The Washington Post and Atlanta Magazine, and has been featured on podcasts, and an ebook. In 2017, she founded the award-winning Postpartum Support International Georgia Chapter (PSI-GA) where she served as president for a term. This chapter has become a national leader recognized for its fundraising, innovative training courses, and mentorship of other PSI chapters. Additionally, Elizabeth is a nationally recognized leader and the 2019 winner of the Carolyn Wetzel Continuum Award honoring her role as an agent for positive change for the health and wellbeing of Georgia families. Currently Elizabeth co-chairs the Georgia Perinatal Task Force and is one of the national trainers with Postpartum Support International. Elizabeth earned an MA in Dance Movement Therapy, where she focused on complex trauma and early childhood mental health. Committed to integrating mind/body/spirit treatment she serves women throughout their lifespans. Additionally, she consults with creatives, therapists, and female entrepreneurs both individually and in groups to help them launch their own businesses. Elizabeth spent 15 years in Alaska, working on the rural tundra, in hospitals, correctional facilities, and intimate partner settings. Today she toggles her work between Atlanta, and southeast coastal Alaska. She is a feminist, meditation teacher, wife, mother, beekeeper, yogi, kayaker and gardener. Elizabeth is passionate about changing the economic and mental health landscape for all mothers locally and globally into a more balanced, validated, and sane position.     Learn more about this series: Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Other Considerations     
Published: July 24, 2023
Multimedia
  Learning objectives: Discuss the prevalence of perinatal depression and the impact it has among women. Describe signs and symptoms of depression during the perinatal period including screening processes for timely initiation of treatment options Identify appropriate perinatal resources concerning depression for mothers and their families for a smooth transition into parenthood.   Presented by: Dr. Marianela Rodriguez and Elizabeth O'Brien Dr. Marianela Rodríguez Reynaldo is a Clinical Psychologist who has dedicated the past 15 years to the work of mental health and wellness during the perinatal period. She is a member of Postpartum Support International where she serves as the coordinator in Puerto Rico and a national trainer on PMADs. She currently works as a Mental Health Consultant for the Puerto Rico Department of Health in the Maternal-Infant and Adolescent Division where she can promote public health changes by sharing the outcomes of this project. She has worked with a diverse group of birth workers on island, several community-based programs that provide health care services and support to perinatal women, and is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal-infant care.   Elizabeth O’Brien, LPC, PMH-C After listening to hundreds of women struggle with how invisible labor negatively impacts their relationships, careers and family systems, Elizabeth knew something had to change. Blending her work as a mindset repairist, a self-made business owner, and women’s activist, she has built a feminist business consulting firm for women entrepreneurs while still offering psychotherapy in her private practice. Elizabeth has over twenty years of clinical experience as a psychotherapist and is a recognized expert in women’s well-being, specializing in Maternal Mental Health. She has contributed to articles in The Washington Post and Atlanta Magazine, and has been featured on podcasts, and an ebook. In 2017, she founded the award-winning Postpartum Support International Georgia Chapter (PSI-GA) where she served as president for a term. This chapter has become a national leader recognized for its fundraising, innovative training courses, and mentorship of other PSI chapters. Additionally, Elizabeth is a nationally recognized leader and the 2019 winner of the Carolyn Wetzel Continuum Award honoring her role as an agent for positive change for the health and wellbeing of Georgia families. Currently Elizabeth co-chairs the Georgia Perinatal Task Force and is one of the national trainers with Postpartum Support International. Elizabeth earned an MA in Dance Movement Therapy, where she focused on complex trauma and early childhood mental health. Committed to integrating mind/body/spirit treatment she serves women throughout their lifespans. Additionally, she consults with creatives, therapists, and female entrepreneurs both individually and in groups to help them launch their own businesses. Elizabeth spent 15 years in Alaska, working on the rural tundra, in hospitals, correctional facilities, and intimate partner settings. Today she toggles her work between Atlanta, and southeast coastal Alaska. She is a feminist, meditation teacher, wife, mother, beekeeper, yogi, kayaker and gardener. Elizabeth is passionate about changing the economic and mental health landscape for all mothers locally and globally into a more balanced, validated, and sane position.     Learn more about this series: Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Other Considerations     
Published: July 24, 2023
Multimedia
  Learning objectives: Discuss the prevalence of psychotic disorders and the impact they have among women and their families. Describe signs and symptoms of common psychotic disorders among women during the perinatal period and what screening processes to use to timely identification. Identify appropriate perinatal resources concerning common psychotic disorders for mothers and their families Presented by: Dr. Marianela Rodriguez and Elizabeth O'Brien Dr. Marianela Rodríguez Reynaldo is a Clinical Psychologist who has dedicated the past 15 years to the work of mental health and wellness during the perinatal period. She is a member of Postpartum Support International where she serves as the coordinator in Puerto Rico and a national trainer on PMADs. She currently works as a Mental Health Consultant for the Puerto Rico Department of Health in the Maternal-Infant and Adolescent Division where she can promote public health changes by sharing the outcomes of this project. She has worked with a diverse group of birth workers on island, several community-based programs that provide health care services and support to perinatal women, and is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal-infant care.   Elizabeth O’Brien, LPC, PMH-C After listening to hundreds of women struggle with how invisible labor negatively impacts their relationships, careers and family systems, Elizabeth knew something had to change. Blending her work as a mindset repairist, a self-made business owner, and women’s activist, she has built a feminist business consulting firm for women entrepreneurs while still offering psychotherapy in her private practice. Elizabeth has over twenty years of clinical experience as a psychotherapist and is a recognized expert in women’s well-being, specializing in Maternal Mental Health. She has contributed to articles in The Washington Post and Atlanta Magazine, and has been featured on podcasts, and an ebook. In 2017, she founded the award-winning Postpartum Support International Georgia Chapter (PSI-GA) where she served as president for a term. This chapter has become a national leader recognized for its fundraising, innovative training courses, and mentorship of other PSI chapters. Additionally, Elizabeth is a nationally recognized leader and the 2019 winner of the Carolyn Wetzel Continuum Award honoring her role as an agent for positive change for the health and wellbeing of Georgia families. Currently Elizabeth co-chairs the Georgia Perinatal Task Force and is one of the national trainers with Postpartum Support International. Elizabeth earned an MA in Dance Movement Therapy, where she focused on complex trauma and early childhood mental health. Committed to integrating mind/body/spirit treatment she serves women throughout their lifespans. Additionally, she consults with creatives, therapists, and female entrepreneurs both individually and in groups to help them launch their own businesses. Elizabeth spent 15 years in Alaska, working on the rural tundra, in hospitals, correctional facilities, and intimate partner settings. Today she toggles her work between Atlanta, and southeast coastal Alaska. She is a feminist, meditation teacher, wife, mother, beekeeper, yogi, kayaker and gardener. Elizabeth is passionate about changing the economic and mental health landscape for all mothers locally and globally into a more balanced, validated, and sane position.     Learn more about this series: Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Other Considerations   
Published: July 24, 2023
Multimedia
  Learning objectives: Discuss the prevalence of varying anxiety disorders and the impact they have among women and their families. Describe types of anxiety disorders in the perinatal period and what screen processes can be utilized for proper identification Identify appropriate perinatal resources concerning anxiety disorders for mothers and their families   Presented by: Dr. Marianela Rodriguez and Elizabeth O'Brien Dr. Marianela Rodríguez Reynaldo is a Clinical Psychologist who has dedicated the past 15 years to the work of mental health and wellness during the perinatal period. She is a member of Postpartum Support International where she serves as the coordinator in Puerto Rico and a national trainer on PMADs. She currently works as a Mental Health Consultant for the Puerto Rico Department of Health in the Maternal-Infant and Adolescent Division where she can promote public health changes by sharing the outcomes of this project. She has worked with a diverse group of birth workers on island, several community-based programs that provide health care services and support to perinatal women, and is an activist for reproductive justice and human rights in maternal-infant care.   Elizabeth O’Brien, LPC, PMH-C After listening to hundreds of women struggle with how invisible labor negatively impacts their relationships, careers and family systems, Elizabeth knew something had to change. Blending her work as a mindset repairist, a self-made business owner, and women’s activist, she has built a feminist business consulting firm for women entrepreneurs while still offering psychotherapy in her private practice. Elizabeth has over twenty years of clinical experience as a psychotherapist and is a recognized expert in women’s well-being, specializing in Maternal Mental Health. She has contributed to articles in The Washington Post and Atlanta Magazine, and has been featured on podcasts, and an ebook. In 2017, she founded the award-winning Postpartum Support International Georgia Chapter (PSI-GA) where she served as president for a term. This chapter has become a national leader recognized for its fundraising, innovative training courses, and mentorship of other PSI chapters. Additionally, Elizabeth is a nationally recognized leader and the 2019 winner of the Carolyn Wetzel Continuum Award honoring her role as an agent for positive change for the health and wellbeing of Georgia families. Currently Elizabeth co-chairs the Georgia Perinatal Task Force and is one of the national trainers with Postpartum Support International. Elizabeth earned an MA in Dance Movement Therapy, where she focused on complex trauma and early childhood mental health. Committed to integrating mind/body/spirit treatment she serves women throughout their lifespans. Additionally, she consults with creatives, therapists, and female entrepreneurs both individually and in groups to help them launch their own businesses. Elizabeth spent 15 years in Alaska, working on the rural tundra, in hospitals, correctional facilities, and intimate partner settings. Today she toggles her work between Atlanta, and southeast coastal Alaska. She is a feminist, meditation teacher, wife, mother, beekeeper, yogi, kayaker and gardener. Elizabeth is passionate about changing the economic and mental health landscape for all mothers locally and globally into a more balanced, validated, and sane position.     Learn more about this series: Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Other Considerations     
Published: July 24, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event African American Women & Mental Health: Strengths, Challenges and Opportunities for Growth, originally held on May 18, 2023.   Presentation Slides
Published: May 30, 2023
Multimedia
***RECORDING***  (click the link below) Part 2: Invisible Injuries: The Complex Intersection of Domestic Violence, Behavioral Health, Traumatic Brain Injury and Strangulation   DESCRIPTION: The significant impact of domestic violence on a person’s behavioral health—including substance use and mental health conditions—has long been recognized by researchers and practitioners alike. In addition, the domestic violence movement has known for decades that abusers frequently assault their partners by targeting the head, neck, and face—through blows to the head that can cause traumatic brain injuries (concussions) and strangulation.  We are just discovering how that violence impacts the brain, and therefore a person’s health. Brain injury caused by domestic violence is rarely identified and almost never immediately treated, and results in short- and long-term physical, emotional, and cognitive consequences that can impact every area of a person’s life--including their ability to successfully access and participate in your agency's services. This session will share with you The Ohio Domestic Violence Network and The Ohio State University’s project and research that resulted in the creation of an evidence-based framework CARE (Connect, Acknowledge, Respond, Evaluate) and its accompanying CARE tools for you to use to address brain injury.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the relationship between domestic violence and brain injury. Explain the evidence-based framework: Connect, Acknowledge, Respond and Evaluate (CARE). Promote CARE tools to address brain injury.     PRESENTER: Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 15, 2023
Multimedia
***RECORDING*** (click the link below) Part 1: Invisible Injuries: The Complex Intersection of Domestic Violence, Behavioral Health, Traumatic Brain Injury and Strangulation   DESCRIPTION: The significant impact of domestic violence on a person’s behavioral health—including substance use and mental health conditions—has long been recognized by researchers and practitioners alike. In addition, the domestic violence movement has known for decades that abusers frequently assault their partners by targeting the head, neck, and face—through blows to the head that can cause traumatic brain injuries (concussions) and strangulation.  We are just discovering how that violence impacts the brain, and therefore a person’s health. Brain injury caused by domestic violence is rarely identified and almost never immediately treated, and results in short- and long-term physical, emotional, and cognitive consequences that can impact every area of a person’s life--including their ability to successfully access and participate in your agency's services. This session will share with you The Ohio Domestic Violence Network and The Ohio State University’s project and research that resulted in the creation of an evidence-based framework CARE (Connect, Acknowledge, Respond, Evaluate) and its accompanying CARE tools for you to use to address brain injury.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the relationship between domestic violence and brain injury. Explain the evidence-based framework: Connect, Acknowledge, Respond and Evaluate (CARE). Promote CARE tools to address brain injury.     PRESENTER:   Rachel Ramirez, LISW-S, RASS, is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). In this role, she oversees several initiatives on the intersection of domestic violence, disability, and health access, with a focus on trauma-informed services and partner-inflicted brain injury. She also provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, consultation, technical assistance, and program support. Rachel has been with ODVN for 15 years and has co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles, as well as been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, and The Washington Post discussing brain injury and domestic violence.       The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 1, 2023
Multimedia
Recording of the event Rites and Rituals: Bringing a Cultural Lens to Positive Youth Development for Black Girls, originally held on February 14, 2023.   Presentation slides
Published: February 16, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The January 2023 issue honors National Birth Defects Prevention Month by sharing resources and media from SAMHSA that focus on the effects of marijuana use during pregnancy. This issue also features new products from the Great Lakes MHTTC and PTTC, HealtheKnowledge content specific to women's reproductive health, and opportunities for mental health and SUD professionals to participate in ongoing research studies.  As always, The Great Lakes Current provides links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: January 17, 2023
Presentation Slides
Latinxs living in the US experience disparities in access and quality of mental health services. The social determinants of health, immigration status, immigration-related trauma, and the cumulative experience of inequity, combined with vulnerability during pregnancy and postpartum may result in a higher risk for mental health symptoms. Perinatal Mental Health Disorders (PMHDs) is a term used to include the various disorders that can affect individuals during pregnancy and postpartum. This advanced course provides relevant information on cultural considerations and culturally responsive treatment approaches for mental health providers working with Latinx populations experiencing or at risk for PMHDs. 
Published: January 9, 2023
Print Media
La violencia de pareja íntima (VPI) es un problema de salud pública grave y prevenible que afecta a millones de personas (CDC, 2019). El término “violencia de pareja” describe el daño físico, sexual o psicológico por parte de una pareja o cónyuge actual o anterior. Este tipo de violencia puede darse entre parejas heterosexuales o del mismo sexo. Los datos indican que las latinas experimentan tasas similares de violencia de pareja íntima (VPI) en comparación con las mujeres que no son latinas. Aproximadamente 1 de cada 3 latinas (34.4 %) experimentará VPI a lo largo de su vida y 1 de cada 12 latinas (8.6%) ha experimentado VPI en los últimos 12 meses, incluyendo violencia física y sexual, así como acoso. Este producto ofrece una guía para abordar consideraciones socioculturales y recomendaciones clínicas al evaluar y brindar servicios de salud mental a latinas que experimentaron IPV.
Published: November 29, 2022
Print Media
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of individuals (CDC, 2019). Intimate partner violence describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples. Data indicate that Latinas experience similar rates of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) compared to non-Latinas. About 1 in 3 Latinas (34.4 %) will experience IPV during her lifetime, and 1 in 12 Latinas (8.6%) has experienced IPV in the previous 12 months, including physical and sexual violence and stalking. This product offers guidelines for addressing sociocultural considerations and clinical recommendations while assessing and providing mental health services to Latinas that experienced IPV. 
Published: November 28, 2022
Multimedia
Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence: Family-Centered Approaches for Domestic Violence: Keeping Survivors' and Children's Needs in Mind (Part 5) DESCRIPTION: This webinar will focus on the foundations of family-centered work with survivors and introduce the Family Centered Toolkit for Domestic Violence Programs. Discussion will include guidance for using the toolkit and strategies for supporting well-being, safety, and the bonds between survivors of intimate partner violence and their children.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the importance of an integrated approach that supports parent-child relationships and families with a range of culturally responsive, trauma-informed, and developmentally sensitive services Discuss ways to use the Family Centered Tooklit for Domestic Violence Programs Explain strategies to support the wellbeing, and safety of IPV survivors and their children List accessible resources for DV advocates, program staff, and supervisors to enhance and sustain family-centered services within DV programs     PRESENTER: Cathy Cave, Senior Training Consultant, The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health   Cathy Cave has more than 30 years’ experience as an administrator, facilitator and consultant specializing in cultural inclusion, equity, anti-racism work and disparities elimination, trauma informed services and supports, organizational development, supervisory practice and leadership coaching within child welfare, juvenile justice, disaster response, health care, mental health, and substance use services. She is one of New York State’s early trauma champions, coordinating county collaboratives and clinical training trauma conferences. For the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, Cathy is engaged in internal and external planning, development, and change initiatives. She provides in-person and virtual training, TA, and curriculum development supporting programs, coalitions, other technical assistance centers, governmental bodies and community-based organizations. Since 2012 as a Senior Training Consultant with NCDVTMH, she utilizes her survivor, family, community and administrative perspectives to facilitate organizational change to improve service quality at local, state and national levels.       The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: October 27, 2022
Multimedia
Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence: Overdose Prevention and Intimate Partner Violence–Unique Risks, Needs, and Strategies (Part 4)     DESCRIPTION: Being abused by an intimate partner can increase the risk of accidental overdose while at the same time isolating survivors from potential sources of safety. Additionally, the stigma and criminalization of substance use is often leveraged by unsafe partners to further abuse and control survivors, increasing the risk of harm, marginalization, and overdose. This session will provide an overview of overdose risk factors and how they intersect with intimate partner violence and substance use coercion, as well as how to tailor evidence-based overdose prevention strategies to better support survivors.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify main overdose risk factors in survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Explain the intersections between IPV and substance user coercion. Describe evidence-based overdose prevention strategies for IPV survivors.     PRESENTER: Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a Lecturer at the University of Chicago, where they direct the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Training Program. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence and their traumatic effects through innovative and evidence-based clinical, housing, resource advocacy, peer-led, and HIV-integrated care programs. Currently, Gabriela authors best practices, leads national capacity-building efforts, and provides trauma-informed policy consultation to advance health equity and social justice.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: October 4, 2022
Multimedia
Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence: Working at the Intersections of Substance Use and Intimate Partner Violence–What Every Provider Needs to Know (Part 3)     DESCRIPTION: It has long been recognized that abuse by an intimate partner can have traumatic mental health and substance use effects. Research has found high rates of both past and current intimate partner violence (IPV) among people in substance use disorder and mental health care settings. A growing body of evidence has found that abuse is often targeted at a partner’s substance use and mental health in deliberate attempts to undermine and control survivors and keep them from achieving their recovery goals. These forms of abuse, known as substance use coercion and mental health coercion, not only jeopardize the well-being of survivors and their children, but also compromise the effectiveness of mental health and substance use disorder treatment. This session will clarify the relationship between IPV and substance use, as well as prepare participants to increase awareness of and better support survivors experiencing substance use coercion.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe ways of substance use coercion. Explain how substance use and mental health coercion influence in the effectiveness of treatment. Identify how clinicians can support individuals that experienced substance user coercion.     PRESENTER: Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a Lecturer at the University of Chicago, where they direct the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Training Program. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence and their traumatic effects through innovative and evidence-based clinical, housing, resource advocacy, peer-led, and HIV-integrated care programs. Currently, Gabriela authors best practices, leads national capacity-building efforts, and provides trauma-informed policy consultation to advance health equity and social justice.     The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: September 29, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.     Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence: Integrating Culturally Responsive Approaches for Survivors of Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence within Mental Health Services and Organizations (Part 2)     DESCRIPTION: There is no question that the experience of domestic violence (DV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) is traumatic and, oftentimes, isolating. When survivors access services, this process can also be isolating, especially if those services are not culturally responsive. As mental health professionals, it is important to have an understanding of both the impacts of power and control dynamics as well as how social and cultural norms influence survivors’ and their families perceptions of these experiences. Service providers must be aware of how their biases may interfere with their ability to effectively engage with survivors. This session will define the core elements of culturally responsive services and identify examples of supportive approaches for survivors of DV and IPV.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define culturally responsive services for DV and IPV survivors in mental health settings Identify at least two examples of culturally responsive approaches to support survivors of DV and IPV     TRAINING RECORDINGS: Check out the recording of the first session in this two-part series! Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence (IPV): Offering Accessible, Trauma-Informed, and Culturally Responsive Supports     SPEAKER:   Victoria “Tori” Wynecoop-Abrahamson (she/her) is a citizen of the Spokane Tribe located in Eastern Washington State and the Training and Technical Assistance Manager at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health (NCDVTMH). She began her advocacy journey during her undergraduate career at Illinois College by establishing a sexual assault support group in response to the #MeToo movement. After graduation, she returned home to the Spokane Indian Reservation and worked as a Domestic Violence Advocate providing assistance to survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, teen dating violence, stalking, and elder abuse. Assistance for survivors often included accessing resources for civil and criminal court cases, mental health support, and substance use services. This position encouraged Tori to pursue and complete a Master of Social Work at the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. Prior to joining NCDVTMH, Tori provided SAMHSA-funded training and technical assistance to tribal communities and nations with a focus on building program capacity and sustainability in the areas of suicide prevention, substance use, and mental health.
Published: August 25, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Let’s Talk about Intimate Partner Violence (IPV): Offering Accessible, Trauma-Informed, and Culturally Responsive Supports     DESCRIPTION: Domestic Violence can impact a survivor’s sense of physical and emotional safety, their overall health, their capacity to function in daily life, as well as their ability to successfully navigate the available support systems and resources that can help them. In this webinar we define and explore the impacts of  intimate partner violence (IPV) and the lasting effects of individual, historical, and collective trauma. The session 1 discussion will include information about how IPV specifically impacts mental health, substance use, parenting, and community connection.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Discuss the impact of intimate partner violence and traumatic events Explain how coervice control impacts mental health Learn about a framerwork focused on increasing support while providing cultural responsive and trauma-informed sevices     PRESENTER: Cathy Cave, Senior Training Consultant, The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health   Cathy Cave has more than 30 years’ experience as an administrator, facilitator and consultant specializing in cultural inclusion, equity, anti-racism work and disparities elimination, trauma informed services and supports, organizational development, supervisory practice and leadership coaching within child welfare, juvenile justice, disaster response, health care, mental health, and substance use services. She is one of New York State’s early trauma champions, coordinating county collaboratives and clinical training trauma conferences. For the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, Cathy is engaged in internal and external planning, development, and change initiatives. She provides in-person and virtual training, TA, and curriculum development supporting programs, coalitions, other technical assistance centers, governmental bodies and community-based organizations. Since 2012 as a Senior Training Consultant with NCDVTMH, she utilizes her survivor, family, community and administrative perspectives to facilitate organizational change to improve service quality at local, state and national levels.
Published: July 19, 2022
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Recording of the event Postpartum Depression Diagnosis & Treatment in the Black Community, originally held on June 2, 2022.     Slide Presentation
Published: June 7, 2022
Multimedia
May 24, 2022 Explores singing & song as a simple, free, and effective pathway to foster mental health for mothers with depression and their infants.   To watch the recording, go to: https://youtu.be/ItbpJrylQgg   Presenter:  Elizabeth Brown V. Brisola, PhD is a psychologist, musician, and researcher in the areas of health promotion and mental illness prevention, enthusiastic in fostering creativity and singing in human day-to-day life. She will be sharing her research and publications on mothers’ lived experiences and their meanings. Having completed most of her education in Brazil, she advocates for the Latinx population and participates in Yale’s Latino Colectivo and IRCC-Brazil projects.
Published: May 24, 2022
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